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Vehicle Equipment

BUSINESS
November 11, 1992 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Transportation Safety Board on Tuesday recommended that all Boeing B-737 airplanes be fitted with a redesigned rudder part, manufactured in Irvine, because the part has been found to malfunction and could cause flight problems. The board said the rudder part is not known to have resulted in any injuries to passengers or damage to airplanes. The malfunction was discovered during a routine preflight check by a pilot, the board said.
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NEWS
December 18, 2000 | MYRON LEVIN and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Safety features developed decades ago by the tire industry to keep treads from peeling off have not been used in most standard lines of tires, including models implicated in recent fatal accidents. Safety advocates say that many of those deadly crashes might have been prevented had tire makers used these simple and inexpensive devices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1993 | THOM MROZEK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Van Nuys man has become the first person in Los Angeles to be sentenced under a new state law requiring twice-convicted drunk drivers to equip their vehicles with a device that prevents the engine from being started if the driver has been drinking, prosecutors said Tuesday. Murray J. Greenfield, 48, pleaded no contest Monday to drunk driving in an incident Sunday in which he nearly collided with a police car at Sherman Way and Rubio Avenue in Van Nuys, said Deputy City Atty. Harvey Crespy.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
At first glance, it might appear that the most valuable cargo in Mark E. Gassei's white Toyota truck are the long rolls of wall covering he carries to show clients. But inside the cab, Gassei--who heads his own home improvement company in Granada Hills--has more than $4,000 in fancy electronic accessories, including an elaborate stereo, a mobile telephone and an alarm to protect the equipment from thieves. "I'm sure all of this stuff would intimidate my mother," Gassei quipped.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1987 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Aided by motorists' seeming insatiable appetite for electronic devices that blink, blare and warn, automotive gadgets have come a long way since the days of curb feelers and cruise control. But the market is a turbulent one, due to changing consumer tastes and styles.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1998 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American motorists spent almost $20 billion last year to improve the appearance, power and performance of the vehicles that inhabit their garages, a new study reports. Fueled in part by a growing number of new enthusiasts whose loyalties lie with imported cars, the boom in so-called specialty automotive aftermarket spending has outpaced inflation for most of the last decade.
AUTOS
April 30, 2003 | Jeanne Wright, Special to The Times
The AAA is collecting old batteries nationwide as part of its campaign to protect public health and the environment from potentially dangerous injuries and contamination from used batteries. Last year AAA clubs collected more than 15,000 batteries. The current AAA Great Battery Roundup has been extended through Saturday at 65 drop-off sites in Southern California. A list of locations can be found on the club's Web site, www.aaa-calif.com, or call (800) 400-4222 for more information.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1989 | JEFF YIP, Times Staff Writer
CHATSWORTH Six summers ago, Jim Davis, president of B&M Automotive Products, settled into the driver's seat of a 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle and stomped on the gas pedal. Under the hood was a supercharger, a pump that forces extra air into the engine and can boost the horsepower by 40% to 60%. He still remembers the exhilarating speed and raw power. "The first thing that impressed me was that when you just barely touched the throttle, you could literally feel the horsepower," said Davis, 54.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Passengers on a charter bus that crashed in the eastern Sierra Nevada said Saturday that the bus had broken down several times before it tumbled off a narrow mountain highway, killing one and injuring 46. "I think they should have sent a new bus," said passenger Hector Lopez, a businessman from Puerto Rico vacationing with his wife. "I am not a mechanic, but we should not have been on that bus."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2004 | Regine Labossiere, Times Staff Writer
Ryan Friedlinghaus had a love for transforming ordinary cars into flamboyant metal sculptures with supercharged engines, $8,000 tire rims and intricate, airbrushed paint jobs. So, six years ago, Friedlinghaus opened his car-customizing garage, hoping to find customers desiring souped-up cars in a city popularized by famous rappers and movies featuring tricked-out rides.
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