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NEWS
January 8, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After long negotiations between state and federal officials, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency cleared the way Thursday for California to impose more stringent automobile emission standards than those set by the federal 1990 Clean Air Act. A waiver to the act, approved despite determined opposition from automobile manufacturers, was signed Thursday afternoon by EPA Administrator William K. Reilly. The waiver allows more stringent requirements to take effect with 1994 model vehicles.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2013 | By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Despite a threefold increase in people and cars in the last 50 years, California's strict vehicle emissions standards have managed to significantly clear the state's air, according to new research. The study also found that Southern California's air chemistry has changed for the better. The amount of organic nitrates in the atmosphere - which cause smog's eye-stinging irritation - has drastically fallen off, according to federal researchers. Ozone and other pollutants have been monitored in the state since the 1960s.
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BUSINESS
September 11, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
A federal lawsuit by two industry groups aims to halt the U.S. government and the state of California from moving ahead with new greenhouse gas emissions rules for cars and trucks -- an action that, if successful, could scuttle a key piece of the Obama administration's plans to set stricter nationwide standards for vehicles. The lawsuit may be the first of many legal challenges targeting President Obama's efforts to limit the heat-trapping emissions that scientists blame for global warming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco this week upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval of caps on motor vehicle emissions, which environmental groups had argued failed to address hazardous air pollution faced by the 1.5 million people living next to Southern California freeways. The court ruled that the EPA's approval of proposed limits on the amount of motor vehicle emissions allowed in the region were adequate for the purposes of proceeding with California's transportation plans and projects.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | Associated Press
About 1,500 automobile emissions testing stations will begin operating here this month, the government newspaper El Nacional said Monday. The testing stations are the first ever in Mexico. An estimated 75% to 80% of all toxic emissions in the Mexico City metropolitan area are reportedly produced by the city's 3 million vehicles.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rarely is it so difficult for the government to get rid of money. The state's Bureau of Automotive Repair has a kitty of $100 million in pollution reduction funds that it is trying with all its might to give to qualifying California motorists. Since the program's 1999 launch, BAR has had to try and try harder still to get rid of the money, twice sweetening its offer to help California vehicle owners in the hopes of attracting more takers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California should be permitted to enact the world's toughest vehicle-emission standards to combat global warming, state Deputy Atty. Gen. Mark Melnick argued in federal court Friday. Automakers are challenging 2004 rules that set tailpipe emission standards for greenhouse gases, which are designed to cut polluting exhaust from cars and light trucks by 25% and from sport utility vehicles by 18%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco this week upheld the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval of caps on motor vehicle emissions, which environmental groups had argued failed to address hazardous air pollution faced by the 1.5 million people living next to Southern California freeways. The court ruled that the EPA's approval of proposed limits on the amount of motor vehicle emissions allowed in the region were adequate for the purposes of proceeding with California's transportation plans and projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO "Well, howdy," the voice shouted from out of the dash. "I'm Cal Worthington." Him again. "I'm here to warn you about something that's very, very important to all of us. You know, they're about to pass that new law in California that would prevent you from buying the vehicles you need and want ... let state bureaucrats push for huge new taxes on minivans, trucks and SUVs ... "This is serious. And this bill is in the fast lane for final approval ... " Little did Cal know.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The state of California sued the country's largest automobile manufacturers Wednesday, seeking billions of dollars for environmental damage caused by tailpipe emissions. It was the state's latest effort to combat the effects of greenhouse gases, which trap heat in the atmosphere and cause global warming. The lawsuit drew praise and criticism for Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, who filed it on behalf of the state.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2009 | Jim Tankersley
A federal lawsuit by two industry groups aims to halt the U.S. government and the state of California from moving ahead with new greenhouse gas emissions rules for cars and trucks -- an action that, if successful, could scuttle a key piece of the Obama administration's plans to set stricter nationwide standards for vehicles. The lawsuit may be the first of many legal challenges targeting President Obama's efforts to limit the heat-trapping emissions that scientists blame for global warming.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2009 | Ken Bensinger and Jim Tankersley
President Obama will direct the EPA today to reconsider a Bush-era decision that stopped California and more than a dozen other states from setting their own stricter limits on auto emissions, according to sources familiar with the matter. Should the agency allow a waiver from federal rules, states could require automakers to increase the fuel efficiency of cars and trucks far above current limits.
OPINION
October 24, 2007
California is expected to file suit against the United States next week in a sad jurisprudential waste of time and taxpayer money brought to you by an environmentally delinquent Bush administration. No one disputes that California has the authority under the Clean Air Act to enact environmental regulations that are stricter than federal standards.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2006 | Marc Lifsher, Times Staff Writer
The state of California sued the country's largest automobile manufacturers Wednesday, seeking billions of dollars for environmental damage caused by tailpipe emissions. It was the state's latest effort to combat the effects of greenhouse gases, which trap heat in the atmosphere and cause global warming. The lawsuit drew praise and criticism for Atty. Gen. Bill Lockyer, who filed it on behalf of the state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
California should be permitted to enact the world's toughest vehicle-emission standards to combat global warming, state Deputy Atty. Gen. Mark Melnick argued in federal court Friday. Automakers are challenging 2004 rules that set tailpipe emission standards for greenhouse gases, which are designed to cut polluting exhaust from cars and light trucks by 25% and from sport utility vehicles by 18%.
NATIONAL
August 29, 2003 | Aaron Zitner, Gary Polakovic and Elizabeth Shogren, Times Staff Writers
The Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it would not force automakers, oil companies or others to reduce "greenhouse gas" emissions from automobiles, a decision that may complicate efforts by California and other states to limit the release of carbon dioxide. The EPA denied a 1999 petition from environmental groups, which had asked the agency to use its powers under the Clean Air Act to regulate carbon dioxide and other emissions from new vehicles.
OPINION
October 24, 2007
California is expected to file suit against the United States next week in a sad jurisprudential waste of time and taxpayer money brought to you by an environmentally delinquent Bush administration. No one disputes that California has the authority under the Clean Air Act to enact environmental regulations that are stricter than federal standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2002 | George Skelton
SACRAMENTO "Well, howdy," the voice shouted from out of the dash. "I'm Cal Worthington." Him again. "I'm here to warn you about something that's very, very important to all of us. You know, they're about to pass that new law in California that would prevent you from buying the vehicles you need and want ... let state bureaucrats push for huge new taxes on minivans, trucks and SUVs ... "This is serious. And this bill is in the fast lane for final approval ... " Little did Cal know.
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