Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVelimir Ilic
IN THE NEWS

Velimir Ilic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the moments before Mayor Velimir Ilic's triumphal return Tuesday--after 43 days on the run from his own army in the forests surrounding this stronghold of democratic reform--the city's deputy mayor described him as "an F-117 Stealth fighter. He's invisible." But when Ilic took the stage Tuesday afternoon for the first opposition rally in Yugoslavia since the end of NATO's air war, and a crowd of thousands chanted "Vel-ja! Vel-ja! Vel-ja!"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 30, 1999 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the moments before Mayor Velimir Ilic's triumphal return Tuesday--after 43 days on the run from his own army in the forests surrounding this stronghold of democratic reform--the city's deputy mayor described him as "an F-117 Stealth fighter. He's invisible." But when Ilic took the stage Tuesday afternoon for the first opposition rally in Yugoslavia since the end of NATO's air war, and a crowd of thousands chanted "Vel-ja! Vel-ja! Vel-ja!"
Advertisement
NEWS
September 30, 2000 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The protest movement aimed at driving Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic from power sputtered forward Friday with rallies and a few scattered strikes. The opposition hopes to build up a full head of steam by Monday, when it has called on supporters to go on strike for five days and bring Serbia, the larger of Yugoslavia's two republics, to a standstill. But many already are asking whether the slow start has given Milosevic and his allies too much time to regroup.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As many as 1,000 troops have deserted Yugoslavia's army units in Kosovo to return to their homes, in a new sign of growing internal strains on the Balkan nation's war effort, U.S. officials maintained Wednesday. The troops, apparently reservists, left in military vehicles after hearing that Yugoslav authorities had sought to suppress antiwar demonstrations that have sprung up this week in three towns in the dominant Yugoslav republic of Serbia, the officials said.
NEWS
October 10, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Policemen used to take Velimir Ilic aside after his rants against the dictatorship at rallies in this Serbian town. But instead of the warning he expected, they whispered him secret encouragement to keep up the good work. At first, the mayor was suspicious.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|