Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVegetarian
IN THE NEWS

Vegetarian

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
January 18, 2010 | By Barbara Lewis
My blood test results arrived in the mail last year -- and I was shocked. My report, with total cholesterol listed at 248, contained a handwritten note from my doctor in the margin: Come in to see me for medication. How could I have high cholesterol? I had been a vegetarian most of my life. I wasn't overweight. I exercised several times a week on the treadmill. And although high cholesterol can be genetic, I knew that my mother never had high cholesterol, and my father, who died in 1994, was never treated for cholesterol.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | Mary MacVean
A vegetarian diet may help lower blood pressure, researchers who reviewed data from 39 previous studies said Monday. The researchers suggested that a vegetarian diet could be an alternative to drugs for people whose blood pressure is too high -- a condition known as hypertension and one that is a risk factor for heart disease and other problems.  About a third of Americans have high blood pressure. Seven clinical trials, with 311 participants, and 32 observational studies, including 21,604 people, were analyzed by researchers from Japan and the Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, which advocates for plant-based diets.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1986
Well done! Calendar Letters' reply to Rachel Rosenthal's letter (Dec. 7) is surely the cretinism of the year. It breaks new ground in areas The Times has until now timidly skirted: editorial peevishness, desperate witlessness and thundering irrelevance. Your point about Hitler is, of course, the most devastating, since nutritionists and metaphysicians have proven that prolonged vegetarianism leads inevitably to funny mustaches and membership in white supremacist groups. And I am much assured by the logic: Anti-vegetarians are not fascists because a fascist was a vegetarian!
FOOD
February 14, 2014 | Jonathan Gold
Have you ever tried the beets and berries at Rustic Canyon? Because the dish is kind of mind-blowing when you think about it, a mess of roasted beets and purple quinoa in a rustic pottery bowl. There are herbs scattered over the top, and a few crisply roasted pistachios, and a few chunks of buttery, ripe Reed avocado, along with a seedy smear of slightly unripe mashed berries that seems to be there more for its fragrance and acidity than for any particular flavor. There may be a hint of dairy, and I seem to remember a version of this dish with creamed horseradish, but it could probably pass as one of those vegan feel-good bowls at a place like Real Food Daily or Café Gratitude - at least until you realize that you have powered your way to the bottom without half realizing it, and that the berries are doing unspeakably wonderful things to the avocado and that this may be the first bowl of quinoa you have eaten with pleasure since the last time you went to Peru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
I've been a vegetarian for most of my life, which means that over the years I've been subjected to plenty of unsolicited opinions about my health and my decision to stop eating meat. There were epic battles with my grandmother, who grew up on a hog farm in Minnesota and believes eating animals is part of human nature. "It has to do with teeth," is her cryptic explanation. My other grandmother, a New Yorker with a New Age streak, insists that I need beef, chicken and fish even more than most people because of my blood type.
FOOD
May 14, 1992
Just want you to know how much I enjoy your Food Section. You have provided some interesting alternatives to meat-based meals. It is not always easy to find vegetarian meals that are interesting and flavorful. I appreciate your increased attention to this issue. I also find the nutritional breakdown very helpful. D. SCHATT, Palos Verdes
OPINION
July 29, 2004
Re "Echoes of Abu Ghraib in Chicken Slaughterhouse," Commentary, July 25: Peter Singer and Karen Dawn have adroitly compared the abuses at Pilgrim's Pride slaughterhouse with those at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. One difference between the two is that the driving force behind the suffering that takes place in slaughterhouses rests on the shoulders of U.S. consumers who eat meat. Consumers can eliminate this misery from their plates by choosing a vegetarian diet. And with today's ever-growing selection of delicious, cruelty-free alternatives to meat, eggs and dairy products, it has never been easier to make the compassionate choice.
OPINION
November 24, 2005
Re "No Kidding: Americans Acquiring Taste for Goat," Nov. 21 While "some California farmers see gold in goat," I see unnecessary slaughter, heart disease and cancer, and a waste of resources. Raising animals for human consumption compromises the air, water and land where the animals live. Eating meat contributes to the chronic diseases that have become epidemic in developed countries. And with so much killing in the world, why people continue to pay others to kill living beings for them is beyond me. More peace-loving people are choosing a nonviolent, healthy, Earth-sustaining vegetarian diet.
NEWS
April 15, 1990
Regarding the dilemma of the Jewish Family Services serving non-kosher food for financial reasons: a well-planned lacto-ovo-vegetarian menu (containing dairy and eggs but no flesh) would provide the required one-third of the U.S. (recommended daily allowance) per meal and avoid the meat/dairy clashes, while substantially reducing the costs for the program. With no meat, kosher or not, as a part of that meal, the caterer, the diners, and our planet would all benefit. ALICE BASINGER Los Angeles
BUSINESS
May 9, 1999
The letter from Darren Roberts ["Taco Bell and the Afterlife," Letters, April 11] in response to the story of a Hindu man who sued Taco Bell after biting into a bean burrito containing meat was scary. Mr. Roberts' ignorance of Hindu values and his intolerance for religious beliefs other than his own are the kinds of views that lead to abhorrent hate crimes such as dragging people behind trucks. In typical carnivore fashion, he belittles the pain of the vegetarian who inadvertently eats meat.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
Ethan Brown held up one of his ready-to-eat vegetarian chicken strips and peeled off stringy strands that mimicked the moist meat of the real thing. "That's the beauty. That's absolutely everything," said Brown, founder of Beyond Meat, admiring the filaments of faux chicken at a cafe near the company's El Segundo headquarters. The company gets close to creating that authentic but elusive texture by blasting soy and pea proteins through an alternating cascade of high heat and high pressure in a stainless steel machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
The inflatable puppy in a hot dog bun was designed to turn heads and stop traffic. And no doubt it would on so many other corners, in so many cities other than this one. Even at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, it was a bit odd to see a bunned, 10-foot-long dog lying on its side, with big black eyes and a belly striped with ketchup and mustard. But was it any odder, really, than to walk through a web of Spider-Men - one rail-thin, one chubby, one wearing a bulging fanny pack?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
I've been a vegetarian for most of my life, which means that over the years I've been subjected to plenty of unsolicited opinions about my health and my decision to stop eating meat. There were epic battles with my grandmother, who grew up on a hog farm in Minnesota and believes eating animals is part of human nature. "It has to do with teeth," is her cryptic explanation. My other grandmother, a New Yorker with a New Age streak, insists that I need beef, chicken and fish even more than most people because of my blood type.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Can a vegetarian diet add years to your life? A new study suggests the answer could be yes. After examining the health records of 73,308 people for an average of nearly six years, researchers discovered that vegetarians were 12% less likely to die during that period than people who ate meat more than once a week. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recruited members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, who are strongly encouraged to follow a vegetarian diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By August Brown
This post has been updated. See note below for details. If there's anything we've learned about Morrissey in his years as an indie icon, it's that he takes his values seriously. So no one should have been too surprised when the animal-rights activist  canceled a planned appearance on Jimmy Kimmel's late night show Tuesday after he learned that the cast of "Duck Dynasty," A&E's reality show about a duck-hunting family business, would also be guests. Kimmel, however, took the slight a bit personally.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Stunt artiste Steve-O, of MTV hit "Jackass" fame, performed recently not in a new "Don't Try This at Home" DVD or in the "Dancing With the Stars" television series but in a video promoting vegetarianism produced by animal protection organization Farm Sanctuary. He's the narrator of " What Came Before: Meet Someone You'll Never Forget ," which describes the fate of three animals -- Nikki the pig, Symphony the chicken and Fanny the cow, all of whom escaped slaughter -- and their not-so-lucky counterparts.
HEALTH
November 9, 2009 | Emily Sohn
If you're raising a child in a vegetarian household, power struggles and awkward social issues are bound to crop up. Vegetarian parents may produce offspring who are curious about meat but worried that they will get in trouble from their folks if they eat it. That can be a stressful situation for a little kid, says Jennifer Nelson, director of clinical dietetics at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. "You need to be able to support your child in situations where he is going over to Tommy's house and Tommy's family is not vegetarian," Nelson says.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Veggie Grill, the chain of vegetarian restaurants based in Santa Monica,  is planning to double its store count within 18 months. In the first half of the year, branches are set to open in Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and Seattle. The company said it more than doubled its locations last year to 16 eateries in California, Oregon and Washington. In its fourth round of equity fund-raising, announced Monday, Veggie Grill said it raised $20 million in common stock funding.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
When I was a diehard vegetarian a number of years ago, packaged meat alternatives were slim pickings at best. Sure, you could find the occasional veggie "burger" or "hot dog," but there was no comparison to the real thing. Burned enough times, I grew wary of anything masquerading as meat. Especially a tofu "roast" during the holidays. Meat fanatic that I am nowadays, unless a tofu roast was studded with bacon, I probably wouldn't give it a second glance. But when I saw the Holiday Hazelnut Cranberry Roast en Croute from Field Roast, I was curious . I decided to give a few of their products a try: the holiday roast (hazelnut-infused grain "meat" stuffed with Field Roast sausage, ginger, cranberries and apples, then wrapped in puff pastry)
Los Angeles Times Articles
|