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NEWS
November 30, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The second military revolt in less than a year against Venezuela's democratic government failed because of a lack of popular support, a communications breakdown and several misplaced assumptions by the coup's leaders, diplomats and military officials said Sunday. Unlike the first failed coup last Feb.
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WORLD
July 9, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
In his classic 1936 film, "Modern Times," Charlie Chaplin has to work so fast tightening bolts in a steel factory that he finally goes crazy. In a memorable scene that has become a metaphor for labor exploitation, the Little Tramp is run through the factory's enormous gears. For President Hugo Chavez's socialist government, the film is more than just entertainment: It's become a teaching tool.
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NEWS
August 20, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was probably too much to expect that the democratic and fiscal reforms sweeping Latin America for the past decade would suddenly clean up government corruption, a scourge that has plagued the region for centuries. Indeed, despite the new Latin American look, corruption remains as virulent as ever.
WORLD
September 16, 2005 | Paul Richter and Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writers
The Bush administration declared Thursday that Venezuela had failed to cooperate in the fight against drug trafficking, a move likely to worsen already strained relations between the countries.
NEWS
March 4, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
President Carlos Andres Perez on Friday characterized the bloody price riots that took more than 300 lives in this once tranquil and wealthy nation as a largely spontaneous and nonpolitical outburst of the poor against the rich. He blamed Venezuela's foreign-debt crisis for creating the conditions that sparked the violence.
NEWS
August 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
In a chaotic confrontation, Venezuelan lawmakers broke through crowds of protesters in Caracas and climbed over the fence of the capitol building, defying a constitutional assembly's order that virtually shut down Congress. Police and guardsmen fired tear gas and water cannons to control the melee between hundreds of supporters and opponents of President Hugo Chavez. About 30 people were injured.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A constitutional assembly controlled by supporters of President Hugo Chavez declared a legislative emergency in Venezuela, usurping most of Congress' functions. The move takes away the Venezuelan Congress' right to pass laws and limits its duties to a narrow range of activities such as budget oversight.
NEWS
December 4, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Venezuelans follow the lead of President Hugo Chavez in an upcoming referendum, their country will have a new constitution full of the grand ambition, ideological passion and nagging ambiguity that have characterized the year-old Chavez government. The debate leading up to the Dec. 15 vote on the new Magna Carta drawn up by a Chavez-dominated Constitutional Assembly inspires hope and fear.
NEWS
March 10, 1989
Venezuela restored some civil liberties, including the right to hold public protests, that were suspended Feb. 28 to quell nationwide price riots that claimed more than 250 lives. Soldiers will continue to patrol main avenues in Caracas, the capital, and in other cities until "the situation is totally normalized," government information director Pastor Heydra said. Restored liberties include press freedom, the right to gather in public and the right to travel inside and outside of Venezuela.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The future of Venezuela's democratic system remains in mortal danger, even though it survived two military coup attempts in less than a year, because the country's leaders may have learned the wrong lessons, diplomatic and key political sources say.
NEWS
March 18, 2001 | MARCELO BALLVE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Academia is still abuzz over a new book charging that a measles vaccine killed hundreds of primitive Amazon Indians three decades ago. But the Yanomami today have other problems, just as deadly. Chronic malaria and river blindness have decimated and debilitated the Yanomami, endangering the future of the world's largest remaining Stone Age tribe, Indian experts say.
NEWS
November 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The pro-government Congress on Tuesday granted President Hugo Chavez special fast-track powers to decree a wide range of laws without parliamentary debate, as the fractured opposition complained that the bill hands too much power to the president. The so-called enabling law allows Chavez one year to decree 37 laws on topics ranging from public finance to land reform. Chavez's leftist coalition controls 60% of Congress.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2000 | Reuters
Venezuela's National Assembly voted unanimously to open an investigation into whether products made by Ford Motor Co. and tire maker Bridgestone Corp. were responsible for 46 road deaths in the South American nation. The assembly will appoint a commission to probe charges that inadequate suspension on Ford's Explorer sport-utility vehicle combined with weak Wilderness AT tires made by Bridgestone's Firestone unit to cause more than 70 high-speed accidents.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Less than one week after a new Congress opened, President Hugo Chavez said Thursday that he may seek special powers that would allow him to sidestep the legislature on key issues. Chavez asserted at a news conference that Congress may be too bogged down with regulatory issues to attend to pressing problems such as unemployment, land reform and the tax system. He said he might ask the legislature to grant him a fast-track enabling law that would allow him to unilaterally push through his agenda.
NEWS
January 24, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
President Hugo Chavez named lawyer Isaias Rodriguez, who was second in command of the pro-government Constitutional Assembly, as Venezuela's vice president. The announcement in Caracas filled what Chavez described as a key post. Rodriguez, 57, will be in charge of the day-to-day running of the government and also coordinate the executive branch's ties with Parliament. The post was created by a constitution approved in a referendum last month.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | From Associated Press
Venezuelans overwhelmingly approved on Wednesday a constitution that eliminates the Senate and vastly increases the power of President Hugo Chavez, allowing him to stay in office for up to 13 years, according to early results. With more than 80% of the ballots counted, 71% of voters were in favor of the new charter and 29% opposed. Street celebrations immediately broke out when the initial results were announced by the National Electoral Council.
NEWS
March 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
government suspended constitutional rights Tuesday and imposed a nationwide curfew as riots over price increases ravaged Venezuela for a second day and looting spread. President Carlos Andres Perez appealed on television for an end to the "incredible tragedy," which, according to police estimates, has killed up to 50 people and injured 500. Even as Perez spoke, gunfire was heard in the streets, and rioting and looting continued in the worst violence in 30 years of democratic rule.
NEWS
February 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
On the fifth anniversary of major riots against price hikes, the government put together a new economic plan that aims to defuse social unrest. President Rafael Caldera suspended a portion of the constitution, which allows free commerce, thus possibly setting the stage for reimposing price controls. Caldera also suspended an unpopular value-added tax at the retail level. That means only importers and wholesalers have to pay the full 10%.
NEWS
December 4, 1999 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If Venezuelans follow the lead of President Hugo Chavez in an upcoming referendum, their country will have a new constitution full of the grand ambition, ideological passion and nagging ambiguity that have characterized the year-old Chavez government. The debate leading up to the Dec. 15 vote on the new Magna Carta drawn up by a Chavez-dominated Constitutional Assembly inspires hope and fear.
NEWS
November 20, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
President Hugo Chavez says a new constitution drafted by an assembly packed with his allies would distance the world's No. 3 oil exporter from "savage capitalism." Chavez, a left-leaning nationalist, has alarmed investors at home and abroad with frequent attacks on the free-market economic model. The Venezuelan charter will be put to a referendum Dec. 15. Business groups and opposition politicians say it will discourage foreign investors.
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