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Vengeance

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011
V is for Vengeance Sue Grafton A Marion Wood book/G.P. Putnam's Sons: 437 pp., $27.95
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NATIONAL
December 17, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Every shopper's worst nightmare played out in an upscale New Jersey mall over the weekend, turning the joyful Christmas season to ashes for the family of a pair of young lawyers who will gather Wednesday for a funeral.  Carjackers approached Dustin Friedland and his wife, Jamie, in the parking area at the Mall at Short Hills and opened fire. Dustin was gravely wounded and left to die by his assailants, who drove off in his late-model silver Range Rover which was recovered nearby in Newark - a scant 15 minutes away by vehicle but more than a lifetime away in wealth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2009 | Greg Braxton
Since breaking out in the mid-'90s with the hip-hop-flavored "Friday" and the young-women-robbing-banks urban thriller "Set It Off," F. Gary Gray has established himself among the handful of former music video directors who graduated to helming big-budget projects. But after a steady career that included the back-to-back crunch of directing 2003's "The Italian Job" and 2005's "Be Cool" -- two films with more than their share of physical and creative demands -- Gray seemed to vanish, prompting some to wonder about his professional future.
NATIONAL
August 7, 2013 | By Michael Muskal
Summer's here, bringing climbing temperatures, rising humidity in some areas and the renewed threat from killer bees. So far this season a colony of 100,000 Africanized honeybees have taken up residence in a Houston home and a similar sized swarm attacked two park workers in Florida. At least one death has been reported in Central Texas as well as attacks on humans and animals elsewhere. “It's nearly impossible to put a number on the deaths,” Kim Kaplan, speaking for the Agricultural Research Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Sue Grafton, author of the alphabetically themed mystery series starring the snappy female detective Kinsey Millhone and a town very much like 1980s Santa Barbara, has long been adamant that her books and her character would never make it to the Hollywood screen. She even told her children that she would haunt them like a malevolent ghost if they were to sell the rights after her death. It certainly hasn't kept her heroine from the kind of fame that is usually only achieved by being the main character in a blockbuster film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Robert Abele
South Korean provocateur Kim Ki-duk's new film "Pieta," about a cold, wraith-like loan-shark enforcer in a poverty-stricken village, is expectedly gruesome in some of its details. But it's the explicitness about capitalism's emotional wreckage that gives this micro-budgeted drama a gut-punch heft. Kang-do (Lee Jung-jin, working a thousand-yard stare) slaps, breaks, tortures and cripples the desperate small-time machinists of cramped, industrial Cheonggyecheon who owe his boss money.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It has the makings of a trash-film lover's idea of heaven. In this corner, the filmmaking team of Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor, credited as Neveldine/Taylor, purveyors of willful, gleefully disreputable movies like "Crank" and "Crank 2: High Voltage. " They are smart enough to know better and self-consciously shameless enough to go there anyway. And in this corner is Nicolas Cage, who has over time transformed into a performer of such ridiculous earnestness that it is impossible to unravel whether he gets it or not. Cage is the opposite of irony.
OPINION
January 20, 2002
Re "A Son Has Been Waiting 26 Years for Justice," Jan. 17: Columnist Steve Lopez and Jon Opsahl have it wrong. It is not the function of the justice system to provide therapy or vengeance to Jon Opsahl or even to focus on his slain mother, Myrna Opsahl. That is the function of the civil courts. The job of the criminal justice system is to keep our society safe. I defy anyone to tell me how our society is any safer if Sara Jane Olson, Bill Harris, Emily Harris (Montague) or Michael Bortin are put in prison for the rest of their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Ministry of Vengeance" (citywide) tries to freshen up the macho revenge formula with, of all things, spirituality, but the result is tedious and cynical. "Dukes of Hazzard's" John Schneider stars as a minister and Vietnam veteran haunted by wartime nightmares that caused him to turn to religion in the first place. Then his faith is shattered when his wife and daughter are murdered by an Arab terrorist in Rome's airport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1985
None of us has any doubts that driving while under the influence of alcohol is a shamefully irresponsible act; causing the death of an innocent human being multiplies that act tenfold. But reading the account (May 30) of Evan Haller's sentencing hearing in a Van Nuys court was deeply disturbing, particularly Judge Albracht's remarks delivered from the bench that "an offense like this cries out for the vengeance." Forgive me if I am wrong, but I was under the impression that sentencing under our judicial system was not for the sake of avenging a criminal act but instead to impose punishment to fit the crime and, hopefully, rehabilitation.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2013 | By Robert Abele
South Korean provocateur Kim Ki-duk's new film "Pieta," about a cold, wraith-like loan-shark enforcer in a poverty-stricken village, is expectedly gruesome in some of its details. But it's the explicitness about capitalism's emotional wreckage that gives this micro-budgeted drama a gut-punch heft. Kang-do (Lee Jung-jin, working a thousand-yard stare) slaps, breaks, tortures and cripples the desperate small-time machinists of cramped, industrial Cheonggyecheon who owe his boss money.
OPINION
April 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Prosecutors have rebuffed an offer by James E. Holmes, the accused killer of 12 people in a movie theater rampage in Aurora, Colo., last year, to plead guilty in exchange for a sentence of life in prison. In deciding instead to seek the death penalty, the district attorney is ignoring significant indications that Holmes was deranged when he allegedly committed his crimes. Equally troubling, the D.A. said he reached his decision after speaking to families of victims. This editorial page opposes capital punishment in all circumstances.
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Laura King
REPORTING FROM KABUL, AFGHANISTAN -- Prayers and muffled sobs filled the air Monday during remembrances by Afghan villagers for 16 of their neighbors, nine of them children, who were killed a day earlier during a shooting rampage allegedly carried out by an American soldier. In the capital, Kabul, parliament passed a resolution condemning the "brutal and inhuman" act by the accused assailant, identified by the U.S. military as a sergeant who acted alone in his attack on civilians near his base in Kandahar province.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It has the makings of a trash-film lover's idea of heaven. In this corner, the filmmaking team of Mark Neveldine and Brian Taylor, credited as Neveldine/Taylor, purveyors of willful, gleefully disreputable movies like "Crank" and "Crank 2: High Voltage. " They are smart enough to know better and self-consciously shameless enough to go there anyway. And in this corner is Nicolas Cage, who has over time transformed into a performer of such ridiculous earnestness that it is impossible to unravel whether he gets it or not. Cage is the opposite of irony.
BUSINESS
February 17, 2012 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
Nicolas Cage plays with fire in "Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance," but it's the competition at the box office that is likely to get burned this weekend. The 3-D sequel, featuring Cage as a demonic motorcycle-riding superhero, is expected to be the No. 1 film over Presidents Day weekend. According to those who have seen pre-release audience surveys, the movie will debut with around $30 million in sales from Friday through Monday. The tear-jerker "The Vow" and the action film "Safe House," which each opened to more than $40 million last weekend, probably will fight for the runner-up position with around $20 million in sales.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
It's 10 a.m. in Sydney, Australia, and Liam McIntyre has just posed one of the most serious questions facing actors like him who often have to bare their beefcake physique clad in nothing but a shred of a loin cloth. "What happened to six-minute abs?" the Aussie inquired by phone. "No, really, I want to know. " This from a man who finds himself in three-hour gym sessions four times a week to convincingly portray the brawny, lead role in the Starz series "Spartacus: Vengeance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1993
Dershowitz has injected a note of sanity in the pathetic lionization of Nesler. Those who make her into a hero need to check their emotions and consider the implications of her act. The film "Unforgiven" painted a grim portrait of a society without a meaningful justice system, where vengeance was accepted, and only the strongman could maintain order by dispensing arbitrary and cruel punishment. Is this the type of society that the vengeance seekers want? The justice system that we have is far from perfect, but it can be improved, whereas the law of vengeance will lead us only to a barbarism unimaginably worse than what we have today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1992
It is a travesty of justice when a person can kill something as beautiful as a pelican and only receive a sentence of one year probation and 10 days of community service ("Pelican Mutilations Return With a Vengeance," Sept. 20). What makes these animals' lives any less sacred than our own? VICKI KUNKEL, Huntington Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011
V is for Vengeance Sue Grafton A Marion Wood book/G.P. Putnam's Sons: 437 pp., $27.95
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | By Jessica Garrison, Los Angeles Times
Sue Grafton, author of the alphabetically themed mystery series starring the snappy female detective Kinsey Millhone and a town very much like 1980s Santa Barbara, has long been adamant that her books and her character would never make it to the Hollywood screen. She even told her children that she would haunt them like a malevolent ghost if they were to sell the rights after her death. It certainly hasn't kept her heroine from the kind of fame that is usually only achieved by being the main character in a blockbuster film.
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