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Venice Community Housing Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Construction is scheduled to begin today on an affordable-housing project in Venice. The 25-unit complex, developed by the nonprofit Venice Community Housing Corp., will provide low-income families with apartments with as many as four bedrooms. The three-story project will take one year to complete and will be built on city-owned land in the 300 block of 4th Avenue, said Steve Clare, executive director of the housing corporation. Rents will range from $276 to $730 a month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desperate to fix a plumbing problem without busting their meager budget, Dorothy Castille and her husband spotted a young man in a painter's jumpsuit working near their home in Venice's Oakwood neighborhood. "I thought he might know somebody who could do the work," Castille recalled of that day about three years ago, "and what a blessing that turned out to be!" The young man was an apprentice in the nonprofit Venice Community Housing Corp.'
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1997
A coalition of nonprofit social service agencies will share a vacant former public library in Venice, city officials said Monday. The agencies joined to create Venice Works when city officials called for proposals for the building on California Avenue, located in the heart of Venice's poorest neighborhood. The group, awarded a $127,500 grant from United Way, will offer services ranging from job placement to mentoring. The structure will be renamed the Oakwood Family Youth Center.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | JAMES RICCI
when steve clare drives around venice, his mind's eye plays tricks on him. Along the canals where new mansions loom ostentatiously over the water, he sees ghosts of wooden working-class bungalows connected by dirt paths. On North Beach he sees shades of departed Holocaust survivors spending the last years of unimaginably darkened lives in the sun by the sea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
Not every young criminal wants to make crime a career. People change. Some drug dealing gang members contemplate going straight as the turning point age of 30 beckons. Maybe they're afraid of risking a third strike and life sentence with another crime. Maybe they'd like to give up the dangerous street life and become family men or women. We don't know how many are so inclined. Years of social science research has provided no firm answers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desperate to fix a plumbing problem without busting their meager budget, Dorothy Castille and her husband spotted a young man in a painter's jumpsuit working near their home in Venice's Oakwood neighborhood. "I thought he might know somebody who could do the work," Castille recalled of that day about three years ago, "and what a blessing that turned out to be!" The young man was an apprentice in the nonprofit Venice Community Housing Corp.'
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | ADRIAN MAHER
Despite opposition from some residents, housing advocates are welcoming a series of favorable rulings by Los Angeles zoning administrators regarding construction of a 25-unit apartment building for low-income families in Oakwood. The proposed development at 325 4th Ave., which will include one- to four-bedroom units with a maximum monthly rent of $569, would include a community garden, a barbecue area with picnic tables, a recreation room and a basketball and recycling area.
MAGAZINE
August 12, 2001 | JAMES RICCI
when steve clare drives around venice, his mind's eye plays tricks on him. Along the canals where new mansions loom ostentatiously over the water, he sees ghosts of wooden working-class bungalows connected by dirt paths. On North Beach he sees shades of departed Holocaust survivors spending the last years of unimaginably darkened lives in the sun by the sea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2009 | Martha Groves
The Venice Community Housing Corp. has bought a $3.6-million apartment building that will be used to provide affordable housing for people who are now homeless. The city of Los Angeles contributed $750,000 toward the purchase. The agency also got a loan from the Corporation for Supportive Housing, a national nonprofit that helps communities create permanent housing with services. St. Joseph Center will provide supportive services for the residents. Of the 20 units, 19 will be made available as affordable housing for homeless individuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1996
Twenty-five low-income families have settled into the recently opened Tabor Courts in Venice, a 25-unit housing project named after a member of a prominent local African American family. City officials joined the families last week in celebrating completion of the $3.5-million project, a sleek apartment building on 4th Avenue that boasts a tiled mosaic entrance and a ceramic mural.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1997 | BILL BOYARSKY
Not every young criminal wants to make crime a career. People change. Some drug dealing gang members contemplate going straight as the turning point age of 30 beckons. Maybe they're afraid of risking a third strike and life sentence with another crime. Maybe they'd like to give up the dangerous street life and become family men or women. We don't know how many are so inclined. Years of social science research has provided no firm answers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1997
A coalition of nonprofit social service agencies will share a vacant former public library in Venice, city officials said Monday. The agencies joined to create Venice Works when city officials called for proposals for the building on California Avenue, located in the heart of Venice's poorest neighborhood. The group, awarded a $127,500 grant from United Way, will offer services ranging from job placement to mentoring. The structure will be renamed the Oakwood Family Youth Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1995
Construction is scheduled to begin today on an affordable-housing project in Venice. The 25-unit complex, developed by the nonprofit Venice Community Housing Corp., will provide low-income families with apartments with as many as four bedrooms. The three-story project will take one year to complete and will be built on city-owned land in the 300 block of 4th Avenue, said Steve Clare, executive director of the housing corporation. Rents will range from $276 to $730 a month.
NEWS
December 8, 1994 | ADRIAN MAHER
Despite opposition from some residents, housing advocates are welcoming a series of favorable rulings by Los Angeles zoning administrators regarding construction of a 25-unit apartment building for low-income families in Oakwood. The proposed development at 325 4th Ave., which will include one- to four-bedroom units with a maximum monthly rent of $569, would include a community garden, a barbecue area with picnic tables, a recreation room and a basketball and recycling area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998
At what was once a blighted collection of boarded-up apartment buildings, officials and residents of a new affordable-housing complex gathered to celebrate the project's completion. The nonprofit Venice Community Housing Corp. built 23 housing units at Washington Place and Frances Avenue, said Steve Clare, the organization's executive director, after razing five of six dilapidated buildings on the site.
NEWS
May 12, 1994 | KEN ELLINGWOOD
Heidi Frey normally hunts for big donations to help the Venice Community Housing Corp. buy property for affordable housing. Now, she and her husband, Robert Greenwald, have made one. The couple's $50,000 contribution last Friday is about half of the cash the nonprofit corporation will need to buy and renovate a four-unit Oakwood building for low-income renters.
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