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Veljko Kadijevic

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NEWS
March 18, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staring into the face of a civil war, Yugoslavs took a collective deep breath Sunday while searching for an escape from the dangerous corner into which their nationalist leaders have pushed them. Dire predictions of a military coup or ethnic cataclysm have so far gone unfulfilled. That has offered a flicker of hope that the bellicose national groups have momentarily stepped back from the precipice of a conflagration, although Sunday's quiet seemed more a paralysis induced by fear.
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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
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NEWS
July 1, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yugoslavia's collective presidency, in a move that could prop up the troubled federation, resurrected itself early today and elected Croatia's Stipe Mesic as head of state. The action in the federal capital of Belgrade removed a major obstacle to working out a European-mediated peace in the disintegrating country.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Staring into the face of a civil war, Yugoslavs took a collective deep breath Sunday while searching for an escape from the dangerous corner into which their nationalist leaders have pushed them. Dire predictions of a military coup or ethnic cataclysm have so far gone unfulfilled. That has offered a flicker of hope that the bellicose national groups have momentarily stepped back from the precipice of a conflagration, although Sunday's quiet seemed more a paralysis induced by fear.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | From Reuters
Army Gen. Veljko Kadijevic is to be Yugolavia's new defense minister, the state news agency Tanjug said Tuesday. It said Kadijevic, currently deputy defense minister, will take over the post from Adm. Branko Mamula, who is due to retire this year.
NEWS
July 3, 1991 | Associated Press
Slovenia President Milan Kucan: MEE-lan KOO-chan Parliament President France Bucar: FRAHN-tsay BOO-char Foreign Minister Dimitrij Rupel: Di-MEE-tree ROO-pell Capital, Ljubljana: LYUHB-lee-ah-nah Croatia President Franjo Tudjman: FRAHN-yo TOODGE-mahn Federal Government President Stipe Mesic: STEE-pay MEH-sich Prime Minister Ante Markovic: AN-tay MAR-kaw-vich Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic: VEL-ykoh kah-DEE-yeh-vich
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Slovenian leaders said the federal army's decision to withdraw from the Yugoslav republic amounts to recognition of its independence. Croatia, meanwhile, demanded that the military leave that republic as well. Ethnic violence in Croatia left at least two dead and seven injured, reports said. Federal Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic warned in a surprise TV interview in Belgrade that the situation in the nation is "rapidly deteriorating."
NEWS
October 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Yugoslav army rejected the latest European Community peace plan and vowed to use "all available means" to crush a blockade of its barracks by rebel forces in Croatia. Defense Minister Veljko Kadijevic said the army will call up more reservists immediately to strengthen a siege of towns and ports throughout Croatia. Some of the worst fighting raged around Dubrovnik, where army forces pushed to within three miles of the medieval walled city after shelling coastal villages.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Air strikes and artillery barrages rattled Croatia on Monday in intensified fighting in Yugoslavia's 6-month-old civil war. "It's worse than hell today," a Croatian officer said from a police station in Otocac, a town in the mountains above the Adriatic Sea. "The barracks where our guards are stationed were hit by rockets from the air," he said. "A number of our guys are injured; some civilians as well."
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Declaring his job irrelevant because Yugoslavia no longer exists, Croatia's Stipe Mesic resigned Thursday as president of the disintegrating Balkan federation. The gesture was mostly symbolic, since Mesic exercised little influence in the collective presidency, which has been paralyzed by the same political, ethnic and religious strains that have broken up Yugoslavia and plunged its people into a deadly war.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | from Times Wire Services
Hopeful of international recognition, Croatia adopted key legislation Wednesday on Serbian minority rights. But fighting continued, and a U.N. envoy said obstacles remained to sending peacekeepers to the war-torn region. Meanwhile, Germany, a staunch supporter of breakaway Croatia and critic of the Serbian-dominated federal government, announced that it is halting all air transport and shipping links with Serbia and its ally, Montenegro.
NEWS
July 22, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Some federal troops began moving back from Slovenia's border areas Sunday, but they did not comply with the Yugoslav government's order to leave the secessionist republic. Meanwhile, ethnic fighting flared across Yugoslavia's other renegade republic, Croatia. At least 12 people were reported killed in the worst weekend of violence in the Yugoslav conflict.
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