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March 3, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Ved Mehta is a man of the world because he had no choice. Blind since age 4, rootless since his teens, Mehta, a California-educated native of India and author of 18 wide-ranging books, has lived on three continents through the whims of history and personal fate.
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BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | Benita Eisler, Benita Eisler is the author of biographies of Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Byron and Chopin.
Since the early 19th century, well-off Americans have fled hot cities for cooler second homes, often passed on through generations of the same family. But it's fair to say that no other "Summer Domiciles" -- as the Social Register once listed them -- confer anything like the status of places on the Northeast coast of the United States. Two seasonal memoirs pay homage to the particular mystique of Maine islands.
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BOOKS
April 2, 1989 | Joseph Prabhu, Prabhu teaches philosophy at California State University, Los Angeles
"With the publication of this, the sixth book, I feel that the series (of autobiographical books) has a manifest architecture, and am therefore emboldened to give it the name I have carried so long in my head: 'Continents of Exile.' " That is how Mehta prefaces this book.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blinded at the age of 4 as a result of meningitis, at a time when the sightless in his native India were generally considered uneducable, Ved Mehta not only managed to receive an education but also developed a remarkably visual style of writing that led many readers to assume he was one of the sighted.
BOOKS
January 16, 1994 | Carter Revard, Carter Revard is a 1952 Rhodes Scholar (Oklahoma and Merton). His book of poems, "An Eagle Nation," was published by the University of Arizona Press last year
This seventh volume of Ved Mehta memoirs tells of his Oxford years (1956-59). Having made his way from India to Arkansas, where he attended a school for the blind, he then by brilliance, charm and drive earned a degree with honors from Pomona College. His dream, though, was to go on to Oxford and (if he could take first-class honors there) to become a great academic or a great political figure.
NEWS
September 24, 2001 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Blinded at the age of 4 as a result of meningitis, at a time when the sightless in his native India were generally considered uneducable, Ved Mehta not only managed to receive an education but also developed a remarkably visual style of writing that led many readers to assume he was one of the sighted.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | Benita Eisler, Benita Eisler is the author of biographies of Georgia O'Keeffe and Alfred Stieglitz, Byron and Chopin.
Since the early 19th century, well-off Americans have fled hot cities for cooler second homes, often passed on through generations of the same family. But it's fair to say that no other "Summer Domiciles" -- as the Social Register once listed them -- confer anything like the status of places on the Northeast coast of the United States. Two seasonal memoirs pay homage to the particular mystique of Maine islands.
BOOKS
May 17, 1998 | JEREMY BERNSTEIN, Jeremy Bernstein was a New Yorker staff writer from January 1962 to January 1993. He is the author of numerous books, including "In the Himalayas" and "A Theory for Everything."
It is almost certainly true that more books have been written about the New Yorker than about any other magazine. In 1959, James Thurber wrote "My Years With Ross," his bittersweet memoir about Harold Ross, the magazine's co-founder and first editor. More recently, Thomas Kunkel wrote "Genius in Disguise," a splendid biography of Ross. Brendan Gill and E.J. Kahn Jr.
NEWS
July 31, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Amolok Ram Mehta, 91, a population control specialist whose efforts to educate his blind son became the subject of a book by the son, has died of a heart attack in New Delhi. Ved Mehta's "Daddyji," published in the United States in the late 1960s, was about the life of his father, who retired in 1951 as the deputy director-general of government health services.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Ved Mehta, an author and staff writer for The New Yorker since 1961, has been named a writer in residence at Yale University. The author will be a fellow for three years at Berkeley College, one of Yale's 12 colleges for undergraduates, the university announced Monday. He will teach a course on creative writing in the fall and on nonfiction next spring.
BOOKS
May 17, 1998 | JEREMY BERNSTEIN, Jeremy Bernstein was a New Yorker staff writer from January 1962 to January 1993. He is the author of numerous books, including "In the Himalayas" and "A Theory for Everything."
It is almost certainly true that more books have been written about the New Yorker than about any other magazine. In 1959, James Thurber wrote "My Years With Ross," his bittersweet memoir about Harold Ross, the magazine's co-founder and first editor. More recently, Thomas Kunkel wrote "Genius in Disguise," a splendid biography of Ross. Brendan Gill and E.J. Kahn Jr.
BOOKS
January 16, 1994 | Carter Revard, Carter Revard is a 1952 Rhodes Scholar (Oklahoma and Merton). His book of poems, "An Eagle Nation," was published by the University of Arizona Press last year
This seventh volume of Ved Mehta memoirs tells of his Oxford years (1956-59). Having made his way from India to Arkansas, where he attended a school for the blind, he then by brilliance, charm and drive earned a degree with honors from Pomona College. His dream, though, was to go on to Oxford and (if he could take first-class honors there) to become a great academic or a great political figure.
BOOKS
April 2, 1989 | Joseph Prabhu, Prabhu teaches philosophy at California State University, Los Angeles
"With the publication of this, the sixth book, I feel that the series (of autobiographical books) has a manifest architecture, and am therefore emboldened to give it the name I have carried so long in my head: 'Continents of Exile.' " That is how Mehta prefaces this book.
NEWS
March 3, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Ved Mehta is a man of the world because he had no choice. Blind since age 4, rootless since his teens, Mehta, a California-educated native of India and author of 18 wide-ranging books, has lived on three continents through the whims of history and personal fate.
BOOKS
October 17, 2004 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The Red Letters My Father's Enchanted Period Ved Mehta Nation Books: 196 pp., $22.95 In "The Red Letters," the 11th and final book of Ved Mehta's family history, "Continents of Exile," the author struggles to come to terms with his father's two-year affair in the early 1930s with a close family friend, Auntie Rasil. "This series," writes Mehta in an afterword, "is predicated on the notion that the more particular a story, the more universal it is."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2005 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Eleanor Gould Packard, the grammarian for the New Yorker magazine for 54 years whose search for logic, clarity and correct usage in sentences won her grateful as well as grudging admirers among the staff, has died. She was 87. She died Sunday. Her family did not give the cause of death. The first, last and only grammarian at the magazine got her start there in 1945 after sending a letter asking about job openings. In it she pointed out several errors she found in a recent issue.
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