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HEALTH
December 14, 1998 | BARBARA J. CHUCK
No, a vegetarian diet isn't just alfalfa sprouts and tofu. A vegetarian diet can be much richer in its variety--and a lot tastier, too--than some nonvegetarians assume. Above all, it can be a very healthful way to eat. Most vegetarian diets are high in fiber and low in fat and cholesterol. Therefore, they can help you lower your risk of heart disease, lower your blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and decrease digestive problems, including bowel diseases, gallstones and colon cancer.
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SCIENCE
February 24, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
A vegetarian diet may help lower blood pressure, researchers who reviewed data from 39 previous studies said Monday. The researchers suggested that a vegetarian diet could be an alternative to drugs for people whose blood pressure is too high -- a condition known as hypertension and one that is a risk factor for heart disease and other problems.  About a third of Americans have high blood pressure. Seven clinical trials, with 311 participants, and 32 observational studies, including 21,604 people, were analyzed by researchers from Japan and the Physicans Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, which advocates for plant-based diets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By August Brown
This post has been updated. See note below for details. If there's anything we've learned about Morrissey in his years as an indie icon, it's that he takes his values seriously. So no one should have been too surprised when the animal-rights activist  canceled a planned appearance on Jimmy Kimmel's late night show Tuesday after he learned that the cast of "Duck Dynasty," A&E's reality show about a duck-hunting family business, would also be guests. Kimmel, however, took the slight a bit personally.
FOOD
February 14, 2014 | By Jonathan Gold
Have you ever tried the beets and berries at Rustic Canyon? Because the dish is kind of mind-blowing when you think about it, a mess of roasted beets and purple quinoa in a rustic pottery bowl. There are herbs scattered over the top, and a few crisply roasted pistachios, and a few chunks of buttery, ripe Reed avocado, along with a seedy smear of slightly unripe mashed berries that seems to be there more for its fragrance and acidity than for any particular flavor. There may be a hint of dairy, and I seem to remember a version of this dish with creamed horseradish, but it could probably pass as one of those vegan feel-good bowls at a place like Real Food Daily or Café Gratitude - at least until you realize that you have powered your way to the bottom without half realizing it, and that the berries are doing unspeakably wonderful things to the avocado and that this may be the first bowl of quinoa you have eaten with pleasure since the last time you went to Peru.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1986
Rachel Rosenthal isn't the only one who will not be buying Colman Andrew's upcoming opus. And speaking of reminders, Hitler was a Nazi vegetarian, not a fascist. G. PERREAU Los Angeles
FOOD
February 8, 1996
You hit a raw nerve with your article "Getting to the Meat of the Vegetarian Issue" (February 1). If telling a story with no point feels wrong to you, how about telling a story with a point: Humans oppress every other living thing on this planet. Man's inhumanity to man is nothing compared to what is done every day to destroy and exploit not only our environment but the "lesser" beings that share this planet with us. The question is not "Does it think" or "Does it reason." The question is "Does it suffer?"
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
A vegetarian activist said he was not trying to convince people to stop eating beef when he said on Oprah Winfrey's talk show that an outbreak of mad cow disease "could make AIDS look like the common cold." Howard Lyman, a former rancher and defendant with Winfrey in a lawsuit filed by Texas cattlemen, testified in Amarillo that he was simply expressing his opinion on the April 1996 show. "This is the United States of America. Don't I have a right to express my opinion?" he asked.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
It isn't every day that Pamela Anderson shares billing with Pythagoras. But that was just one of many oddities on display Tuesday outside the Hollywood Post Office, where the blond bombshell joined former game-show host Bob Barker to promote postage stamps featuring famous vegetarians. The limited-edition sheet of 20 44-cent stamps produced and sold by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, makes for an unusual assemblage — linking Anderson, Barker, Woody Harrelson and Joan Jett to Pythagoras, Mohandas Gandhi, Leonardo da Vinci and Leo Tolstoy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A resolution encouraging schools to offer a vegetarian option on lunch menus was approved by the state Assembly on Monday. The resolution, by Assemblyman Joe Nation (D-San Rafael), was approved 65-11. It calls on state education and health officials to develop a school lunch menu plan that includes vegetarian meals prepared without meat products, and vegan options that exclude meat, eggs and dairy. The menu plans would be voluntarily phased in over four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1991 | JOHN H. LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of vegetarian activists think they should be able to flush their toilets, wash their cars and water their lawns as they please, even if mandatory water rationing has arrived in Los Angeles. Want to know why, meat eaters? "By not eating beef one day a week for a month, you will save 10,400 gallons a month," said Aaron Leider, organizer of a program called "Meatless Monday," which encourages Los Angeles residents to do without beef on at least one day of the week.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2013 | By David Pierson
Ethan Brown held up one of his ready-to-eat vegetarian chicken strips and peeled off stringy strands that mimicked the moist meat of the real thing. "That's the beauty. That's absolutely everything," said Brown, founder of Beyond Meat, admiring the filaments of faux chicken at a cafe near the company's El Segundo headquarters. The company gets close to creating that authentic but elusive texture by blasting soy and pea proteins through an alternating cascade of high heat and high pressure in a stainless steel machine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
The inflatable puppy in a hot dog bun was designed to turn heads and stop traffic. And no doubt it would on so many other corners, in so many cities other than this one. Even at Hollywood Boulevard and Highland Avenue, it was a bit odd to see a bunned, 10-foot-long dog lying on its side, with big black eyes and a belly striped with ketchup and mustard. But was it any odder, really, than to walk through a web of Spider-Men - one rail-thin, one chubby, one wearing a bulging fanny pack?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
I've been a vegetarian for most of my life, which means that over the years I've been subjected to plenty of unsolicited opinions about my health and my decision to stop eating meat. There were epic battles with my grandmother, who grew up on a hog farm in Minnesota and believes eating animals is part of human nature. "It has to do with teeth," is her cryptic explanation. My other grandmother, a New Yorker with a New Age streak, insists that I need beef, chicken and fish even more than most people because of my blood type.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Can a vegetarian diet add years to your life? A new study suggests the answer could be yes. After examining the health records of 73,308 people for an average of nearly six years, researchers discovered that vegetarians were 12% less likely to die during that period than people who ate meat more than once a week. Researchers from Loma Linda University in California recruited members of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, who are strongly encouraged to follow a vegetarian diet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By August Brown
This post has been updated. See note below for details. If there's anything we've learned about Morrissey in his years as an indie icon, it's that he takes his values seriously. So no one should have been too surprised when the animal-rights activist  canceled a planned appearance on Jimmy Kimmel's late night show Tuesday after he learned that the cast of "Duck Dynasty," A&E's reality show about a duck-hunting family business, would also be guests. Kimmel, however, took the slight a bit personally.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Stunt artiste Steve-O, of MTV hit "Jackass" fame, performed recently not in a new "Don't Try This at Home" DVD or in the "Dancing With the Stars" television series but in a video promoting vegetarianism produced by animal protection organization Farm Sanctuary. He's the narrator of " What Came Before: Meet Someone You'll Never Forget ," which describes the fate of three animals -- Nikki the pig, Symphony the chicken and Fanny the cow, all of whom escaped slaughter -- and their not-so-lucky counterparts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996
Santa Monica College vegetarians are having a cow. A controversy has been simmering for months between student vegetarians and campus administrators, but the dissolution last week of the Vegetarian Club as a student activity was the unkindest cut of all, said Ryan Flegal, who takes his meals politically. Now the cows aren't the only ones mad. On Tuesday, some members of the former club carried placards and demonstrated in the campus' Free Speech Area.
BUSINESS
January 28, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Veggie Grill, the chain of vegetarian restaurants based in Santa Monica,  is planning to double its store count within 18 months. In the first half of the year, branches are set to open in Los Angeles, Orange County, San Diego and Seattle. The company said it more than doubled its locations last year to 16 eateries in California, Oregon and Washington. In its fourth round of equity fund-raising, announced Monday, Veggie Grill said it raised $20 million in common stock funding.
NEWS
December 15, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
When I was a diehard vegetarian a number of years ago, packaged meat alternatives were slim pickings at best. Sure, you could find the occasional veggie "burger" or "hot dog," but there was no comparison to the real thing. Burned enough times, I grew wary of anything masquerading as meat. Especially a tofu "roast" during the holidays. Meat fanatic that I am nowadays, unless a tofu roast was studded with bacon, I probably wouldn't give it a second glance. But when I saw the Holiday Hazelnut Cranberry Roast en Croute from Field Roast, I was curious . I decided to give a few of their products a try: the holiday roast (hazelnut-infused grain "meat" stuffed with Field Roast sausage, ginger, cranberries and apples, then wrapped in puff pastry)
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