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Velvet Underground Music Group

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June 20, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the drummer of the Velvet Underground, Maureen "Moe" Tucker kept the beat at the birth of "alternative" rock and had the first Hall of Fame career of any female rock instrumentalist. Hardly anyone knew it at the time: The four landmark albums the Velvets made from 1967 to 1970 were commercial flops. But they survived as crucial influences for some of the most vital rock of the '70s, '80s and '90s. David Bowie, Patti Smith, Talking Heads, R.E.M.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the drummer of the Velvet Underground, Maureen "Moe" Tucker kept the beat at the birth of "alternative" rock and had the first Hall of Fame career of any female rock instrumentalist. Hardly anyone knew it at the time: The four landmark albums the Velvets made from 1967 to 1970 were commercial flops. But they survived as crucial influences for some of the most vital rock of the '70s, '80s and '90s. David Bowie, Patti Smith, Talking Heads, R.E.M.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly 25 years after it disbanded in virtual obscurity, the Velvet Underground has returned to confront the myth that has grown around it. They are the dead painters of rock: never acknowledged during the group's lifetime, now recognized as one of the most important and influential bands of all time. But unlike Van Gogh, the original Velvets--Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen Tucker--have been able to witness their transformation from footnotes to legends.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 1993 | JEFF KAYE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly 25 years after it disbanded in virtual obscurity, the Velvet Underground has returned to confront the myth that has grown around it. They are the dead painters of rock: never acknowledged during the group's lifetime, now recognized as one of the most important and influential bands of all time. But unlike Van Gogh, the original Velvets--Lou Reed, John Cale, Sterling Morrison and Maureen Tucker--have been able to witness their transformation from footnotes to legends.
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