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September 8, 2013 | By Dan Loumena
The singing hot dog vendor at Comerica Park in Detroit has lost his job. That'd be Charley Marcuse, also known as "The Singing Hot Dog Man. " This would seem to be a bad thing, but you can be the judge via the video above. There reportedly have been complaints he is too loud. Marcuse, who also works at a men's store in Birmingham, Mich., sells Charley's Ballpark Mustard as well. But as of Friday, the food contractor Sportservice has cut ties with Marcuse, who took to Twitter to let fans know.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: Our homeowner association board is impetuous and wastes association money. The board members think homeowners have bottomless wallets. In two years, they've spent hundreds of thousands of dollars just on attorney fees and undertaking preposterous projects. The recent spate of bad legal advice includes redoing our covenants, conditions and restrictions. It's been a two-year project that has so far netted the attorney well over $90,000. The attorney advised our association that Davis-Stirling Act statutes should be embedded in our documents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2013 | By Joseph Serna and Andrew Blankstein
A Long Beach man accused of exploding a dry ice bomb at Disneyland is scheduled to appear in Orange County Superior Court on Thursday morning. Christian Barnes, 22, is being held in lieu of $1-million bail in connection with the Tuesday afternoon explosion in a Toontown trash can. The blast did little if any damage to the trash can and caused no injuries, officials said, but did spook park guests and forced Disneyland to close Toontown for two...
BUSINESS
April 25, 2014 | By Shan Li and Lalita Clozel
A new federal proposal to regulate electronic cigarettes has Patrick Sanchez pondering the future of the fledgling industry. Sanchez is the owner of Vapegoat, a Highland Park e-cigarette shop that doubles as an art gallery. On a normal night, customers kick back on his comfy couches, surrounded by brick walls hung with Salvador Dali-esque paintings, and try out new e-cig flavors. Since opening in September, Sanchez said, business has boomed as more smokers discovered the battery-operated devices, which heat liquids that usually contain nicotine to create a vapor that can be inhaled.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Barbara Demick
BEIJING -- Millions of Chinese took to the Internet to protest the execution of a 37-year-old vendor who had stabbed to death two municipal officials he said arrested and beat him for hawking meat skewers without a license. Xia Junfeng had argued that he was a poor, honest man who was only defending himself against the notoriously brutal urban management officers known in China as the chengguan -- and nearly 3 million Chinese agreed. As news of his execution by lethal injection was announced Wednesday, Chinese microblogs were flooded with outrage.
FOOD
November 11, 2011 | By David Karp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Southern California lies along an ocean that once abounded in seafood and still produces a catch of considerable quantity and diversity. Why is it, then, that so little of the fish at farmers markets is sold directly by those who catch it? Ideally, farmers market customers and managers would like a vendor to offer wild fish that is freshly caught, rather than frozen; is caught in local waters; is sold directly by the fisherman, his family or his employees; is available regularly and reliably in a diverse range of products; and is a reasonable price.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Six people were reported dead after a knife-wielding man slashed passersby Friday morning following a fight in a market in Changsha, in China's central Hunan province. Initial witness reports indicated that multiple people - perhaps members of a Turkic minority from northwestern China - were involved. That raised fears of a premeditated attack because militants from that region were implicated in a knifing rampage March 1 that left 33 dead at a train station in Kunming, China.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2010 | By Garrett Therolf, Los Angeles Times
A criminal probe into whether Los Angeles County Probation Department managers improperly steered millions of dollars in contracts to specific companies has expanded to include a second major vendor, according to county officials. Erbie Phillips, a director in a unit responsible for procurement, was placed on paid leave late last month after the FBI and Sheriff's Department officials began investigating his role in securing more than $1 million in contracts for Natural Solutions, a cleaning supplies vendor that officials believe employed him in a second job. Investigators are now looking into contracts held by Spectrum Surveillance Systems as well.
FOOD
August 17, 2012 | By David Karp
LOMPOC, Calif. - A new beef vendor at the Santa Monica farmers market, Rancho San Julian is very likely the oldest continuously operated family farm in California, dating to 1816, when José de la Guerra began to raise meat for the presidio at Santa Barbara. In 1837, the governor of Alta California granted him title to the ranch, which has remained in his family for nine generations. It currently extends over 13,000 acres of grasslands and oak forest, roamed by cougars, bears and hawks, and home to 500 Angus cows and their calves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2011 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
When the California Department of Motor Vehicles unveiled a newly designed driver's license last fall -- the first major revision in a decade -- officials touted sophisticated security features that promised to make the cards easier to use and harder to fake. The cardholder's signature and birth date would be raised, so they could be felt. Hidden images would be revealed only by ultraviolet light, and a perforated outline of the California brown bear would be visible when a flashlight was pressed against the back of the card.
WORLD
March 14, 2014 | By Julie Makinen and Barbara Demick
BEIJING - Six people were reported dead after a knife-wielding man slashed passersby Friday morning following a fight in a market in Changsha, in China's central Hunan province. Initial witness reports indicated that multiple people - perhaps members of a Turkic minority from northwestern China - were involved. That raised fears of a premeditated attack because militants from that region were implicated in a knifing rampage March 1 that left 33 dead at a train station in Kunming, China.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California farmers markets want to get tough with interlopers who don't sell what they grow. They're backing a bill to crack down on vendors who falsely claim to offer pesticide-free or locally grown fruits, nuts and vegetables. "Californians are fortunate to have the highest concentration of farmers markets in the nation," said the bill's author, Assemblyman Roger Dickinson (D-Sacramento). The bill, AB 1871, he said, would "increase consumer protections and accountability at our certified farmers markets, protect local farmers and help this growing sector of the economy continue to thrive.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Target Corp. said cyberthieves stole credentials from one of the retailer's vendors in order to access its system, according to an ongoing forensic investigation into a data breach that may have exposed information from as many as 110 million customers. The company said that since disclosing the hack Dec. 15, it cleared its system of the malware that had been planted. “In addition, since that time we have taken extra precautions such as limiting or updating access to some of our platforms while the investigation continues,” Target spokeswoman Molly Snyder said in a statement Wednesday.
FOOD
January 23, 2014 | By David Karp
The revamped Glendale farmers market launched Jan. 9 in a new location with an expanded and upgraded roster. Founded in 1992, it was formerly on Brand Boulevard, sponsored by the city, and managed by Christopher Nyerges, who also operates a School of Self-Reliance that teaches wilderness survival skills. Last year, the Downtown Glendale Assn. , a merchants and property owners group, took over the market, and this month hired a new manager, Carole Gallegos, who directs the successful Encino and South Pasadena farmers markets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By David Karp
On a recent Saturday morning, Ed Williams stood off to the side at Santa Monica's downtown farmers market, scrutinizing a bright red mango like a detective trying to solve a mystery. "It looks damaged by hot water treatment, which is only used on imported mangoes," Williams said to market supervisor Laura Avery. Pointing to tiny white specks on the fruit, he added, "I think these are dead scale insects. " Williams is deputy director of the Los Angeles County agricultural commissioner's office.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Carla Hall
One of the trickier problems in animal welfare is stopping the illegal sale of underage rabbits, kittens, turtles, birds and other exotic animals on street corners in Los Angeles. The area outside Santee Alley, the popular and densely filled open-air market for all kinds of wares downtown, has also been the venue of choice for vendors trafficking in these animals. The state of California bans the roadside sale of animals. And it's against the law to sell underage animals that are fragile and need special attention or bottle feeding.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1987 | H. G. REZA and TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
The twang--every word spoken with a nasal tone--was unmistakeable. G'Day! Here was an Aussie, four Aussies actually, being good sports and joining the festivities for Dennis Conner and his crew. C.W. Vaughn, wife Olivia, and another couple--all visiting Southern California from Melbourne--were eyeing the Stars & Stripes shirts that were being sold out of boxes at a waterfront stand. "Cedric, ask them how much is the long-sleeved shirt," Olivia said.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Chinese authorities struggled to restore order Monday after migrant workers, angry over the manhandling of a pregnant vendor, overturned police cars, smashed windows and set fires near the southern manufacturing hub of Guangzhou. It began as a run-of-the mill altercation Friday night when city authorities tried to clear the migrants, who are from Sichuan province, as they hawked produce in front of a supermarket in Zengcheng, on the outskirts of Guangzhou. But the ferocity of the rioting over the weekend exposed the fragility of social order in the nation.
OPINION
November 10, 2013
Re "Legalize the street vendors," Editorial, Nov. 8 I managed the oversight and operation of the MacArthur Park vending district, L.A.'s last attempt at legal street vending. It was funded by federal grants and was supposed to become self-sufficient. It never got close. The health and safety issues that you raise are very valid. It would take just one instance of food contamination to ruin an entire program. The main problem with the MacArthur Park program was that the illegal vendors ran rings around the legal ones; you can't compete when you have to follow the rules that others don't.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Kate Linthicum
Los Angeles is famous for its vibrant street vending culture, with sidewalk entrepreneurs hawking everything from used clothing to bacon-wrapped hot dogs. But because the city code prohibits selling things on sidewalks, vendors  face hefty fines, confiscated equipment and even incarceration . Two members of the Los Angeles City Council would like to change that. Councilman Jose Huizar, who represents the Eastside of Los Angeles, and Councilman Curren Price, whose district takes in much of South L.A., are expected to present a motion Wednesday calling for a study of how the city can legalize street vending.
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