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SPORTS
July 22, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no sign of oil floating anywhere, but beneath the surface Alaska is ill at ease. Up here on the western side of the Gulf of Alaska, into one of the greatest densities of sea life in the world, is where the oil came. Winter froze the tar balls, many of which were ground into sand by storms. It's business as usual again at the Afognak Wilderness Lodge. The sportfishing has returned to normal--returned, according to one qualified assessment, from "the biggest boomer year in history."
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SPORTS
July 22, 1990 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no sign of oil floating anywhere, but beneath the surface Alaska is ill at ease. Up here on the western side of the Gulf of Alaska, into one of the greatest densities of sea life in the world, is where the oil came. Winter froze the tar balls, many of which were ground into sand by storms. It's business as usual again at the Afognak Wilderness Lodge. The sportfishing has returned to normal--returned, according to one qualified assessment, from "the biggest boomer year in history."
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NEWS
October 19, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Below-zero temperatures and shifting winds continued to threaten three stranded whales Tuesday as rescuers readied for a dangerous, go-for-broke attempt to free the animals. The effort has become a race against time, complicated by the wind, bitter cold and shifting ice. Observers said that the young California gray whales were tired and at least one has pneumonia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1990 | STEVE EMMONS
Eighteen months ago when they selected Newport Beach for their conference, three University of Massachusetts scientists had no idea how appropriate the choice would become. Today, while workers sweep spilled crude oil from Newport's beaches, the conference will discuss the latest in oil pollution cleanup technology and policies. And the featured speaker, signed up for more than a year, will be Peter Leathard, president of the company in charge of the cleanup in Newport and Huntington Beach.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phillip Mamatas was awakened at 2:30 a.m. Saturday by an unusual business phone call. Someone wanted to place an order for 100 rain suits, 100 hard hats, 24 pairs of rubber boots and 20 eyewash bottles--and they wanted them delivered to Long Beach on the double. Despite the odd hour, Mamatas, president of Century Safety Instruments & Supply Corp. in Orange, was not surprised by the call when he heard who the customer was. It was Southwest VECO Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1990 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under fire from some local officials for moving too quickly to abandon beach cleanup efforts after this month's 394,000-gallon oil spill, the president of the company organizing most of the crews Tuesday defended the decision to cut back on workers, saying very little is left to do. "We have completely wound down," said Peter Leathard, president of VECO Inc., the same company that organized the cleanup of last year's 11-million-gallon Exxon spill near Valdez, Alaska.
NEWS
February 14, 1990 | TED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After days of back-breaking work along oil-stained Orange County beaches, Mark Smith began to show signs of wear Tuesday. "It's labor, labor, labor," said Smith, 27, a Compton resident hired to swab the sand with cloth squares. "I've never worked this hard." About 700 workers were added to the cleanup effort Tuesday, bringing the total to about 1,100. Another 450 to 500 are expected to be working after training today, according to officials at Southwest VECO Inc.
NEWS
October 25, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
The Archimedean Screw Tractor, a $650,000, 11-ton, one-of-a-kind mechanical beast, came out of six years of hibernation and plowed through ice 18 inches thick Monday as it prepared to join an extraordinary attempt to free two California gray whales trapped in Arctic ice. But weather was beginning to close in on the scores of rescuers. Snow was falling, reducing visibility to the point that helicopter flights out to the whales had to be curtailed.
NEWS
October 26, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Two Soviet ships attacked the task of freeing two California gray whales within hours after arriving here Tuesday, and officials held high hopes that, by the end of today, the whales will be freed from the ice that has been their prison for nearly three weeks. "The Russians have landed, and they are hitting the ice right now," biologist Ron Morris told reporters shortly after visiting the ships. The main obstacle, an ice ridge, was offering little resistance to the heavy Soviet ships.
NEWS
October 24, 1988 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Two Soviet icebreakers were en route to Point Barrow Sunday to join in a rescue effort that began as a humble attempt to help three stranded whales but has turned into a bizarre extravaganza that seems to have a life of its own. "I hope people realize that this thing ain't about whales any more," one bewildered official groaned as the rescue attempt teetered toward turning into a theater of the absurd.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1989 | PATRICK LEE, Times Staff Writer
Exxon Corp. said Monday that cleaning up the massive oil spill in Alaska could cost about $1.3 billion, making it one of the most expensive environmental disasters in history and clearly the most costly oil spill mop-up. The March 24 spill by the Exxon Valdez is expected to cost the company itself $880 million, and the company's insurers are expected to pick up the tab for an additional $400 million in cleanup expenses.
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