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NEWS
December 28, 1995 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cruising slowly in their ramshackle van, the disease detectives prowl the back streets of Los Angeles in search of a contagious hit-and-run artist. He lived in a makeshift camper. That's all Dave Sullivan and Vanessa Newton-Pulley have to go on. Their tipster, now cooling her heels in the L.A. County Jail on some unrelated charge, had bedded down with him shortly before testing positive for syphilis. One by one, she had rattled off the names of her lovers.
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NEWS
December 28, 1995 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cruising slowly in their ramshackle van, the disease detectives prowl the back streets of Los Angeles in search of a contagious hit-and-run artist. He lived in a makeshift camper. That's all Dave Sullivan and Vanessa Newton-Pulley have to go on. Their tipster, now cooling her heels in the L.A. County Jail on some unrelated charge, had bedded down with him shortly before testing positive for syphilis. One by one, she had rattled off the names of her lovers.
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NEWS
January 18, 1990 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Remember herpes? A decade ago, it was a hot topic, the subject of magazine cover stories, bad jokes, gossip, fear and confusion. What could be worse, thought many sexually active singles, than a sexually transmitted disease with no known cure? Then something far worse came along. AIDS, a fatal sexually transmitted disease with no known cure, bumped herpes from the headlines in the early '80s and has held them ever since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medical services at Los Angeles County's two principal jails have improved in the last three years, but some measures still should be taken, particularly those to identify prisoners with tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases, according to a doctor who inspected the facilities for the American Civil Liberties Union. Dr. Kim M. Thorburn, in charge of Hawaii's prison medical services, told the Sheriff's Department in a 12-page report that she was encouraged that many of her recommendations had been implemented from 1992 inspections of the Men's Central Jail and Sybil Brand women's jail.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers report that a virus implicated in cervical cancer causes the most common sexually transmitted disease among teen-age women. In a study of 1,400 women under age 19 in the San Francisco area, scientists found more of the teen-agers suffered from genital infections by the human papilloma virus, or HPV, than from chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. "That is an extraordinary finding, important for taking preventive and detection measures," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
An obscure venereal disease called chancroid, which has been largely unknown in the United States since 1956, appears to have re-established itself in Los Angeles County. The re-emergence of chancroid, which is characterized by genital warts, has raised new concern among health officials that it could facilitate the spread of the AIDS virus. The reappearance of the disease was confirmed by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medical services at Los Angeles County's two principal jails have improved in the last three years, but some measures still should be taken, particularly those to identify prisoners with tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases, according to a doctor who inspected the facilities for the American Civil Liberties Union. Dr. Kim M. Thorburn, in charge of Hawaii's prison medical services, told the Sheriff's Department in a 12-page report that she was encouraged that many of her recommendations had been implemented from 1992 inspections of the Men's Central Jail and Sybil Brand women's jail.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public health physician and the brothel-keeper were destined to hook up. Dr. Gary Richwald, a former UCLA professor who directs Los Angeles County's sexually transmitted disease program, had spent much of the last decade studying what he calls "sex industry workers." Russ Reade, a longtime Northern California high school biology and sex-education teacher, had left the classroom in search of riches 10 years ago, buying and managing one of Nevada's most famed houses of legal prostitution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Infant-care clinics and programs dealing with refugee health and follow-up care for venereal disease, threatened with cuts, have won a reprieve. County officials said Friday that they have found the money to run them after all. County administrative officers now say they have the $700,000 that these programs require. And they are asking the Board of Supervisors to cancel a special Sept. 17 hearing that would have led to them being cut. Budget director Ronald S.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young woman's face blushed the color of borscht. Her chin disappeared into the high collar of her fur coat as she looked furtively around the hospital waiting room making sure no one she knew was there. Then she whispered that she had caught "it" from her husband. The woman could not bring herself to speak the name of her ailment: syphilis. "Nobody cares how she got it; it's still considered a disgrace," said Valery V. Kuznetsov, chief doctor at the Skin and Venereal Disease Clinic No. 7.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young woman's face blushed the color of borscht. Her chin disappeared into the high collar of her fur coat as she looked furtively around the hospital waiting room making sure no one she knew was there. Then she whispered that she had caught "it" from her husband. The woman could not bring herself to speak the name of her ailment: syphilis. "Nobody cares how she got it; it's still considered a disgrace," said Valery V. Kuznetsov, chief doctor at the Skin and Venereal Disease Clinic No. 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Infant-care clinics and programs dealing with refugee health and follow-up care for venereal disease, threatened with cuts, have won a reprieve. County officials said Friday that they have found the money to run them after all. County administrative officers now say they have the $700,000 that these programs require. And they are asking the Board of Supervisors to cancel a special Sept. 17 hearing that would have led to them being cut. Budget director Ronald S.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public health physician and the brothel-keeper were destined to hook up. Dr. Gary Richwald, a former UCLA professor who directs Los Angeles County's sexually transmitted disease program, had spent much of the last decade studying what he calls "sex industry workers." Russ Reade, a longtime Northern California high school biology and sex-education teacher, had left the classroom in search of riches 10 years ago, buying and managing one of Nevada's most famed houses of legal prostitution.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | JAN HOFMANN, Jan Hofmann is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Remember herpes? A decade ago, it was a hot topic, the subject of magazine cover stories, bad jokes, gossip, fear and confusion. What could be worse, thought many sexually active singles, than a sexually transmitted disease with no known cure? Then something far worse came along. AIDS, a fatal sexually transmitted disease with no known cure, bumped herpes from the headlines in the early '80s and has held them ever since.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers report that a virus implicated in cervical cancer causes the most common sexually transmitted disease among teen-age women. In a study of 1,400 women under age 19 in the San Francisco area, scientists found more of the teen-agers suffered from genital infections by the human papilloma virus, or HPV, than from chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. "That is an extraordinary finding, important for taking preventive and detection measures," said Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
An obscure venereal disease called chancroid, which has been largely unknown in the United States since 1956, appears to have re-established itself in Los Angeles County. The re-emergence of chancroid, which is characterized by genital warts, has raised new concern among health officials that it could facilitate the spread of the AIDS virus. The reappearance of the disease was confirmed by the U.S.
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