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Velcro

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NATIONAL
July 30, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook, Tribune Washington Bureau
If Ronald Reagan was the classic Teflon president, Barack Obama is made of Velcro. Through two terms, Reagan eluded much of the responsibility for recession and foreign policy scandal. In less than two years, Obama has become ensnared in blame. Hoping to better insulate Obama, White House aides have sought to give other Cabinet officials a higher profile and additional public exposure. They are also crafting new ways to explain the president's policies to a skeptical public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
May 11, 2013 | Roy Wallack, Gear
"How do I make this old bike go faster?" That refrain, heard frequently among the teeming masses riding from downtown to the beach in last month's CicLAvia and sure to be repeated again at the next one on June 23, has one obvious answer (work out more, dude) and three not-so-obvious ones: Oil the chain, adjust the seat to the proper height (so there's a slight bend in your knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke) and get some "clip-in" cycling shoes and pedals. Snapped into matching pedals via a step-in cleat you attach to a port on the bottom, clip-in shoes include a stiff sole and the ability to pull up as well as push down, thereby providing a huge mechanical advantage that transfers more of your energy into the crank.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The lights were down low in Sylvester Stallone's Beverly Hills office on a recent afternoon so it was impossible to see the 64-year-old movie star's eyes behind his plum-tinted sunglasses. His snug Italian suit emphasized his still-muscular frame as he sat ramrod straight. His face doesn't move much, either, so he seemed like a statue, until he started recounting the moment when he knew that he was becoming expendable. "It was that first Batman movie," he said, referring to the 1989 film starring Michael Keaton, an actor never known for biceps.
SCIENCE
June 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Ever wonder how cockroaches and lizards can disappear from sight so quickly. A new study by researchers at UC Berkeley indicates that they can run off a ledge at full speed, grasp the edge, and swing around to the bottom of platform or leaf and keep running, hidden from larger predators that cannot carry out such a complicated maneuver. The discovery has inspired the development of miniature robots, or microbots, that can mimic their behavior, the team reported in the journal PLoS One. Biologist Robert J. Full said researchers first observed the behavior when they were filming cockroaches running at high speeds up an inclined track with a gap in it. They expected the cockroaches to jump the gap and continue on up the ramp.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2008
A simple low-cost solution for hands-free driving ("Arming yourself for hands-free phoning," June 8): Place smooth strip of velcro on back of cellphone. Place hook strip toward top of steering wheel. Use speaker phone and, voila, success. Been there and doing that! Irv Snyder Laguna Woods
SCIENCE
June 6, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Ever wonder how cockroaches and lizards can disappear from sight so quickly. A new study by researchers at UC Berkeley indicates that they can run off a ledge at full speed, grasp the edge, and swing around to the bottom of platform or leaf and keep running, hidden from larger predators that cannot carry out such a complicated maneuver. The discovery has inspired the development of miniature robots, or microbots, that can mimic their behavior, the team reported in the journal PLoS One. Biologist Robert J. Full said researchers first observed the behavior when they were filming cockroaches running at high speeds up an inclined track with a gap in it. They expected the cockroaches to jump the gap and continue on up the ramp.
HEALTH
June 1, 2012 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Music may be the ultimate performance-enhancing drug. It makes long runs shorter, big hills smaller and hard stuff easier. In fact, studies have shown it can speed your warm-up by raising your heart rate, motivating you to move faster, even enhancing your coordination. On the other hand, wearing earbuds can be dangerous - and illegal - for cyclists and runners because they can seal out ambient sound; in fact, Florida and Rhode Island prohibit headphone use in any vehicle; California, Maryland, and Delaware legally limit their use to one ear. Here's some innovative, sports-friendly sound systems that either get around those legal limitations or stay in place better, making them safer and more convenient ways to feel the beat.
NEWS
October 15, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Whether you want a bit of cushioning for yoga on the go or a compact ground cover for outdoor activities, the TMAT Pro fits the derriere. Measuring 21 by 29 inches (it's not meant for lying full length), the neoprene mat rolls tightly into a 6-by 4-inch-diameter bundle, secured by an integrated Velcro strap closure. The quick-drying mat comes in neon colors and patterns, and fits in a purse or carry-on bag. TMAT Pro costs $24.95. Info: TMAT Pro , (866) 759-2888.
HEALTH
May 11, 2013 | Roy Wallack, Gear
"How do I make this old bike go faster?" That refrain, heard frequently among the teeming masses riding from downtown to the beach in last month's CicLAvia and sure to be repeated again at the next one on June 23, has one obvious answer (work out more, dude) and three not-so-obvious ones: Oil the chain, adjust the seat to the proper height (so there's a slight bend in your knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke) and get some "clip-in" cycling shoes and pedals. Snapped into matching pedals via a step-in cleat you attach to a port on the bottom, clip-in shoes include a stiff sole and the ability to pull up as well as push down, thereby providing a huge mechanical advantage that transfers more of your energy into the crank.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1993
Well, we had a Teflon President. Now, it appears, we have a Velcro President! ROBERT G. KANE West Los Angeles
HEALTH
June 1, 2012 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Music may be the ultimate performance-enhancing drug. It makes long runs shorter, big hills smaller and hard stuff easier. In fact, studies have shown it can speed your warm-up by raising your heart rate, motivating you to move faster, even enhancing your coordination. On the other hand, wearing earbuds can be dangerous - and illegal - for cyclists and runners because they can seal out ambient sound; in fact, Florida and Rhode Island prohibit headphone use in any vehicle; California, Maryland, and Delaware legally limit their use to one ear. Here's some innovative, sports-friendly sound systems that either get around those legal limitations or stay in place better, making them safer and more convenient ways to feel the beat.
NEWS
October 15, 2011 | By Judi Dash, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Whether you want a bit of cushioning for yoga on the go or a compact ground cover for outdoor activities, the TMAT Pro fits the derriere. Measuring 21 by 29 inches (it's not meant for lying full length), the neoprene mat rolls tightly into a 6-by 4-inch-diameter bundle, secured by an integrated Velcro strap closure. The quick-drying mat comes in neon colors and patterns, and fits in a purse or carry-on bag. TMAT Pro costs $24.95. Info: TMAT Pro , (866) 759-2888.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook, Tribune Washington Bureau
If Ronald Reagan was the classic Teflon president, Barack Obama is made of Velcro. Through two terms, Reagan eluded much of the responsibility for recession and foreign policy scandal. In less than two years, Obama has become ensnared in blame. Hoping to better insulate Obama, White House aides have sought to give other Cabinet officials a higher profile and additional public exposure. They are also crafting new ways to explain the president's policies to a skeptical public.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Geoff Boucher, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The lights were down low in Sylvester Stallone's Beverly Hills office on a recent afternoon so it was impossible to see the 64-year-old movie star's eyes behind his plum-tinted sunglasses. His snug Italian suit emphasized his still-muscular frame as he sat ramrod straight. His face doesn't move much, either, so he seemed like a statue, until he started recounting the moment when he knew that he was becoming expendable. "It was that first Batman movie," he said, referring to the 1989 film starring Michael Keaton, an actor never known for biceps.
BUSINESS
June 15, 2008
A simple low-cost solution for hands-free driving ("Arming yourself for hands-free phoning," June 8): Place smooth strip of velcro on back of cellphone. Place hook strip toward top of steering wheel. Use speaker phone and, voila, success. Been there and doing that! Irv Snyder Laguna Woods
TRAVEL
July 29, 2007 | Andy Isaacson, Special to The Times
The well-coiffed Portuguese matador, muttering provocations in his native tongue, sizes up his weighty opponent's slavering mouth and sloping horns. In his hand he flashes his weapon: a bandarilha tipped not with razor-sharp darts but with nonlethal Velcro. The bull makes no distinction. Spectators' voices drop to murmurs. Overhead lights sparkle off the matador's gold sequins, and the smell of linguiƧa (sausage) perfumes the dusty air.
NEWS
February 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
George De Mestral, who invented the Velcro fastener 50 years ago and saw it evolve from blood pressure cuffs on Earth to manned shuttles and capsules in space, died at his home here last Thursday, his wife, Helen, said Monday. He was 82 and died of complications of bronchitis and other respiratory problems. He had been sick for about three weeks, she said by telephone from their home in this village near Lake Geneva.
HOME & GARDEN
September 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Someday, you'll replace the grungy shower door in the bathroom and attend to the paint peeling from the dining room ceiling. Inevitably too the kids will grow up and their quest for a corner of privacy in the room they share will be history. Until then, a quick fix is in order. Hook-and-loop tape, best known under the trade name of Velcro, can help in covering myriad household eyesores. It also can support fabric for a temporary room divider.
HOME & GARDEN
September 13, 1997 | From Associated Press
Someday, you'll replace the grungy shower door in the bathroom and attend to the paint peeling from the dining room ceiling. Inevitably too the kids will grow up and their quest for a corner of privacy in the room they share will be history. Until then, a quick fix is in order. Hook-and-loop tape, best known under the trade name of Velcro, can help in covering myriad household eyesores. It also can support fabric for a temporary room divider.
NEWS
December 10, 1995 | ROGER MUNNS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He helped build the jet stream. He explains that Velcro is what holds your skeleton together. And he might convince you that your vacuum cleaner would be silent if it weren't for all that noisy dirt it's sucking up. So who couldn't like Dr. Science? "I think it's people who don't have a sense of humor," he said. "I offend their sense of propriety." Dr. Science, played by Dan Coffey, has been offering scrambled science since 1982. The daily, 90-second Dr.
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