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AUTOS
February 20, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
For the first time since 2005, the estimated number of people killed in the U.S. by car crashes went up, according to the National Safety Council. Vehicle crashes killed an estimated 36,200 people in 2012, according to a council report released Tuesday. That's a 5% increase from 2011, making it the first time the number of deaths has risen since 2004 to 2005. Much of the increase can be attributed to more people on the roads, according to the report. "Total miles driven across the nation have been on the rise since December of 2011," the report said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
AUTOS
February 20, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
For the first time since 2005, the estimated number of people killed in the U.S. by car crashes went up, according to the National Safety Council. Vehicle crashes killed an estimated 36,200 people in 2012, according to a council report released Tuesday. That's a 5% increase from 2011, making it the first time the number of deaths has risen since 2004 to 2005. Much of the increase can be attributed to more people on the roads, according to the report. "Total miles driven across the nation have been on the rise since December of 2011," the report said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1989 | TRACY WOOD, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County authorities say they will levy fines on the holder of a $50-million vehicle repair and maintenance contract, the biggest ever awarded by the county in its program of turning government work over to private enterprise. Only five months into the five-year contract, officials say county services have been disrupted by long delays in repairing and maintaining the county's huge fleet of cars, trucks and prisoner buses. The contractor, Holmes and Narver Services Inc.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2010 | By Jerry Hirsch
Toyota Motor Corp. said Monday that it has a repair to stop one cause of unintended acceleration that has led to a recall of eight of its most popular vehicles. The Japanese automaker has briefly stopped selling and manufacturing the vehicles and has recalled more than 4 million worldwide to fix the gas pedal problem. Toyota has also recalled cars because of a floor mat issue. Here's what owners of the affected autos need to know. When can I expect to receive instructions on how I can get my gas pedal fixed?
BUSINESS
July 7, 1990 | From United Press International
After a four-month trial, a Los Angeles Superior Court jury Friday ordered General Electric to pay more than $64 million to American Aviation Industries, an AAI spokeswoman said. But General Electric, in turn, was awarded $9 million to $10 million on its countersuit in the same trial, according to AAI spokeswoman Diane Rumbaugh, who said punitive damages against General Electric, the Fairfield, Conn.-based conglomerate, have yet to be determined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998 | SUE FOX
Donald Wachter, an Agoura Hills man whose father was charged and his brother convicted in separate auto repair scams in the past, has been convicted of grand theft in an auto repair swindle of his own, City Atty. James Hahn said. Wachter, the operator of Mr. Don's Transmission shop in Van Nuys, was found guilty Monday after a six-day trial in the Los Angeles Municipal Court's Metropolitan Branch. He faces a maximum of one year in jail and a $1,000 fine when he is sentenced Oct. 22.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vehicle owners may be paying more for smog repairs beginning Sunday as part of a statewide program to crack down on air pollution from emissions. Smog Check II, created by legislation and carried out by the Department of Consumer Affairs, is designed to force owners of vehicles that emit high amounts of pollutants to "make repairs or get them off the road," said Lance Barnett, the department's interim director.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | Bloomberg News
State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. said it will temporarily stop requiring the use of generic parts after a jury deciding an Illinois class action ordered it to pay customers $456 million, saying State Farm broke a pledge to pay for replacement parts of "like kind and quality." State Farm has defended the less-costly replacements as a way to cut insurance premiums. But it said Thursday that it wants to avoid "customer confusion" that could result from "misinformation" linked to the suit.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1999 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The lack of a $1 part cost Maria Taylor $2,000. Taylor, a San Francisco resident, knew her car had a leaky oil gasket that needed to be replaced. But she figured taking the car to a mechanic would be costly and time-consuming. Besides, she always left repair shops with the vague feeling that she'd been ripped off. So she procrastinated. Eventually, she got to a mechanic--but only after her car's engine seized up on the freeway, having run out of oil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | SOLOMON MOORE
A criminal complaint has been filed against an auto repairman accusing him of grand theft and insurance fraud after a sting operation by state authorities. The investigation was triggered by a woman who complained to the state Bureau of Automotive Repair that Liberty Auto Center operator Mark Nodd billed her insurance company for car repairs that were never done, said Deputy City Atty. Mark Lambert. The shop, which was located in the 9500 block of DeSoto Avenue, has since moved, Lambert said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2002 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 50-year-old man was hospitalized with second-degree burns, and nearly two dozen people were displaced when fire destroyed a six-unit condominium complex in Santa Paula on Tuesday afternoon, fire officials said. The fire started about noon at the two-story Monterey condominiums in the 200 block of West Santa Barbara Street, said Capt. John Harber of the Santa Paula Fire Department. The four upper units were gutted, and two lower units were damaged by water, Harber said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Highway Patrol said Thursday that it may have solved the mystery of the slippery freeways. The culprit? An MTA bus leaking oil. At least 15 times over the past 10 days, transition roads linking the Ronald Reagan Freeway with the Golden State and San Diego freeways had been covered with a slippery substance, according to CHP Officer Wendy Moore. The substance was blamed in a minor injury accident Nov. 7, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2000
The California Highway Patrol said Thursday it may have solved the mystery of the slippery freeways. The apparent culprit? An MTA bus leaking oil. At least 15 times over the past 10 days, transition roads linking the Ronald Reagan Freeway with the Golden State and San Diego freeways were covered with a slippery substance, according to CHP Officer Wendy Moore. The substance was blamed for a minor injury accident Nov. 7, she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 2000 | KAREN ROBINSON-JACOBS
Have wrench, will travel. Eager to inspire more customer loyalty in an increasingly competitive marketplace, Toyota Motor Sales USA and General Motors have recently begun testing a service that could save some consumers a trip to the mechanic. Late last year, Toyota of Glendale became one of only three Toyota dealerships in the nation to participate in a pilot program in which some light auto repairs, especially warranty and recall work, can be done at the customer's home or office.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year, millions of cars, vans and pickups are recalled for safety-related repairs under a federal law designed to cut the toll of injuries and deaths on the nation's highways. But 30% of these vehicles never get fixed, staying on the road, safety defects and all. Such defects are not always life-threatening, and often do not lead to failures, but not correcting them can and does lead to serious injuries, as James Jerra can attest.
BUSINESS
October 31, 1999 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The lack of a $1 part cost Maria Taylor $2,000. Taylor, a San Francisco resident, knew her car had a leaky oil gasket that needed to be replaced. But she figured taking the car to a mechanic would be costly and time-consuming. Besides, she always left repair shops with the vague feeling that she'd been ripped off. So she procrastinated. Eventually, she got to a mechanic--but only after her car's engine seized up on the freeway, having run out of oil.
BUSINESS
May 10, 1997 | Associated Press
Alabama's highest court ruled that BMW should pay $50,000, not $2 million, for failing to tell a buyer that his car's paint had been damaged and retouched. The case--which had become a rallying cry for critics of big jury awards--had been sent back to the state Supreme Court by the U.S. Supreme Court, which said the $2-million punitive damage award was "grossly excessive."
BUSINESS
June 26, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ex-Sears Auto Mechanic Sues: Jerry Waddy, who says he was fired because he refused to cheat customers, has filed a $1-million wrongful discharge suit. His attorney, Paul Wotman, said the San Mateo County suit is the first such action against Sears since California and New Jersey officials uncovered allegedly fraudulent practices at its auto centers.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1999 | Bloomberg News
State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. said it will temporarily stop requiring the use of generic parts after a jury deciding an Illinois class action ordered it to pay customers $456 million, saying State Farm broke a pledge to pay for replacement parts of "like kind and quality." State Farm has defended the less-costly replacements as a way to cut insurance premiums. But it said Thursday that it wants to avoid "customer confusion" that could result from "misinformation" linked to the suit.
NEWS
October 5, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major setback for the auto insurance industry, a jury in Illinois on Monday ordered the nation's largest car insurer to pay $456 million for cheating millions of customers by ordering body shops to fix their cars with low-cost generic replacement parts. The award against State Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance could grow much larger if the judge in the case grants lawyers' requests for an additional $4 billion to satisfy fraud claims. The judge is expected to rule later this week.
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