Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVcr
IN THE NEWS

Vcr

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
April 17, 1989 | From Times wire services
Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. has officially rejected a Soviet request to produce videocassette recorders in the Soviet Union, company officials said today. The Soviet Electronic Industry Ministry asked Matsushita in late 1987 to start local VCR production by assembling such finished parts as cylinders exported from Japan, the officials said. Matsushita has so far exported finished VCRs to the Soviet Union.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 15, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
If you long for the days of speckled images and crackling sounds, head to YouTube because it's now letting users relive the era of cassette tapes with a "VHS mode. " The new mode, which will only be around for one day, gives YouTube videos a shaky feel and grainy look -- reminiscent of what the images on a VHS tape would look like after being played too often. At times, the bottom right of the image curves inward, distorting the picture, and if you hit pause, the whole video starts to shake.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1998
Some broadcast and cable programs contain material included in the public school curriculum and on standardized examinations. Here are weekend home-viewing tips: Today. "Biography," Billie Jean King. (A&E, 5-6 p.m., repeating 9-10 p.m.) Based on her autobiography, this is a documentary about the women's tennis great who bested men's tennis star Bobby Riggs 25 years ago, becoming a symbol of the women's movement. VCR+ 962816 Also recommended: "CNN NewsStand" (CNN, 7-8 p.m.). Tonight the main story is about the new television network, PAX, which began broadcasting on 70 stations nationwide this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2008 | Jocelyn Y. Stewart, Times Staff Writer
Warren J. Ferguson, a senior Circuit Court judge who served nearly 42 years on the federal bench and presided over several cases with broad implications, including a case that helped alter the way the NBA selects players, has died. He was 87. Ferguson died June 25 of congestive heart failure at St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, said his son, Peter Ferguson. Appointed to the U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1990
I am furious that my favorite program, "Sunday Morning," is constantly shown at different times. On Feb. 11, it was listed at 7:30 a.m. I got up to find it started at 6 a.m. and ended at 7:30 a.m. I would set my VCR if CBS would be consistent or give some notice about the scheduling. Carolyn Carlsen, Seal Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000
Brian Lowry may be a self-styled "technophobe," but surely he must know that 90% of what TiVo and ReplayTV do can be replicated very simply by proper use of one's cable remote control and VCR settings ("Television, as You Like It," Feb. 13). All cable providers allow users to set commands that will switch stations at preset times. Once this is done, one only has to set the VCR, which is really very simple. So what do TiVo and ReplayTV offer? Only the ability to go to the bathroom during a program and come back not having missed a moment.
NEWS
June 9, 1989
I'm going to go right out and buy one of those great new home drug-testing devices and start using it on my kids right away ("Keeping an Eye on Kids" by Marcida Dodson, June 6). I'm sure they'll love and respect me all the more for teaching them this sound American ethical code. It will prepare them for the real world--if they're faced with a choice between right and wrong, the first thing to consider is who's watching. The best deterrent I can think of to keep my kids off drugs is the fear of having their VCR privileges taken away for a month.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1989
New Digital Video Recorder Developed: Sony Corp. announced that it has developed a portable digital videocassette recorder that allows tapes to be copied or edited more than 20 times with little loss in quality. The machine, dubbed the DVR-1, is the first portable VCR that uses digital rather than analog recording, resulting in better picture quality and little picture distortion when copies are made, Sony officials said. Although the machine is intended primarily for professionals, such as television journalists, company officials said they plan eventually to develop one for the general public.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
It's humiliating being a low-tech oaf in a high-tech world. Even medium-tech is many vidicons and vertical blanking intervals beyond my skill level. Each time I publicly lament missing a show because of a conflict, e-mails pour in telling me to tape it and watch it later, dummy, while fast-forwarding through the commercials as a bonus. Hello! As if I could program my VCR. Ever! When I try, I inevitably end up with the wrong show or a screen full of that grainy stuff that comes on when aliens take over your TV set. Not that sitting in front of buzzing snow isn't soothing when you're on overload.
NEWS
May 11, 1989 | JOSEPH N. BELL
I wanted to tape the Lakers' game the other evening because we were going out, so I started scrounging through several drawers of VCR tape for a blank. What I discovered, instead, was a treasure trove of shows I had taped and never watched. Most of them didn't have labels--a bad habit I'm trying to correct--so I had to put them on the VCR and play pieces of them to make sure I wasn't taping over something desperately valuable like the video of a stunt flight I made 3 years ago or my stepson's collection of Michael J. Fox minutiae.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2005 | Kevin Crust and Casey Dolan
Comedy 3rd Rock From the Sun: Season 1. John Lithgow stars as the leader of a group of aliens visiting Earth. Anchor Bay: six discs, 20 episodes, $39.98, July 26. Alf: Season 2. Gordon Shumway, a.k.a. ALF (Alien Life Form), is taken into the Tanner family after his spaceship crash-lands into the Tanners' garage. Lions Gate: two discs, $39.98, Aug. 23. The Benny Hill Show: The Lost Years. England's naughty comic in episodes not broadcast in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2003 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Dean C. Dunlavey, a Los Angeles trial lawyer who gained national recognition in 1984 after successfully arguing before the U.S. Supreme Court that consumers have the right to videotape copyrighted movies and other programs on television for their own use, has died. He was 77. Dunlavey died Saturday at a San Pedro hospital of complications from a fall.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As entertainment companies struggle in court to defend their music and movies against a new generation of digital pirates, one of their biggest challenges is an 18-year-old Supreme Court ruling on a defunct technology. The major record companies and Hollywood studios have sued a series of online file-sharing companies, accusing them of fueling rampant piracy of songs and videos on the Internet.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2001 | Howard Rosenberg
It's humiliating being a low-tech oaf in a high-tech world. Even medium-tech is many vidicons and vertical blanking intervals beyond my skill level. Each time I publicly lament missing a show because of a conflict, e-mails pour in telling me to tape it and watch it later, dummy, while fast-forwarding through the commercials as a bonus. Hello! As if I could program my VCR. Ever! When I try, I inevitably end up with the wrong show or a screen full of that grainy stuff that comes on when aliens take over your TV set. Not that sitting in front of buzzing snow isn't soothing when you're on overload.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flashing "12:00" on videocassette recorders represents everything wrong with modern technology. But help may be on the way with better equipment that automatically sets VCR clocks en masse. The half-million-dollar program sponsored by the Consumer Electronics Assn. would replace outdated gear at public television stations nationwide designed to automatically set the clock on VCRs by sending out a time stamp over the air or through cable.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Napster Inc., whose song-swapping software is reshaping the music industry, insists that pulling music off the Net for personal use and not paying for it is legal. That position was detailed in a rebuttal filed Monday in U.S. District Court in San Francisco to a recording industry lawsuit. Napster asserts that what its members do--sharing with each other their own copies of copyrighted materials--is as legal as people using a VCR to watch a borrowed movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1986 | TERRY ATKINSON
If electronics purveyors--of both hardware and software--were to slap a title on their holiday sales to date, it might be "It's a Wonderful Season," to paraphrase the classic Frank Capra perennial, "It's a Wonderful Life." "Overall, it's been a good Christmas," said Shervin Matinkhou, marketing manager at Adray's on Wilshire Boulevard. "Sales in consumer electronics have been even better than we expected."
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Shirley Cabey saved all the letters--the ones that called her son a "nigger," that wished the boy had died, that threatened his life if he survived the gunshot that sliced through his spine. Each note, with its ugly words and racial venom, sits pressed today inside the Cabey family's Bible. The Good Book, like Shirley and her son Darrell, remains where it was when the letters arrived 10 years ago--in an apartment in a South Bronx housing project.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2000 | JOHN BORLAND, CNET NEWS.COM
Undaunted by the legal backlash against a Web site that wanted to carry live television, another site has created an online VCR. RecordTV.com, based in Los Angeles, is offering Web surfers the ability to record TV shows and play them back online. Already, 50,000 people use the service, and snowballing interest is overwhelming the small site's systems.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2000
Brian Lowry may be a self-styled "technophobe," but surely he must know that 90% of what TiVo and ReplayTV do can be replicated very simply by proper use of one's cable remote control and VCR settings ("Television, as You Like It," Feb. 13). All cable providers allow users to set commands that will switch stations at preset times. Once this is done, one only has to set the VCR, which is really very simple. So what do TiVo and ReplayTV offer? Only the ability to go to the bathroom during a program and come back not having missed a moment.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|