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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A nonprofit children's arts program, the pride of some Venice artists and art enthusiasts since the Los Angeles riots, has become a source of bitterness and division in the neighborhood's arts community. A power struggle between the founder of the Venice Arts Mecca and the organization's board of directors has both sides fighting over who can best serve the children--particularly those who live in Venice's impoverished Oakwood neighborhood.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was no pardon for the crumbling Venice Pavilion on Tuesday as state environmental officials approved plans to demolish the hulking community center, which is Venice Beach's most visible and controversial landmark. Heeding the call of residents and officials who described the pavilion as a financial sinkhole and a haven for rats and transients, the California Coastal Commission voted 8 to 1 to replace the building with a park and beach space.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997
The graffiti pit--accidentally whitewashed in January by the city--will soon be back in glorious color. Plans for a paint-in will be discussed Monday night at a Social and Public Arts Resource Center meeting at 6:30 p.m. at 685 Venice Blvd. "We're asking artists to provide sketches of their proposed work, and will be designating portions of the wall to them," said Sydney Kamlager, director of the city-funded agency. "This is about restoring graffiti art, not tagging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They bolted the rusty doors shut 15 years ago and ever since, critics say, the Venice Pavilion has been a crumbling eyesore, a rat-infested monument to public neglect and unfulfilled intentions. Now, though, after much haggling over the future of the quirky complex, city officials are poised to demolish the pavilion as part of a $15-million plan to spruce up Venice Beach for the Democratic National Convention in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1993 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fifty years of fighting and false starts were so much water under the footbridge Tuesday as a boatload of city officials formally opened the rebuilt Venice Canals, gently joking about the glacial pace of the $6-million project. As a neighborhood leader punted her sailboat-turned-gondola in a wobbly course down Eastern Canal, Los Angeles Councilwoman Ruth Galanter shrugged off an onlooker's request for an accompanying song--say, something Italian. "This is the canals," Galanter said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997
A segment of a new mural at the Venice Graffiti Pit that depicts a pig in a police officer's uniform was hidden from public view Thursday, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department said. The Recreation and Parks Commission decided Wednesday to cover up the controversial depiction, which forms part of the "City of Angels"-themed mural near the Venice Pavilion, said department spokesman Lee Nichols.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They bolted the rusty doors shut 15 years ago and ever since, critics say, the Venice Pavilion has been a crumbling eyesore, a rat-infested monument to public neglect and unfulfilled intentions. Now, though, after much haggling over the future of the quirky complex, city officials are poised to demolish the pavilion as part of a $15-million plan to spruce up Venice Beach for the Democratic National Convention in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The urban archeologists got an early start Sunday morning. Clad in walking shoes and armed with steaming cups of coffee, they gathered on the Venice boardwalk before 9 under a salty mist that drifted over from the gray ocean. Their mission: to troll the streets of Venice, excavating below the funky veneer for a glimpse of its glamorous past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997
A historic Venice mural that sparked controversy when it was unveiled in 1975 has been restored by the original artists. The Jaya Mural, named after a women's artist collective that helped paint it, will be rededicated Saturday. As the only mural in the Venice Canals area, the 30-foot-long artwork painted on the back of a South Venice Boulevard building celebrates the close-knit, diverse community that thrived in the neighborhood 20 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997 | MATEA GOLD and JOHN M. GLIONNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps only in Venice Beach--home to off-the-wall artists, boardwalk bassoon players and alternative-minded denizens--could an act of graffiti cleanup be investigated as a case of vandalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The urban archeologists got an early start Sunday morning. Clad in walking shoes and armed with steaming cups of coffee, they gathered on the Venice boardwalk before 9 under a salty mist that drifted over from the gray ocean. Their mission: to troll the streets of Venice, excavating below the funky veneer for a glimpse of its glamorous past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1997
A segment of a new mural at the Venice Graffiti Pit that depicts a pig in a police officer's uniform was hidden from public view Thursday, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department said. The Recreation and Parks Commission decided Wednesday to cover up the controversial depiction, which forms part of the "City of Angels"-themed mural near the Venice Pavilion, said department spokesman Lee Nichols.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997
The graffiti pit by the Venice pavilion is back again in sparkling color. Seventeen teams of six artists each have repainted the walls, which had been accidentally whitewashed by a city crew in January. The result "looks awesome," said Sydney Kamlager, public art director for the Social and Public Art Resource Center, a city-funded agency that provided the paint and materials. Nor was the restoration, which occurred Saturday, your ordinary graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997
The graffiti pit--accidentally whitewashed in January by the city--will soon be back in glorious color. Plans for a paint-in will be discussed Monday night at a Social and Public Arts Resource Center meeting at 6:30 p.m. at 685 Venice Blvd. "We're asking artists to provide sketches of their proposed work, and will be designating portions of the wall to them," said Sydney Kamlager, director of the city-funded agency. "This is about restoring graffiti art, not tagging.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997
A historic Venice mural that sparked controversy when it was unveiled in 1975 has been restored by the original artists. The Jaya Mural, named after a women's artist collective that helped paint it, will be rededicated Saturday. As the only mural in the Venice Canals area, the 30-foot-long artwork painted on the back of a South Venice Boulevard building celebrates the close-knit, diverse community that thrived in the neighborhood 20 years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mystery of the whitewashed Venice Beach Graffiti Pit has been solved. The culprits--a group of painters in unmarked vans who covered the popular tourist attraction with a coat of beige--were workers cleaning graffiti as part of their sentences for committing misdemeanors. Project Heavy West, a nonprofit Westside community agency that coordinates graffiti removal, was contracted by the city to remove graffiti from the Venice Beach Pavilion, next to a sunken amphitheater called the Pit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1997
The graffiti pit by the Venice pavilion is back again in sparkling color. Seventeen teams of six artists each have repainted the walls, which had been accidentally whitewashed by a city crew in January. The result "looks awesome," said Sydney Kamlager, public art director for the Social and Public Art Resource Center, a city-funded agency that provided the paint and materials. Nor was the restoration, which occurred Saturday, your ordinary graffiti.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mystery of the whitewashed Venice Beach Graffiti Pit has been solved. The culprits--a group of painters in unmarked vans who covered the popular tourist attraction with a coat of beige--were workers cleaning graffiti as part of their sentences for committing misdemeanors. Project Heavy West, a nonprofit Westside community agency that coordinates graffiti removal, was contracted by the city to remove graffiti from the Venice Beach Pavilion, next to a sunken amphitheater called the Pit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1997 | MATEA GOLD and JOHN M. GLIONNA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Perhaps only in Venice Beach--home to off-the-wall artists, boardwalk bassoon players and alternative-minded denizens--could an act of graffiti cleanup be investigated as a case of vandalism.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A nonprofit children's arts program, the pride of some Venice artists and art enthusiasts since the Los Angeles riots, has become a source of bitterness and division in the neighborhood's arts community. A power struggle between the founder of the Venice Arts Mecca and the organization's board of directors has both sides fighting over who can best serve the children--particularly those who live in Venice's impoverished Oakwood neighborhood.
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