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NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton administration today will propose rules to eliminate 90% of the pollutants from the diesel smokestacks of 18-wheelers, heavy-duty construction trucks and passenger buses beginning in 2006. The proposed regulations, regarded by some environmentalists as the toughest yet for big diesel-powered vehicles, contain two key components. First, the rules would require petroleum refiners to cut 97% of the amount of sulfur now found in their diesel fuels.
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NEWS
March 1, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it will proceed with plans to cut diesel exhaust from big trucks and buses by 95%, maintaining a major Clinton administration rule that environmentalists worried President Bush would try to weaken. Shortly after taking office, Bush ordered a review of all regulations approved in the final weeks of the Clinton administration.
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NEWS
March 1, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday that it will proceed with plans to cut diesel exhaust from big trucks and buses by 95%, maintaining a major Clinton administration rule that environmentalists worried President Bush would try to weaken. Shortly after taking office, Bush ordered a review of all regulations approved in the final weeks of the Clinton administration.
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton administration today will propose rules to eliminate 90% of the pollutants from the diesel smokestacks of 18-wheelers, heavy-duty construction trucks and passenger buses beginning in 2006. The proposed regulations, regarded by some environmentalists as the toughest yet for big diesel-powered vehicles, contain two key components. First, the rules would require petroleum refiners to cut 97% of the amount of sulfur now found in their diesel fuels.
SCIENCE
September 12, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Consider this next time you're sitting in traffic on the freeway: You're in a zone where air pollution can be five to 10 times higher than in surrounding areas. Even inside your vehicle, you're probably breathing in pollutants through the windows or the air vents. After an hourlong commute, you've likely doubled your daily exposure to the harmful particles in vehicle exhaust. A new study says the single best thing you can do to protect yourself is roll up the windows and set your vehicle's ventilation system to 'recirculate.' Using that setting -- typically a button that shows a car with an arrow inside -- can cut pollution concentrations inside a typical car to 20% of on-road levels, scientists found.
NEWS
December 1, 1996 | Reuters
Carbon monoxide poisoning from motor vehicle exhaust causes more deaths in parts of the country where winters are coldest, federal health officials said Friday. Many people die of carbon monoxide poisoning starting a vehicle in a garage, mistakenly thinking that opening the door or windows provides enough fresh air to avoid the risk, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2001
Re "LAX Sidewalks Must Be Smoke-Free," Voices, July 21: Marc Strassman really needs to get a grip. It seems to me that secondhand cigarette smoke exposure at LAX is trivial compared to vehicle exhaust exposure for the five to 15 minutes that are required to catch a ride upon arrival. If cigarette smoke is really such a burden, take two steps upwind and be done with it. The exercise will do you good. Dave Perrone West Hollywood
NEWS
June 1, 1998 | Reuters
Authorities here lifted a five-day smog alert Sunday and threatened legal action against nine firms for allegedly failing to cut back on emissions or denying access to inspectors during the alert. The statement gave no details over what the likely sanctions would be. City Hall said the smog alert was lifted because ozone levels had fallen and weather conditions had improved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1999 | Greg Risling, (949) 574-4226
An early-morning blaze that gutted an apartment garage Monday may have been caused when an automobile exhaust pipe ignited a mattress, authorities said. No one was injured in the fire, but two vehicles inside the garage were badly damaged. The fire began about 12:45 a.m. at an apartment in the 4100 block of Hilaria Way. Firefighters responded to a 911 call placed by one of the people who lives in the apartment.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Honda Unveils Clean-Burning Car: The Japanese car maker announced at the L.A. Auto Show that it will market a gasoline-powered car that meets the Ultra Low Emission Vehicle exhaust standards of the state Air Resources Board two years before the deadline. The standard, part of the state's series of mandates to lower air pollution from vehicles, requires such extremely low-polluting cars in auto makers' California fleets by model year 2000.
SCIENCE
December 13, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Smog is an irritation for anyone living in Los Angeles, but exactly where in the city you live can make a huge difference in your in your exposure to the tiniest air pollutants , a new study has found. The study by UCLA researchers compared four Los Angeles neighborhoods and found striking disparities in levels of air pollutants known as ultrafine particles, even over short distances. A zone of the Westside neighborhood of Mar Vista that sits downwind of Santa Monica Airport, for instance, has much higher levels of those pollutants in the air than the Eastside's freeway-choked Boyle Heights, according to the study . UCLA researchers drove an electric Toyota RAV4 equipped with air pollution monitors through residential streets in Boyle Heights, downtown, West Los Angeles and a part of Mar Vista known as North Westdale.
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