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Vegetarian Diet

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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | Mary MacVean
A vegetarian diet may help lower blood pressure, researchers who reviewed data from 39 previous studies said Monday. The researchers suggested that a vegetarian diet could be an alternative to drugs for people whose blood pressure is too high -- a condition known as hypertension and one that is a risk factor for heart disease and other problems.  About a third of Americans have high blood pressure. Seven clinical trials, with 311 participants, and 32 observational studies, including 21,604 people, were analyzed by researchers from Japan and the Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, which advocates for plant-based diets.
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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | Mary MacVean
A vegetarian diet may help lower blood pressure, researchers who reviewed data from 39 previous studies said Monday. The researchers suggested that a vegetarian diet could be an alternative to drugs for people whose blood pressure is too high -- a condition known as hypertension and one that is a risk factor for heart disease and other problems.  About a third of Americans have high blood pressure. Seven clinical trials, with 311 participants, and 32 observational studies, including 21,604 people, were analyzed by researchers from Japan and the Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, which advocates for plant-based diets.
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NEWS
April 1, 1990
Mathis Chazanov's poignant story (Times, March 18) that escalating costs have brought to an abrupt end (one agency's) provision of kosher meals for the elderly could have a happy ending after all. The sponsoring Jewish Family Service's senior nutrition program need only change to an all vegetarian, vegan (non-dairy) menu to keep costs down while still conforming to kosher requirements and, at the same time, adding to the longevity of the seniors who consume the meals. Senior citizens should note that progressive epidemiologists, nutritionists and physicians are, in increasing numbers, advocating a grain-centered, fiber-rich diet for health and longevity.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Can a vegetarian diet add years to your life? A new study suggests the answer could be yes. After examining the health records of 73,308 people for an average of nearly six years, researchers discovered that vegetarians were 12% less likely to die during that period than people who ate meat more than once a week. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recruited members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, who are strongly encouraged to follow a vegetarian diet.
FOOD
January 2, 1986
A vegetarian diet may be higher in fat than those containing meat if not carefully designed, warns the California Dietetic Assn. (CDA), Los Angeles District. "A good vegetarian diet--one that provides all nine of the essential amino acids making up complete proteins--is based on the nutrient-based food group system consisting of milk, meat or meat alternates, vegetables and fruits and breads and cereals," said Rita Storey, RD, president of CDA.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | MARY MacVEAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fully a quarter of the diners at Charlie Trotter's elegant restaurant in meat-and-potatoes Chicago order the vegetable "degustation," at $55. Fifty-five dollars for what amounts to, French name and artful cooking aside, plates of veggies. Neither Trotter nor his restaurant is vegetarian. Nor is he alone among cooks who are finding professional satisfaction and profit in produce, cashing in on vegetarianism's cachet as the politically correct, personally healthy diet of the moment.
HEALTH
December 14, 1998 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
No, a vegetarian diet isn't just alfalfa sprouts and tofu. A vegetarian diet can be much richer in its variety--and a lot tastier, too--than some nonvegetarians assume. Above all, it can be a very healthful way to eat. Most vegetarian diets are high in fiber and low in fat and cholesterol. Therefore, they can help you lower your risk of heart disease, lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and decrease digestive problems, including bowel diseases, gallstones and colon cancer.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Can a vegetarian diet add years to your life? A new study suggests the answer could be yes. After examining the health records of 73,308 people for an average of nearly six years, researchers discovered that vegetarians were 12% less likely to die during that period than people who ate meat more than once a week. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recruited members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, who are strongly encouraged to follow a vegetarian diet.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | VALERIE ORLEANS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I think what's interesting about being a vegetarian is that people often focus on what we can't eat rather than what we can," said Christie Wood of Anaheim, a vegetarian for 12 years. "Every once in awhile someone will wave a hamburger in front of me as if to show me what I'm missing. The truth is, I don't miss it. I'm completely uninterested in eating meat." Wood is one of 300 members of the Orange County chapter of EarthSave, a national group promoting vegetarianism.
OPINION
October 4, 2012
Re "FDA too slow to approve biotech foods?," Oct. 2 At Farm Sanctuary, where I am the senior director for strategy, we provide lifelong care to more than 1,000 farm animals, and we know them as individuals with personalities. Most Americans would recoil at manipulating the genes of dogs to change their flesh for human consumption, but there is no ethical or rational difference between eating a dog and eating a pig. Noted ethologist Jane Goodall explains: "Farm animals feel pleasure and sadness, excitement and resentment, depression, fear and pain.
OPINION
October 4, 2012
Re "FDA too slow to approve biotech foods?," Oct. 2 At Farm Sanctuary, where I am the senior director for strategy, we provide lifelong care to more than 1,000 farm animals, and we know them as individuals with personalities. Most Americans would recoil at manipulating the genes of dogs to change their flesh for human consumption, but there is no ethical or rational difference between eating a dog and eating a pig. Noted ethologist Jane Goodall explains: "Farm animals feel pleasure and sadness, excitement and resentment, depression, fear and pain.
NATIONAL
November 24, 2010 | Reuters
Polar bears are likely to lose out to grizzly bears in fierce competition for food as climate change drives the two species into shared habitat, biologists have concluded. A study released Tuesday was based on 3-D computer modeling that compared the skull and jaw strength of the two bruins and found polar bears ill-suited to the tougher chewing demands posed by the largely vegetarian diet of their grizzly cousins. The study, funded by the National Science Foundation, was conducted by evolutionary biologists at UCLA and published in an online journal of the Public Library of Science.
NEWS
November 4, 2010 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
Lowering cholesterol is a concern of many people, some of whom turn to statins to do the job. But a new study finds that adding monounsaturated fats to an already low-cholesterol diet may improve cholesterol levels as well. The small study included 24 men and women with cholesterol levels that were mildly to moderately high who were on a month-long monitored diet low in saturated fat. After that, some were randomly assigned for a second month to a vegetarian diet -- also monitored -- that was either high or low in monounsaturated fats.
NEWS
April 22, 2007 | Laurie Goering, Chicago Tribune
It's not easy being a meat eater in India, the world center of vegetarianism. With nearly 200 million strict vegetarians and an additional half a billion people who only rarely sample meat, India caters to vegetarians as the norm. Most supermarkets are vegetarian. So are many roadside restaurants, their signs touting "Veg," "Pure Veg" or "100 Percent Vegetarian" cuisine. In India, it is meat eaters, not vegetarians, who must comb the menu to find something appealing.
HEALTH
September 16, 2002 | Benedict Carey
Vegetarian Resource Group www.vrg.org Overview: This nonprofit group is devoted to spreading the word about vegetarianism and health. The Web site functions as a store, news source and all-purpose guide for vegetarians as well as those considering forsaking animal products. What works: For all the evidence that a vegetarian diet protects us against disease and obesity--we're talking about fruits, vegetables and beans, after all--there's still the matter of nutrition.
HEALTH
October 30, 2000 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
Longtime vegetarians have put up with the scorn of meat-eaters for decades. But no more. Now, those who adhere to a plant-based diet are firmly in the mainstream. The interest in vegetarianism has grown quietly and without much fanfare, in response to all the talk about lowering fat content in our diet and eating more whole grains, legumes, fruits and vegetables.
HEALTH
September 16, 2002 | Benedict Carey
Vegetarian Resource Group www.vrg.org Overview: This nonprofit group is devoted to spreading the word about vegetarianism and health. The Web site functions as a store, news source and all-purpose guide for vegetarians as well as those considering forsaking animal products. What works: For all the evidence that a vegetarian diet protects us against disease and obesity--we're talking about fruits, vegetables and beans, after all--there's still the matter of nutrition.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When 14-year-old Katie Blackwell goes to a fast-food restaurant with her friends, she orders a hamburger with extra cheese--then asks them to hold the meat. In the school cafeteria, she buys bean burritos instead of burgers. And when she has dinner at a friend's house, she eats only what she can digest--in good conscience--on her vegetarian diet.
HEALTH
March 6, 2000 | MARNELL JAMESON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fourteen years later, Kevin McDuff still remembers the criticism he faced when people learned he was going to raise his infant daughter as a vegetarian, like himself. "The biggest question was, 'Why are you forcing this on her?' " says the 46-year-old Granada Hills computer consultant. The second-biggest question, he says, was, "Is she getting everything she needs?" The questions, though personal, reflected valid concerns.
NEWS
February 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Want to lose weight? Try following the back and forth of the Great Nutrition Debate, a government-sponsored face-off Thursday of America's leading diet gurus. The exercise was guaranteed to leave you exhausted. At one end was cardiologist Robert Atkins, promoter of the wildly popular high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that lets people eat omelets, bacon and bun-less burgers. "It's easy to follow. You're never hungry," he said.
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