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BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
Some of the Tech Coast's most prominent venture capitalists had some advice for entrepreneurs at a meeting of the Southern California Software Council: Assume we've heard your pitch before. Carrie Stone, a partner with La Jolla-based Enterprise Partners, said her firm receives 5,000 business plans a year but decides to fund only about two dozen. Other venture capitalists said they are just as picky.
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BUSINESS
December 11, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The venture capital community, already battered by the stock market's plunge this year, was shaken again early this month by news that well-regarded player Crosspoint Venture Partners has abandoned plans for a $1-billion fund. The decision has created a brouhaha in the VC world and might prompt some large institutional investors to rethink plans to invest more capital with venturists in 2001--especially in the case of smaller, newer funds.
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BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When do you pull the plug on a fledgling company? That's the question more venture capitalists are asking in the wake of the continuing carnage among publicly traded "dot-com" companies. "I'm coming across this every day," said Richard Koffler, head of a small Los Angeles incubator for new companies. "VCs are telling companies they don't have the time and they don't want to put more money into them."
BUSINESS
October 16, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When do you pull the plug on a fledgling company? That's the question more venture capitalists are asking in the wake of the continuing carnage among publicly traded "dot-com" companies. "I'm coming across this every day," said Richard Koffler, head of a small Los Angeles incubator for new companies. "VCs are telling companies they don't have the time and they don't want to put more money into them."
BUSINESS
December 11, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The venture capital community, already battered by the stock market's plunge this year, was shaken again early this month by news that well-regarded player Crosspoint Venture Partners has abandoned plans for a $1-billion fund. The decision has created a brouhaha in the VC world and might prompt some large institutional investors to rethink plans to invest more capital with venturists in 2001--especially in the case of smaller, newer funds.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just 12 months after U.S. Search.com went public, the Marina del Rey-based information firm was floundering and badly in need of capital. With its shares trading under $5, tapping the stock market for more money seemed out of the question. So Chief Executive Brent N. Cohen decided to try another cash source: venture capital funds. Cohen found a willing investor in Pequot Capital Management of Westport, Conn., which agreed to inject as much as $27.5 million in the firm. Like U.S. Search.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | Barbara Murphy
Two Ventura County computer firms have combined to form a new company specializing in document imaging and systems management. Rick Ruffinelli, president of Ventura Computer Services Inc., and Earl Needham and Albert McCartney, owners of The Quest Group, have formed VCS in Ventura to offer a variety of high-tech computer services. Document imaging enables businesses to convert anything that is on paper to electronic data that is accessible by computer.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | MARLA DICKERSON and DENISE GELLENE and LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Do entrepreneurs need a detailed business plan to get the attention of venture capital firms? No, according to a panel of top-flight venture capitalists, or VCs, who discussed what might be the question of the moment for start-up businesses at last week's Los Angeles Venture Assn. conference. In fact, many panelists said they do not want to see business plans because they haven't time to read them. They said they prefer a two-to-five-page summary that covers the key elements of a proposal.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1989
List includes only common stocks and reflects stock splits and dividends. Not included are stocks whose 1988 closing price was below $2. Close ($) Yr. to date Stock Dec. 30, '88 % change VCS 4.75 +3,700 Occupational Medical 2.00 +966.7 Mikron Instruments 3.75 +650.0 HOH Water Technology 3.938 +518.8 Triangle Industries 55.50 +516.7 Polar Molecular 3.8125 +510.0 Phoenix Group 3.0 +500.0 Utilitech 2.156 +475.0 Puroflow 2.687 +437.5 Diagnostek 5.625 +4.
BUSINESS
October 9, 2000 | DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just 12 months after U.S. Search.com went public, the Marina del Rey-based information firm was floundering and badly in need of capital. With its shares trading under $5, tapping the stock market for more money seemed out of the question. So Chief Executive Brent N. Cohen decided to try another cash source: venture capital funds. Cohen found a willing investor in Pequot Capital Management of Westport, Conn., which agreed to inject as much as $27.5 million in the firm. Like U.S. Search.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
Some of the Tech Coast's most prominent venture capitalists had some advice for entrepreneurs at a meeting of the Southern California Software Council: Assume we've heard your pitch before. Carrie Stone, a partner with La Jolla-based Enterprise Partners, said her firm receives 5,000 business plans a year but decides to fund only about two dozen. Other venture capitalists said they are just as picky.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur Dong's "Claiming a Voice" is a stirring, illuminating one-hour documentary celebrating the 20th anniversary of Visual Communications, the country's oldest Asian Pacific media-arts organization, headquartered in a downtown loft. It will screen Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Japan America Theater in Little Tokyo as part of V.C.'s anniversary program. Dong, the gifted maker of such films as "Sewing Woman," "Lotus" and "Forbidden City, U.S.A.," combines interviews with such V.C.
SPORTS
November 8, 2001 | Chris Dufresne
The bowl championship series standings may be a riveting must-read for anyone who has ever put pinky to pocket calculator, but they don't give you the whole scoop. One must delve deeper in evaluating this month's romp toward two national title berths, so we here at command central have come up with the VCS (Very Cerebral Stuff) to provide the real dirt on the Rose Bowl race. Why do we need the VCS? "Because things change by the hour in college football," Texas Coach Mack Brown said this week.
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