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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
Bittersweet bite distinguishes "Things We Do for Love," now receiving an elegant local premiere at the Odyssey Theatre. Virtuoso playwright Alan Ayckbourn's Olivier-nominated dramedy limns the contradictions of passion with politically incorrect perception. "Things" rocked London in 1997 and spawned many regional readings, though some observers have found it more disturbing than delightful.
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NATIONAL
February 6, 2014 | By David Horsey
The severe drought in California and much of the West is a reminder that civilized life is a paper-thin veneer that overlays the deep upheavals of nature. Humans carry on blithely, holding fast to the illusion that the natural world can be tamed and exploited with no unavoidable consequences. Then we get slammed by a hurricane, a flood, a tornado, a wildfire, a drought or a freezing polar vortex that lets us know how wrong we are.  Yet, after each disaster, we forget again -- which is the reason so few of us give any sustained attention to the climate change peril.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Laura Collins-Hughes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Girl by the Road at Night A Novel of Vietnam David Rabe Simon and Schuster: 230 pp., $23 It was a grant that determined the form David Rabe's writing on the Vietnam War would take after he was discharged from the Army in 1967. The money was for playwriting, and with it he began the quartet of plays that would make him famous: "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel," "Sticks and Bones," "The Orphan" and "Streamers. " "But oddly enough, it was a novel rather than a play that I wanted to work on," he wrote later.
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Ray and Charles Eames started their experiments in molded plywood back in the 1940s, but the couple's famous molded arm and side chairs never were made in anything other than fiberglass or polypropylene because the curves of the seat couldn't be manufactured in wood. Now, 62 years after its initial release, the Eames Molded Side Chair has conquered that technological divide: The piece has just been reissued in walnut, white ash or santos polisander (a species of sustainably harvested Bolivian rosewood)
OPINION
September 11, 2005
Reading Timothy Garton Ash's "The thin veneer of civilization" (Opinion, Sept. 8), I found myself wondering what veneer he was talking about. Armed police officers patrol our streets every day precisely because we are not civilized, and our lack of civility permeates all levels of society. Capitalism's original bosses behaved (and many still do) more like wolves than civilized people, and our government's three branches exist solely to check one another's naked hunger for power. We are animals, and that fact stares us blankly in the face every day. THOMAS MATES Santa Barbara
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1997
Re "Jury Service With a Smile," Dec. 9. I was a juror the day the Van Nuys court added docents to the court system. This highly commendable veneer does not hide the serious basic flaws of the jury system. It will take more than docents to fix the jury system. PAUL L. KIRK Northridge
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 1985 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, Times Television Critic
There is a scene in "My Wicked, Wicked Ways . . . The Legend of Error Flynn" showing torrid French actress Lili Damita (Barbara Hershey) being chauffeured in her swanky auto. "Stop zee car!" she shouts. "Stop zee car!" And you are thinking: Stop zee movie! No chance. Airing at 8 tonight on CBS (Channels 2 and 8), "My Wicked, Wicked Ways" is a flat, cliched, silly three-hour celebration of the high-living film swashbuckler who died in 1959 at age 50.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003
For all of the coverage and discussion of the findings of polls related to the war, including Tim Rutten's column ("Hearts, Minds and Polls," March 29), I've yet to see much analysis of polling methodology. Although they have the veneer of scientific accuracy, typical polling almost cannot help but produce skewed results. Most polls are conducted by telephone. Screening mechanisms such as caller ID, answering machines and voicemail make it unlikely such calls get answered by a representative sample.
OPINION
January 31, 2009
Re "Get ready for March 3," editorial, Jan. 25 There's a reason people don't vote in the odd-year municipal elections. They feel disenfranchised! If one set out to destroy a city while maintaining a thin veneer of democratic process, one couldn't do a much better job than has been done in Los Angeles. The inconvenient and thinly covered off-year elections, gerrymandered City Council districts that divide rather than unite geographic units and population groups, unresponsive elected and appointed city officials, poorly enforced ethics and campaign contribution laws and backroom deals that allow rampant overdevelopment and complete disregard for land use and zoning regulations make many people say, "Why bother?"
NEWS
May 30, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Ray and Charles Eames started their experiments in molded plywood back in the 1940s, but the couple's famous molded arm and side chairs never were made in anything other than fiberglass or polypropylene because the curves of the seat couldn't be manufactured in wood. Now, 62 years after its initial release, the Eames Molded Side Chair has conquered that technological divide: The piece has just been reissued in walnut, white ash or santos polisander (a species of sustainably harvested Bolivian rosewood)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
A generation of Cuban artists (Kcho, Tania Bruguera, Los Carpinteros among them) came of age in the late 1980s and early '90s, their work taking up themes of national history, myth and ideology, the conditions of freedom, suppression and isolation, the prickly question of emigration. Thanks to a variety of cultural and political factors, the '90s were steeped in museum and gallery exhibitions of their work. Totalizing surveys are rarer these days, though the territory remains fertile, as evidenced by the ongoing program at Couturier Gallery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2012 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In the glittery new 3-D concert film "Katy Perry: Part of Me," the pop star asks with sweet conviction, "How could you ever be too cartoony?" On one level, the movie's answer is that you can't - and lots of rock star highs, Russell Brand lows and a whole lot of bubbly music fill up this frothy bit of show and tell. (It's delivered through special bubble-gum pink and cotton-candy blue 3-D glasses, to boot.) But directors Dan Cutforth and Jane Lipsitz have gotten past the cartoonish veneer to discover there is more to Perry than meets the eye. "Part of Me" does a solid job of filling in the good stuff, though if there is any dirt to be uncovered, you won't find it here.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By Laura Collins-Hughes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Girl by the Road at Night A Novel of Vietnam David Rabe Simon and Schuster: 230 pp., $23 It was a grant that determined the form David Rabe's writing on the Vietnam War would take after he was discharged from the Army in 1967. The money was for playwriting, and with it he began the quartet of plays that would make him famous: "The Basic Training of Pavlo Hummel," "Sticks and Bones," "The Orphan" and "Streamers. " "But oddly enough, it was a novel rather than a play that I wanted to work on," he wrote later.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2010
THEATER Stomp Tractor tire inner tubes and paint cans have been added to the troupe's arsenal of instruments. Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd. 8 p.m.; ends Feb. 7. Check website for dates. $25-$69. (323) 468-1770. www.broadwayla.org. BOOKS T.C. Boyle The author's prodigious output is matched by his freewheeling, exuberant writing style. He will discuss and sign his latest story collection, "Wild Child," and recent novel "The Women." 7 p.m.. Richard J. Riordan Central Library, 630 W. 5th St., L.A. Full; standby only.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2009 | David Sarno
Cash4Gold.com, the metal refinery that offers fast money to those who mail in baggies full of jewelry, has hit on a formula that would make 13th-century alchemists weep: It's found a way to turn desperation into gold. And in this economy, that's a growth business. The Florida company ponied up enough bullion Sunday to buy 30 seconds of famously expensive Super Bowl airtime, capping an ascent from the basement of late-night "as seen on TV" marketing.
OPINION
January 31, 2009
Re "Get ready for March 3," editorial, Jan. 25 There's a reason people don't vote in the odd-year municipal elections. They feel disenfranchised! If one set out to destroy a city while maintaining a thin veneer of democratic process, one couldn't do a much better job than has been done in Los Angeles. The inconvenient and thinly covered off-year elections, gerrymandered City Council districts that divide rather than unite geographic units and population groups, unresponsive elected and appointed city officials, poorly enforced ethics and campaign contribution laws and backroom deals that allow rampant overdevelopment and complete disregard for land use and zoning regulations make many people say, "Why bother?"
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2010
THEATER Stomp Tractor tire inner tubes and paint cans have been added to the troupe's arsenal of instruments. Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd. 8 p.m.; ends Feb. 7. Check website for dates. $25-$69. (323) 468-1770. www.broadwayla.org. BOOKS T.C. Boyle The author's prodigious output is matched by his freewheeling, exuberant writing style. He will discuss and sign his latest story collection, "Wild Child," and recent novel "The Women." 7 p.m.. Richard J. Riordan Central Library, 630 W. 5th St., L.A. Full; standby only.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012 | By Leah Ollman
A generation of Cuban artists (Kcho, Tania Bruguera, Los Carpinteros among them) came of age in the late 1980s and early '90s, their work taking up themes of national history, myth and ideology, the conditions of freedom, suppression and isolation, the prickly question of emigration. Thanks to a variety of cultural and political factors, the '90s were steeped in museum and gallery exhibitions of their work. Totalizing surveys are rarer these days, though the territory remains fertile, as evidenced by the ongoing program at Couturier Gallery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2007 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
California air regulators Thursday unanimously passed the world's toughest controls on toxic formaldehyde in wood products widely used in kitchen cabinets, countertops and other construction. Environmentalists, public health advocates, and manufacturers and distributors of formaldehyde-free wood cheered the news. Formaldehyde, widely used as a glue in wood veneer, plywood and other construction materials, has been shown to cause throat cancer, respiratory ailments and other problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2007 | Michael Ordona, Special to The Times
"West Side Story." "Bring It On." "Starsky & Hutch." Cinematic dance "battles" are hardly new, but audiences are likely to emerge from "Stomp the Yard" with battle fatigue. The film opens with the first of many such conflicts, in unabashed music-video style (director Sylvain White is a video vet), as headstrong DJ (Columbus Short, "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip") and his crew take on some sore losers in an underground L.A. club.
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