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BUSINESS
January 9, 2007 | From Reuters
The government wants to change its car safety ratings by strengthening crash tests and promoting collision avoidance technology that automakers are adopting, Transportation Secretary Mary E. Peters said Monday. The agency's proposal calls for improving frontal crash tests so that they would measure how a person's upper legs are affected in a collision. The new approach would also assess how side air bags protect a driver's head.
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AUTOS
October 10, 2013 | By Ken Bensinger and Jerry Hirsch
A Los Angeles County jury has awarded $10 million to the family of an Upland woman whose 2006 Toyota Camry accelerated out of control and crashed, killing her. But in an unexpected twist, the verdict came entirely against a woman, Olga Belo, who crashed into the Toyota, setting off the accident. Toyota was absolved of any responsibility by the jury. "To get a $10-million verdict for a 66-year old woman ... is a great verdict," said Garo Mardirossian, attorney for the family of Noriko Uno, who died at the wheel in August 2009.
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BUSINESS
July 9, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
U.S. regulators are overhauling a program for rating vehicle safety, including new crash tests that make it tougher for automakers to earn the highest grades. The changes starting with 2010 models include more challenging front- and side-crash measures that will be incorporated with rollover-test results into a single rating, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Tuesday.
AUTOS
October 4, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Add it to the long list of things affected by the government shutdown: vehicle recalls. With the shutdown entering its fourth day on Friday, the number of recalls has slowed to a trickle, with only one automaker opting to announce a recall voluntarily. Traditionally, announcing vehicle recalls is the duty of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, an arm of the Department of Transportation. Like many government-funded entities, NHTSA has had to dramatically curtail its operations since the federal government shutdown on Tuesday.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After five years of fending off government investigations into a rash of steering column fires, Ford Motor Co. in April 1996 announced the largest safety recall in automotive history, agreeing under pressure to replace the ignition switches in 8 million cars, trucks and vans. Ford's action came too late for Prakash Krishan, a 31-year-old mother of three.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
Chrysler announced Thursday that it is recalling some 2013 Chrysler 200 and Dodge Avenger cars built from Oct. 30, 2012, through Nov. 2, 2012. The automaker said 1,785 of the cars may have a broken control valve in the fuel-tank assembly. The problem could result in an engine stall and potentially a crash if a car would stall while it is being driven. The same problem could result in a fuel leak, which might lead to a fire if the leak reaches an ignition source. Chrysler said it will notify owners of the affected vehicles, and that dealers will inspect the fuel-tank assembly and replace any defective control valves for free.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Brian Thevenot
Automakers issued 586 safety recalls for more than 16.2 million vehicles last year, slightly higher than the previous year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced Thursday. Most recalls start with consumer complaints, the NHTSA said in a release. Last year, the agency received 41,912 complaints concerning potential safety defects, compared with 49,417 in 2011 and 65,765 in 2010. "The role of the consumer in influencing auto recalls cannot be underestimated," NHTSA Administrator David Strickland said in the release.
BUSINESS
June 6, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A panel of international safety experts agreed Friday that vehicle mismatches in crashes are a growing worldwide concern but that more research is needed before design or regulatory changes should be imposed on auto makers. More than a dozen safety officials from North America, Europe and Asia gave their views on vehicle compatibility at a meeting here organized by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The discussion was prompted by recent U.S.
AUTOS
March 21, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety regulators have unveiled an iPhone app that allows people to get safety ratings and recall information for vehicles they own or are thinking of buying. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration SaferCar app will let users search its 5-Star Safety Ratings for vehicles by make and model, locate car seat installation help, file a vehicle safety complaint, find recall information and subscribe to automatic notices about vehicle recalls. It also works on Apple's iPads and iPods.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
The number of traffic fatalities fell for the fifth year in a row in 2010, dropping 3% to its lowest level since 1949, according to estimates released by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Fatalities fell from 33,808 in 2009 to 32,788 last year, despite the fact that Americans drove nearly 21 billion miles more in 2010 than in the year before. That works out to about 1.09 deaths for every 100 million miles traveled, a major drop from 1972, when traffic deaths peaked at 54,589 and there were 4.33 deaths for the same number of miles traveled.
AUTOS
March 21, 2013 | By Jerry Hirsch
Federal safety regulators have unveiled an iPhone app that allows people to get safety ratings and recall information for vehicles they own or are thinking of buying. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration SaferCar app will let users search its 5-Star Safety Ratings for vehicles by make and model, locate car seat installation help, file a vehicle safety complaint, find recall information and subscribe to automatic notices about vehicle recalls. It also works on Apple's iPads and iPods.
NEWS
February 21, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
Chrysler announced Thursday that it is recalling some 2013 Chrysler 200 and Dodge Avenger cars built from Oct. 30, 2012, through Nov. 2, 2012. The automaker said 1,785 of the cars may have a broken control valve in the fuel-tank assembly. The problem could result in an engine stall and potentially a crash if a car would stall while it is being driven. The same problem could result in a fuel leak, which might lead to a fire if the leak reaches an ignition source. Chrysler said it will notify owners of the affected vehicles, and that dealers will inspect the fuel-tank assembly and replace any defective control valves for free.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2013 | By Brian Thevenot
Automakers issued 586 safety recalls for more than 16.2 million vehicles last year, slightly higher than the previous year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration announced Thursday. Most recalls start with consumer complaints, the NHTSA said in a release. Last year, the agency received 41,912 complaints concerning potential safety defects, compared with 49,417 in 2011 and 65,765 in 2010. "The role of the consumer in influencing auto recalls cannot be underestimated," NHTSA Administrator David Strickland said in the release.
AUTOS
December 18, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch
Having already paid record fines for not promptly recalling cars, Toyota Motor Corp. will pay the government another $17.35 million to federal safety regulators. The latest fine, announced Tuesday, is for not promptly recalling Lexus RX 350s and RX 450h sport-utility vehicles because a floor mat on the driver's side could jam the gas pedal, causing the car to accelerate when the driver didn't intend to. “It's critical to the safety of the driving public that manufacturers report safety defects in a timely manner,” said David Strickland, head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The nation's top auto safety regulator has escalated and expanded an investigation into complaints of floor mats trapping accelerators in Ford Motor Co. vehicles. The probe has not led to any recalls, but it appears to echo recent investigations into unintended acceleration in Toyota cars, which ultimately led to massive global recalls after drivers complained of cars speeding out of control, causing injuries and deaths. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration this week upgraded the Ford defect investigation, originally launched in May 2010, to an engineering analysis, its most serious level of inquiry.
BUSINESS
January 18, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger and Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
The nation's top auto safety regulator is ill-equipped to detect problems with high-tech electronics that are increasingly commonplace in today's cars, a new government study has concluded. Calling such shortcomings "troubling," the report called on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to review its technical capabilities and appoint an advisory panel to help it evaluate potentially serious risks associated with systems such as adaptive cruise control. Despite those findings, the National Research Council found in a 162-page report that NHTSA's decision to close its investigation of sudden acceleration in Toyota Motor Corp.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The nation's top auto safety regulator has escalated and expanded an investigation into complaints of floor mats trapping accelerators in Ford Motor Co. vehicles. The probe has not led to any recalls, but it appears to echo recent investigations into unintended acceleration in Toyota cars, which ultimately led to massive global recalls after drivers complained of cars speeding out of control, causing injuries and deaths. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration this week upgraded the Ford defect investigation, originally launched in May 2010, to an engineering analysis, its most serious level of inquiry.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2011 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
Toyota Motor Corp. responded slowly and ineffectually to a growing sudden-acceleration crisis because it was hampered by a top-down management style that gave short shrift to customer complaints, a special panel has concluded. In a 60-page report, Toyota's seven-member North American Quality Advisory Panel said the company had come to regard federal safety regulators as adversaries, an attitude that may have exacerbated its response to complaints of sudden acceleration and ultimately led to recalls of more than 10 million vehicles worldwide, as well as nearly $50 million in fines against the automaker.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2011 | By Julie Mianecki, Washington Bureau
The number of traffic fatalities fell for the fifth year in a row in 2010, dropping 3% to its lowest level since 1949, according to estimates released by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Fatalities fell from 33,808 in 2009 to 32,788 last year, despite the fact that Americans drove nearly 21 billion miles more in 2010 than in the year before. That works out to about 1.09 deaths for every 100 million miles traveled, a major drop from 1972, when traffic deaths peaked at 54,589 and there were 4.33 deaths for the same number of miles traveled.
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