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Venereal Disease

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NEWS
March 3, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first sex shop in Russian history opened to the public on Monday--only, please, its management insisted, don't call it a sex shop. "We call it 'an intimacy salon,' " director Alla Burashnikova said as she sat primly in a corner watching deeply interested Russians examine glow-in-the-dark condoms, an inflatable woman and six sets of shelves holding probably the broadest array of sexual devices ever gathered in one public place on Russian soil. "We propagandize health," Burashnikova said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medical services at Los Angeles County's two principal jails have improved in the last three years, but some measures still should be taken, particularly those to identify prisoners with tuberculosis and sexually transmitted diseases, according to a doctor who inspected the facilities for the American Civil Liberties Union. Dr. Kim M. Thorburn, in charge of Hawaii's prison medical services, told the Sheriff's Department in a 12-page report that she was encouraged that many of her recommendations had been implemented from 1992 inspections of the Men's Central Jail and Sybil Brand women's jail.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers report that a virus implicated in cervical cancer causes the most common sexually transmitted disease among teen-age women. In a study of 1,400 women under age 19 in the San Francisco area, scientists found more of the teen-agers suffered from genital infections by the human papilloma virus, or HPV, than from chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. "That is an extraordinary finding, important for taking preventive and detection measures," said Dr.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young woman's face blushed the color of borscht. Her chin disappeared into the high collar of her fur coat as she looked furtively around the hospital waiting room making sure no one she knew was there. Then she whispered that she had caught "it" from her husband. The woman could not bring herself to speak the name of her ailment: syphilis. "Nobody cares how she got it; it's still considered a disgrace," said Valery V. Kuznetsov, chief doctor at the Skin and Venereal Disease Clinic No. 7.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The young woman's face blushed the color of borscht. Her chin disappeared into the high collar of her fur coat as she looked furtively around the hospital waiting room making sure no one she knew was there. Then she whispered that she had caught "it" from her husband. The woman could not bring herself to speak the name of her ailment: syphilis. "Nobody cares how she got it; it's still considered a disgrace," said Valery V. Kuznetsov, chief doctor at the Skin and Venereal Disease Clinic No. 7.
NEWS
May 26, 1987
Health authorities said an outbreak of a rare venereal disease known as chancroid is sweeping Long Beach and contributing to a soaring venereal disease rate that has doubled in the past year. Dr.
SPORTS
November 18, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The teen-age beauty queen raped by Mike Tyson was infected with venereal disease in the attack that has left her physically and emotionally scarred, her attorney charged. Desiree Washington, 19, of Providence, R.I., is undergoing treatment for a sexually transmitted disease she contracted when she was raped by Tyson in July 1991 in Indianapolis, according to her attorney, Deval L. Patrick of Boston.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to overturn a milestone $150,000 damage award against a Sonoma County man for negligently infecting his girlfriend with a sexual disease. In a brief order, the justices rejected a challenge to a state Court of Appeal ruling last March holding that persons who knowingly fail to warn their sexual partners they had such a disease may be held liable, even if they believe they are not contagious.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
She was a coked-out 14-year-old who weighed 89 pounds when Patricia Thomas caught up with her. The girl's expensive drug habit had led her to random sex, which is where she got the recurring case of syphilis. She'd always fight the penicillin shots, sometimes needed weekly, saying she hated needles. Thomas, the public health investigator who tried to get the girl's venereal disease treated but eventually lost track of her, will always remember her face, although the name now escapes her.
NEWS
July 4, 1987
If the floor the Boston Celtics play on is as bad as everyone seems to think, why doesn't the NBA tell them to either lay a new floor or play all of their games away? In the playoffs, an announcer said a player picked up a loose screw and threw it off the floor. Some floor! GEORGE H. ADAMS Santa Barbara
SPORTS
November 18, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The teen-age beauty queen raped by Mike Tyson was infected with venereal disease in the attack that has left her physically and emotionally scarred, her attorney charged. Desiree Washington, 19, of Providence, R.I., is undergoing treatment for a sexually transmitted disease she contracted when she was raped by Tyson in July 1991 in Indianapolis, according to her attorney, Deval L. Patrick of Boston.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first sex shop in Russian history opened to the public on Monday--only, please, its management insisted, don't call it a sex shop. "We call it 'an intimacy salon,' " director Alla Burashnikova said as she sat primly in a corner watching deeply interested Russians examine glow-in-the-dark condoms, an inflatable woman and six sets of shelves holding probably the broadest array of sexual devices ever gathered in one public place on Russian soil. "We propagandize health," Burashnikova said.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Fox's "True Colors" Sunday, 18-year-old Terry Freeman (Claude Brooks) was ridiculed by his family for being a virgin. By the end of the show, his non-virgin girlfriend made it clear to him that he wouldn't be for much longer. On NBC's "Blossom" Monday, 15-year-old Blossom Russo (Mayim Bialik) debated "going to second base" with her boyfriend. On ABC's "Roseanne" Tuesday, 16-year-old Becky Connor, (Lecy Goramson) asked her mother to help her get birth control pills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1991 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Infant-care clinics and programs dealing with refugee health and follow-up care for venereal disease, threatened with cuts, have won a reprieve. County officials said Friday that they have found the money to run them after all. County administrative officers now say they have the $700,000 that these programs require. And they are asking the Board of Supervisors to cancel a special Sept. 17 hearing that would have led to them being cut. Budget director Ronald S.
NEWS
August 26, 1991 | BOB BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The public health physician and the brothel-keeper were destined to hook up. Dr. Gary Richwald, a former UCLA professor who directs Los Angeles County's sexually transmitted disease program, had spent much of the last decade studying what he calls "sex industry workers." Russ Reade, a longtime Northern California high school biology and sex-education teacher, had left the classroom in search of riches 10 years ago, buying and managing one of Nevada's most famed houses of legal prostitution.
NEWS
June 22, 1990 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Supreme Court on Thursday refused to overturn a milestone $150,000 damage award against a Sonoma County man for negligently infecting his girlfriend with a sexual disease. In a brief order, the justices rejected a challenge to a state Court of Appeal ruling last March holding that persons who knowingly fail to warn their sexual partners they had such a disease may be held liable, even if they believe they are not contagious.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On Fox's "True Colors" Sunday, 18-year-old Terry Freeman (Claude Brooks) was ridiculed by his family for being a virgin. By the end of the show, his non-virgin girlfriend made it clear to him that he wouldn't be for much longer. On NBC's "Blossom" Monday, 15-year-old Blossom Russo (Mayim Bialik) debated "going to second base" with her boyfriend. On ABC's "Roseanne" Tuesday, 16-year-old Becky Connor, (Lecy Goramson) asked her mother to help her get birth control pills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1987 | ALLAN PARACHINI, Times Staff Writer
An obscure venereal disease called chancroid, which has been largely unknown in the United States since 1956, appears to have re-established itself in Los Angeles County. The re-emergence of chancroid, which is characterized by genital warts, has raised new concern among health officials that it could facilitate the spread of the AIDS virus. The reappearance of the disease was confirmed by the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Researchers report that a virus implicated in cervical cancer causes the most common sexually transmitted disease among teen-age women. In a study of 1,400 women under age 19 in the San Francisco area, scientists found more of the teen-agers suffered from genital infections by the human papilloma virus, or HPV, than from chlamydia and gonorrhea combined. "That is an extraordinary finding, important for taking preventive and detection measures," said Dr.
NEWS
June 14, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
She was a coked-out 14-year-old who weighed 89 pounds when Patricia Thomas caught up with her. The girl's expensive drug habit had led her to random sex, which is where she got the recurring case of syphilis. She'd always fight the penicillin shots, sometimes needed weekly, saying she hated needles. Thomas, the public health investigator who tried to get the girl's venereal disease treated but eventually lost track of her, will always remember her face, although the name now escapes her.
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