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Venice Arts Mecca

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NEWS
March 16, 1995
Your article on Venice Arts Mecca ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26.) did a good job of showing why all of us should be supporting this wonderful community organization. I applaud founder Bingwa and President Lynn Warshefsky and their dedicated volunteers for their devotion to the youth of Venice. Who better than Venice Arts Mecca to turn the neglected Pavilion into a vital community center! DEBRA MILLER Venice
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1997
A nonprofit Venice arts group working to transform the long-vacant Venice Pavilion into a community arts facility for low-income children has an extra six months to raise the $1.5 million it needs to refurbish the building. Last week, the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks commissioners granted the Venice Arts Mecca a six-month extension to finish fund-raising because the group raised only $425,000 in the last 18 months.
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NEWS
March 19, 1995
I was pleased to see that you had the foresight to provide cover story attention to the Venice Arts Mecca project ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26). The Venice Arts Mecca's popularity and support grows exponentially in the Venice community as people become aware of the potential offered by rehabilitating the Venice Pavilion. My 4-year-old son has discovered a whole new world in his Saturday afternoon paint class sponsored by the Venice Arts Mecca. The studio is provided by a talented Venice painter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1997
A nonprofit Venice arts group working to transform the long-vacant Venice Pavilion into a community arts facility for low-income children has an extra six months to raise the $1.5 million it needs to refurbish the building. On Wednesday, the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks commissioners granted the Venice Arts Mecca a six-month extension to finish fund-raising because the group raised only $425,000 in the last 18 months.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
Venice Arts Mecca, a nonprofit community arts group for children, is holding its fourth art exhibit and festival Saturday at Venice United Methodist Church. Proceeds from the festival, scheduled from noon to 6 p.m., will go to Venice Arts Mecca activities, which include classes in orchestral music, black and white photography, ceramics, theater, painting and filmmaking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A nonprofit children's arts program, the pride of some Venice artists and art enthusiasts since the Los Angeles riots, has become a source of bitterness and division in the neighborhood's arts community. A power struggle between the founder of the Venice Arts Mecca and the organization's board of directors has both sides fighting over who can best serve the children--particularly those who live in Venice's impoverished Oakwood neighborhood.
NEWS
December 8, 1994
The Venice Arts Mecca, a nonprofit community arts group that offers free workshops to low-income Venice youths, plans to exhibit participants' work on Saturday. The show, "Venice Through Our Eyes," will feature the work of artists ages 6 to 22 who, under the guidance of local artists, have produced paintings, drawings, collage, black-and-white photographs and ceramic pieces. The exhibit will include a buffet and music by local jazz vocalist Dante Chambers, among others. It will be from 6 to 9 p.
OPINION
May 5, 1996
Re "Arts Group Split by Bitter Feud," April 2: Under the leadership of Artistic Director Ira McAlilely, a Venice resident formerly with Colors United, and currently an artist-in-residence with the L.A. Opera's opera in the schools program, the Venice Arts Mecca is offering eight free arts workshops to Venice youth. These include a photography collaboration between kids in Venice, Watts and Pasadena, the Venice Youth Pops Orchestra & Jazz Ensemble and an architecture workshop involving youth in the design of the Venice Pavilion.
NEWS
March 9, 1995
I wish to commend the Los Angeles Times Westside Section for the positive coverage of the efforts of Venice/Oakwood residents and workers to re-create a safe and productive neighborhood ("Making A Difference," March 2). So much attention is given to what does not work, what is wrong, that it is a pleasure to hear about what is good. Your coverage of Broadway Elementary School, of the Venice Arts Mecca and most recently Brad Carson, and all the uplifting work happening in a community that has been much maligned, gives us all hope for the future.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
Te'amir Sweeney is a talkative, gregarious boy who lives in Oakwood, a Venice neighborhood where mothers are said to put their babies to bed in bathtubs to protect them from drive-by bullets. I don't know if Te'amir, 7 1/2 and a passionate gymnast, spends much time thinking about street violence and gang intrigue, but he needs to be protected from it. And, like all the children in this violence-plagued city, he needs a safe haven to play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996
The people at the Venice Arts Mecca know what they hope the future holds for the abandoned Venice Beach Pavilion. If the organization can raise enough money to renovate and restore the concrete structure, the building on the boardwalk will become a community arts center. To showcase what could be, the 3-year-old organization is holding a festival this weekend to celebrate work created by students enrolled in its eight free workshops.
OPINION
May 5, 1996
Re "Arts Group Split by Bitter Feud," April 2: Under the leadership of Artistic Director Ira McAlilely, a Venice resident formerly with Colors United, and currently an artist-in-residence with the L.A. Opera's opera in the schools program, the Venice Arts Mecca is offering eight free arts workshops to Venice youth. These include a photography collaboration between kids in Venice, Watts and Pasadena, the Venice Youth Pops Orchestra & Jazz Ensemble and an architecture workshop involving youth in the design of the Venice Pavilion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A nonprofit children's arts program, the pride of some Venice artists and art enthusiasts since the Los Angeles riots, has become a source of bitterness and division in the neighborhood's arts community. A power struggle between the founder of the Venice Arts Mecca and the organization's board of directors has both sides fighting over who can best serve the children--particularly those who live in Venice's impoverished Oakwood neighborhood.
NEWS
May 4, 1995 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER
Venice Arts Mecca, a nonprofit community arts group for children, is holding its fourth art exhibit and festival Saturday at Venice United Methodist Church. Proceeds from the festival, scheduled from noon to 6 p.m., will go to Venice Arts Mecca activities, which include classes in orchestral music, black and white photography, ceramics, theater, painting and filmmaking.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Thanks for your Feb. 26 piece on the extraordinary community impact of Venice Arts Mecca--a very bright point of light in our neighborhood. What conceivable reason would the City Council and the commissioners of Recreation and Parks have for not turning over the abandoned Venice Pavilion to provide space for this extremely successful local organization. Your account suggests that this group of dedicated volunteers, drawing on the rich variety of artists and musicians living in Venice, would fill the Beach Park with music, dance and art. As well, given a centralized location, the Arts Mecca would attract substantial support from corporate donors, provide a cultural center for children and young adults, create a much needed low-cost child care facility, generate opportunities for job training, and even provide jobs for young Venice residents.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
I was pleased to see that you had the foresight to provide cover story attention to the Venice Arts Mecca project ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26). The Venice Arts Mecca's popularity and support grows exponentially in the Venice community as people become aware of the potential offered by rehabilitating the Venice Pavilion. My 4-year-old son has discovered a whole new world in his Saturday afternoon paint class sponsored by the Venice Arts Mecca. The studio is provided by a talented Venice painter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996
The people at the Venice Arts Mecca know what they hope the future holds for the abandoned Venice Beach Pavilion. If the organization can raise enough money to renovate and restore the concrete structure, the building on the boardwalk will become a community arts center. To showcase what could be, the 3-year-old organization is holding a festival this weekend to celebrate work created by students enrolled in its eight free workshops.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Thanks for your Feb. 26 piece on the extraordinary community impact of Venice Arts Mecca--a very bright point of light in our neighborhood. What conceivable reason would the City Council and the commissioners of Recreation and Parks have for not turning over the abandoned Venice Pavilion to provide space for this extremely successful local organization. Your account suggests that this group of dedicated volunteers, drawing on the rich variety of artists and musicians living in Venice, would fill the Beach Park with music, dance and art. As well, given a centralized location, the Arts Mecca would attract substantial support from corporate donors, provide a cultural center for children and young adults, create a much needed low-cost child care facility, generate opportunities for job training, and even provide jobs for young Venice residents.
NEWS
March 16, 1995
Your article on Venice Arts Mecca ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26.) did a good job of showing why all of us should be supporting this wonderful community organization. I applaud founder Bingwa and President Lynn Warshefsky and their dedicated volunteers for their devotion to the youth of Venice. Who better than Venice Arts Mecca to turn the neglected Pavilion into a vital community center! DEBRA MILLER Venice
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