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Venezuela Government Aid

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February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
The president of Venezuela wants state banks to grant interest-free loans to poor people looking to start small businesses. "We want to give incentives. . . . Those who pay back on time will get a discount, and those who cancel before expiring will get a bigger discount," President Hugo Chavez said Thursday during an economic forum. "This is necessary to pull people out of misery, poverty." Chavez said the idea was inspired by similar initiatives in Arab countries.
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BUSINESS
February 23, 2001 | From Associated Press
The president of Venezuela wants state banks to grant interest-free loans to poor people looking to start small businesses. "We want to give incentives. . . . Those who pay back on time will get a discount, and those who cancel before expiring will get a bigger discount," President Hugo Chavez said Thursday during an economic forum. "This is necessary to pull people out of misery, poverty." Chavez said the idea was inspired by similar initiatives in Arab countries.
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BUSINESS
August 29, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cheap wine in Argentina and tortillas and tuition in Mexico, free land in Brazil, discounted gasoline in Venezuela, subsidized electricity everywhere: Such lavish government programs are gradually being dismantled across Latin America. But it should come as no surprise that it's politically unpopular to do so. Nor is it a coincidence that tiny Ecuador, a place where subsidies to consumers continue to hold sway, was in the news last week as the continent's latest economic disaster area.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1999 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cheap wine in Argentina and tortillas and tuition in Mexico, free land in Brazil, discounted gasoline in Venezuela, subsidized electricity everywhere: Such lavish government programs are gradually being dismantled across Latin America. But it should come as no surprise that it's politically unpopular to do so. Nor is it a coincidence that tiny Ecuador, a place where subsidies to consumers continue to hold sway, was in the news last week as the continent's latest economic disaster area.
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