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Velina Hasu Houston

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January 29, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five Japanese women are thrust into deepest Kansas, alongside their GI husbands, shortly after World War II. They're supposed to become a part of the great American melting pot. But when one of them shoots herself, the others are drawn to the traditional Japanese teapot.
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September 5, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
In 1955, 25 young women from Hiroshima traveled to New York to receive the most advanced reconstructive surgery available. Known as "Keloid Girls" or "Hiroshima Maidens," these bomb victims were living with horrific scarring and physical disabilities. Some had no eyelids, lips or chins; others had no use of their hands. "Calling Aphrodite," Velina Hasu Houston's spare, affecting look at these survivors, is premiering at the International City Theatre in Long Beach.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
A few years ago, playwright Velina Hasu Houston wrote a play based on a story her mother had brought to her attention a decade ago. The story was a news account of a real-life crime of passion in Japan in which a maid, thwarted in her love for her boss, a doctor, tried to poison him with a dessert she made. That play, "Cultivated Lives," was produced at the San Diego Asian American Repertory Theatre last year, and met with good critical reception. But Houston was never happy with the results.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002
Pasadena Playhouse Education and Community Outreach Program presents "The Writers' Gallery," celebrating the "new voices" for American stage, film and television today from 11:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at the Pasadena Playhouse. Panel discussions include "A Celebration of Playwrights," with Kenneth Lonergan, Bruno Kirby, Gary Socol, Velina Hasu Houston and others; and "Writing for Stage, Television and Film," with Robert Nelson Jacobs, Wil Calhoun, Peter Lefcourt and more. Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to The Times. and
At a time when provocateur-of-the-hour Spike Lee has raised hackles with "Jungle Fever," his riff on interracial coupling, Velina Hasu Houston offers a radically different perspective. Deep in the heart of Kansas, a group of Japanese women sit on traditional tatami mats, taking ceremonial tea. They include Himiko, Setsuko, Teruko and Chizuye; their last names are Hamilton, Banks, Mackenzie and Juarez.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002
Pasadena Playhouse Education and Community Outreach Program presents "The Writers' Gallery," celebrating the "new voices" for American stage, film and television today from 11:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at the Pasadena Playhouse. Panel discussions include "A Celebration of Playwrights," with Kenneth Lonergan, Bruno Kirby, Gary Socol, Velina Hasu Houston and others; and "Writing for Stage, Television and Film," with Robert Nelson Jacobs, Wil Calhoun, Peter Lefcourt and more. Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991
I found Jan Breslauer's article on playwright Velina Hasu Houston ("Hues and Cries," July 7) a welcome departure from the misguided treatment of interracial relationships portrayed in Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever." As a white male who has maintained a five-year relationship with a Japanese-American woman, I found Lee's need to reduce a black-white relationship to racial "curiosity" both offensive and hateful. By contrast, Houston appears to possess the depth needed to probe individual motivations and the consequences involved when one violates society's unwritten codes of sexual conduct.
BOOKS
January 27, 1991
As an African American, I am personally offended by the comments of Velina Hasu Houston that devalue a heritage of which I am very proud. If Houston were honest about her desire to acknowledge her multicultural heritage and desire for a multicultural census category, she would identify herself as Afro-Asian or Negro-Asian. Since the term American denotes no particular ethnic or racial classification, the American half of the Amerasian designation gives no indication of whether Houston's non-Asian heritage is Caucasian, Hispanic, black or Native American.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
Re "He Looks Like Me" (July 7): Although it was heartening to see an article about Amerasians in View, I was disappointed that The Times offered a narrow definition. The term Amerasian was coined by Pearl Buck to refer to half-Japanese and half-Korean children born either in or out of wedlock during the U. S. occupation of Japan and after the Korean Conflict. The term referred to all multiracial Asians, whether their American half was Anglo, African-American or Latino.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
In 1955, 25 young women from Hiroshima traveled to New York to receive the most advanced reconstructive surgery available. Known as "Keloid Girls" or "Hiroshima Maidens," these bomb victims were living with horrific scarring and physical disabilities. Some had no eyelids, lips or chins; others had no use of their hands. "Calling Aphrodite," Velina Hasu Houston's spare, affecting look at these survivors, is premiering at the International City Theatre in Long Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000 | SCARLET CHENG, Scarlet Cheng is a regular contributor to Calendar
A few years ago, playwright Velina Hasu Houston wrote a play based on a story her mother had brought to her attention a decade ago. The story was a news account of a real-life crime of passion in Japan in which a maid, thwarted in her love for her boss, a doctor, tried to poison him with a dessert she made. That play, "Cultivated Lives," was produced at the San Diego Asian American Repertory Theatre last year, and met with good critical reception. But Houston was never happy with the results.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
Velina Hasu Houston makes no bones about where she is coming from. "To be marginalized in the United States . . . is to have much of one's experience inadvertently or conveniently omitted from the nation's 'history,' " she writes in her introduction to the just-published "But Still, Like Air, I'll Rise: New Asian American Plays," which she has edited.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991
I found Jan Breslauer's article on playwright Velina Hasu Houston ("Hues and Cries," July 7) a welcome departure from the misguided treatment of interracial relationships portrayed in Spike Lee's film "Jungle Fever." As a white male who has maintained a five-year relationship with a Japanese-American woman, I found Lee's need to reduce a black-white relationship to racial "curiosity" both offensive and hateful. By contrast, Houston appears to possess the depth needed to probe individual motivations and the consequences involved when one violates society's unwritten codes of sexual conduct.
NEWS
July 11, 1991
Re "He Looks Like Me" (July 7): Although it was heartening to see an article about Amerasians in View, I was disappointed that The Times offered a narrow definition. The term Amerasian was coined by Pearl Buck to refer to half-Japanese and half-Korean children born either in or out of wedlock during the U. S. occupation of Japan and after the Korean Conflict. The term referred to all multiracial Asians, whether their American half was Anglo, African-American or Latino.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1991 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to The Times. and
At a time when provocateur-of-the-hour Spike Lee has raised hackles with "Jungle Fever," his riff on interracial coupling, Velina Hasu Houston offers a radically different perspective. Deep in the heart of Kansas, a group of Japanese women sit on traditional tatami mats, taking ceremonial tea. They include Himiko, Setsuko, Teruko and Chizuye; their last names are Hamilton, Banks, Mackenzie and Juarez.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1991 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five Japanese women are thrust into deepest Kansas, alongside their GI husbands, shortly after World War II. They're supposed to become a part of the great American melting pot. But when one of them shoots herself, the others are drawn to the traditional Japanese teapot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1997 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
Velina Hasu Houston makes no bones about where she is coming from. "To be marginalized in the United States . . . is to have much of one's experience inadvertently or conveniently omitted from the nation's 'history,' " she writes in her introduction to the just-published "But Still, Like Air, I'll Rise: New Asian American Plays," which she has edited.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1996
Three free playwrights' labs are being offered by the Audrey Skirball-Kenis Theatre: "Turning Life Stories Into Art," with writer-performer Sandra Tsing Loh on March 6; "Strategies and Expectations: The Playwright/Director Collaboration," with directors Roberta Levitow and Bill Reichblum on March 27; and "First Stages," for fledgling writers, with playwright Velina Hasu Houston on April 20. Reservations will be confirmed and locations will be announced two weeks prior to each lab.
BOOKS
January 27, 1991
As an African American, I am personally offended by the comments of Velina Hasu Houston that devalue a heritage of which I am very proud. If Houston were honest about her desire to acknowledge her multicultural heritage and desire for a multicultural census category, she would identify herself as Afro-Asian or Negro-Asian. Since the term American denotes no particular ethnic or racial classification, the American half of the Amerasian designation gives no indication of whether Houston's non-Asian heritage is Caucasian, Hispanic, black or Native American.
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