Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVeil
IN THE NEWS

Veil

FEATURED ARTICLES
SCIENCE
January 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
They've been a mystery ever since they burst onto the cosmic scene several years ago -- short-lived, red eruptions that burned brighter than novas, yet dimmer than supernovas. Not only were astronomers hard pressed to explain what caused these newly observed events, they couldn't even agree on what to call them. They've been dubbed variously as supernova imposters, V838 Mon-like events, and intermediate-luminosity red transients, or ILRTs. Now, scientists say they may have solved the mystery.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Chris Barton
Looking back from the fragmented media landscape of 2014, it's hard to imagine someone like John Lurie was ever possible. An immediately recognizable character actor who appeared in landmark indie films including Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and "Stranger Than Paradise," Lurie was also a brilliant saxophonist who helped push the boundaries of jazz in the '80s and '90s with his band, the Lounge Lizards. But Lurie was forced to give up music and acting after being stricken with advanced Lyme disease and has since switched to painting (his work has been exhibited numerous times and was collected in a 2007 book, "A Fine Example of Art")
Advertisement
OPINION
May 24, 2010
France, which gave the English language the word "nuance," is offering a nuanced justification for a bill that would outlaw "concealment of the face in public." According to President Nicolas Sarkozy, the proposed measure should not be seen as an act of hostility toward Muslim women, only a small fraction of whom wear the full-face veil. Rather, the bill is designed to protect "personal dignity, particularly women's dignity," and the openness required of citizens in a republic. This rationalization, however, needlessly complicates a simple reality.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
I don't own anything close to a complete John Tavener discography. But I do have a foot-high stack of his CDs that I happened to stumble over in a closet not long ago. It got me wondering, not for the first time, what to make of the British composer who, by strange coincidence, died at 69 on Tuesday. A lot of people over the years have wondered the same thing about Tavener's numinous music, with its flamboyant, exotic spirituality. Always wanting to weed out CDs, I first looked for some that could go. A few were still in shrink wrap; would I ever listen to them?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1997
After reading "The Veil Returns in Surge of Tradition" (May 24), about the veil worn by some women in Muslim countries, I feel compelled to write a response. As an American Muslim woman I am becoming weary of seeing the same one-dimensional issue rehashed in the media. Yes, the veil is worn by some Muslim women, and if they alone choose to be attired so and they are happy with their own decision, then more power to them. Let it be known that the Saudi clerics are relying on their own male-oriented interpretation of what a woman should wear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1986
I was pleased to read the excellent article (Sept. 25) by Don A. Schanche, "New Discoveries Helping To Lift the Veil of Mystery Surrounding Ancient Etruscans." It is interesting to note that articles relating to old "forgotten" cultures and civilizations appear more and more frequently. There is always further enlightenment, but the same question lingers: from whence came these curious people? How about Atlantis? MARGOT ELLEN CHENEY Huntington Beach
OPINION
July 19, 2010 | Gregory Rodriguez
Poor France. On Tuesday, just in time for Bastille Day, the lower house of the French Parliament overwhelmingly passed a measure aimed at changing the offensive sartorial habits of 2,000 Muslim women who critics say are a threat to French values and identity. The offending garments? The burka and the niqab, which cover the faces of a miniscule percentage of Muslim women in France (a quarter of whom are thought to have converted to Islam) and are at the center of a national debate over what it means to be French.
NEWS
April 29, 1990
Re "Garbo: A Veil Lifts" (April 24): The major reason I abandoned the study of journalism in college was the merciless prying into private lives that seemed necessary to create newspaper readership. To make a good story better, the privacy, the dignity, the pride and often the reputation of the story's victim had to be exposed to the lust and idle curiosity of readers. In publishing the painful photograph of the aged and ailing Greta Garbo, you violated the most fervent wish of the once great and incredibly beautiful actress: the wish for privacy.
TRAVEL
June 24, 2007
Karen Kingsley DiNatale of Van Nuys visited Venice, Italy, in February during busy Carnavale season, when there were "a great cast of characters walking around with masks," she said. But on her last morning in the city, the streets were deserted. As she and her sister were boarding a vaporetto (water taxi), she snapped a few shots. This one caught the mood of Italy's capital of romance. She used a 35mm Nikon One Touch Zoom.
OPINION
March 17, 2002
Re "Ouster of Priest Marks a Change in O.C. Diocese," March 5: Once again, and perhaps never in a more glaring way, does the hypocrisy of organized religion confound and mystify. The outrage expressed by some members of the congregation over Michael Pecharich's forced departure because he "transgressed the personal boundaries of an adolescent," and their contention that it should have been handled privately, only perpetuate the Roman Catholic veil of secrecy on sexual abuse by priests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2013 | By David Ng
John Kenneth Tavener, the renowned British composer whose spiritual, religious-inspired music drew a diverse fan base that included the Beatles and Prince Charles, has died at age 69. Tavener died Tuesday at his home in Dorset, England, said his publisher, Chester Music. No cause of death was given, but Tavener had been living with Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that contributed to his unusual height -- he stood 6 feet, 6 inches tall -- and also weakened his heart. PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2013 Tavener's ambitious pieces featured orchestral and choir compositions that were both haunting and emotional in nature.
SPORTS
May 24, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - It's a little benefit of a win streak the Angels pushed to six with a 5-2 victory over the Kansas City Royals in Kauffman Stadium on Friday night, but it's definitely one they've noticed. The veil of negativity that hovered over the club for the first seven weeks of the season seems to have finally lifted. "All the questions we got at the beginning of the year - When is this team going to turn it around? What's it going to take? What's it going to look like?
NATIONAL
May 15, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Authorities have arrested a 25-year-old man in connection with the killing of five people in northern Nevada, officials said  Wednesday. “This was senseless,” Lyon County Sheriff Allen Veil said at an afternoon news conference. “The taking of the lives of five people for a motive yet to be determined. No matter what it is, it's senseless.” Jeremiah Bean, 25, of Fernley, Nev., was arrested Monday and booked on two counts of burglary, authorities said. He was being held Tuesday at Lyon County Jail, they said.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
In perhaps the worst-kept secret in theme park history, the Disneyland Paris resort has finally admitted that the long-rumored Ratatouille trackless dark ride will open in 2014. Photos: Ratatouille dark ride at Disneyland Paris Conspicuously under construction for more than a year and rumored since 2009 or earlier, the new attraction will be based on the Oscar-winning Disney/Pixar film that tells the tale of a rat named Remy who dreams of becoming a renowned French chef. With an estimated budget of  $150 million, the new attraction at the Walt Disney Studios theme park in France is expected to feature trackless ride vehicles with 3-D projections and special effects.
NEWS
March 1, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
No stranger to scandal, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, the former International Monetary Fund head, has failed in his attempt to get a court in Paris to ban an upcoming veiled memoir by a former mistress, the Guardian reports . Strauss-Kahn, who resigned in 2011 after being accused of sexually assaulting a hotel maid (a charge of which he was later cleared), was seeking to block a book by law professor and Libération columnist Marcela Iacub, his lover of seven months.  The book is titled "Belle et Bête," which translates as either "Beauty and the Beast" or "Beautiful and Stupid.
OPINION
February 6, 2013 | By Amrit Singh
When John Brennan, the White House counter-terrorism advisor, appears Thursday at confirmation hearings to become the CIA's next director, Americans will have a rare opportunity to learn new details about the intelligence agency's secret rendition and detention program. Brennan served in the CIA while the George W. Bush administration was "rendering" terrorism suspects - nabbing them off streets around the world to be secretly detained and interrogated, sometimes using torture, while in the custody of the CIA or foreign governments.
HOME & GARDEN
October 30, 2010 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
The loved ones of Ada Johnson lived a lot closer to death than most Americans do today. When she died, her body was prepared by family and servants. Her coffin was placed in the parlor of her home, where relatives mourned and friends came to call. Perhaps a photo was taken. Locks of her hair likely were twirled into flowers and added to a wreath or made into jewelry. Miss Johnson was imaginary, the star of last weekend's Halloween and Mourning Tours at the Heritage Square Museum, giving more than 700 visitors a sense of how people in Victorian times coped with death.
OPINION
July 26, 2010
An 'honest meal' Re "Restaurant closure hard to swallow," July 22 As a downtown resident, I have to say that the trendy new restaurants where every item is served a la carte and in tiny portions at inflated prices can't compare to Edward's Steak House. As a boy, my parents took me to Edward's on Alvarado. I will never forget the gracious servers or the nice old man in the parking lot who always helped customers find a space — not to mention the delicious, juicy steaks.
SCIENCE
January 25, 2013 | By Monte Morin
They've been a mystery ever since they burst onto the cosmic scene several years ago -- short-lived, red eruptions that burned brighter than novas, yet dimmer than supernovas. Not only were astronomers hard pressed to explain what caused these newly observed events, they couldn't even agree on what to call them. They've been dubbed variously as supernova imposters, V838 Mon-like events, and intermediate-luminosity red transients, or ILRTs. Now, scientists say they may have solved the mystery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 11, 2013 | By Amy Reiter
Elimination Night A Novel Anonymous New Harvest: 304 pp., $25 If the anonymous author of "Elimination Night," set behind the scenes of a singing-competition TV show very much - perhaps exactly - like "American Idol," is difficult to identify, the same cannot be said of most of the novel's characters. There's "erect-nippled" British judge Nigel Crowther, a.k.a. "Mr. Horrible," a pop producer who made a name for himself on "Project Icon" with his sneering, metaphorical insults.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|