Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVenice Family Clinic
IN THE NEWS

Venice Family Clinic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 18, 1990 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. today at Hillside Memorial Park for Dr. Phillip L. Rossman, the much beloved and honored internist who gave birth to the Venice Family Clinic 20 years ago. Rossman was 76 when he died Monday at St. John's Hospital and Medical Center, where he had been on the staff for many years. In 1970 he and Dr.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Cheryl Terry coughed sharply as she stepped into the homeless shelter's crude medical clinic: a cinder block room with folding tables and plastic tubs of medicine. Her doctor was pressed for time. He had just two hours to see more than a dozen patients at the crowded Culver City facility on this rainy December night. "Cheryl, I'm Greg. What's going on?" Dr. Greg Yesensky asked. "My chest ? coughing ? it's bright, yucky yellow," she said. A quick exam revealed bronchitis.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Irma Colen, 84, who for more than 20 years led fundraising efforts for the Venice Family Clinic, a free healthcare center for the poor and uninsured, died Sunday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica of complications from heart surgery. One of her best-known fundraisers was the Venice Art Walk, which she and a group of other volunteers launched in 1981. The event, including tours of artists' studios and an art auction, has raised millions of dollars for the Venice clinic.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 2010
Downtown Los Angeles Art Walk Held: Monthly Next one: Thursday, Noon-10 p.m. Info: http://www.downtownartwalk.com Artwalk Culver City Held: Annually Next One: Early June (subject to change) Info: http://www.culvercity.org Miracle Mile Art Walk Held: Quarterly Next one: Saturday, 2-10 p.m. Info: http://www.miraclemileartwalk.com The Brewery Artwalk Held: Spring and fall Next one: Spring 2011 Info: http://www.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1992 | G. JEANETTE AVENT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A private piano lesson with Dudley Moore, a walk-on part in television's Murphy Brown and a billboard message in Los Angeles for two weeks are among the hot properties to be auctioned off this weekend during the annual Venice Art Walk. The silent auction and a tour of the homes and studios of more than 50 artists are among the events planned from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday as a fund-raiser for the Venice Family Clinic.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2011 | By Duke Helfand, Los Angeles Times
Cheryl Terry coughed sharply as she stepped into the homeless shelter's crude medical clinic: a cinder block room with folding tables and plastic tubs of medicine. Her doctor was pressed for time. He had just two hours to see more than a dozen patients at the crowded Culver City facility on this rainy December night. "Cheryl, I'm Greg. What's going on?" Dr. Greg Yesensky asked. "My chest ? coughing ? it's bright, yucky yellow," she said. A quick exam revealed bronchitis.
REAL ESTATE
February 12, 1989
Construction is under way on a $2.1-million expansion of the Venice Family clinic, 604 Rose Ave., Venice. Fern Seizer, executive director, said that while the architect Widom Wein Cohen of Los Angeles donated 80% of its fees, the free medical clinic is still seeking donations of construction materials.
NEWS
January 5, 1990
Candidate Zelman--A Dec. 28 article on Walter Zelman, candidate for state insurance commissioner, incorrectly identified the Venice Family Clinic. Also, Zelman said that when he asked to hold an "event" at the facility, he was suggesting a press conference or other publicity event, and not a fund-raiser as the story reported.
NEWS
January 24, 1985
The Atlantic Richfield Foundation has given a $15,000 grant to the Venice Family Clinic, a nonprofit organization providing free or reduced-cost medical care to low-income families on the Westside. The money will be put toward the purchase of a new building at 604 Rose Ave. In 1984, the clinic handled 12,000 patient visits.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By Charlie Amter, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Venice may be the home of more internationally known artists than perhaps any other area of Southern California over the last few decades, but recently, all the action for casual art appreciators has shifted to Culver City and downtown L.A., where a monthly "art walk" has livened up the loft-heavy city core. Now, the beach is fighting back. A scrappy grassroots neighborhood effort to emulate the success of art-centric block parties and happenings in other Southland neighborhoods has given rise to a new Westside event, the monthly Venice Art Crawl.
OPINION
February 2, 2008
Re "State health plan killed," Jan. 29 Each day, thousands of Californians wake up sick or in pain and are not able to simply call their doctor. Many wait months to see specialists and then many more months for simple surgeries that would enable them to return to work and support their families. If they are lucky enough to eventually get the care they need, it may mean bankruptcy or years of financial instability as they attempt to pay off their hospital bills. The California Senate Health Committee essentially agreed to keep this "system" in place when it voted down the healthcare reform bill created by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez (D-Los Angeles)
OPINION
February 25, 2007
Re "Law would bar dumping patients on the street," Feb. 22 Making "patient dumping" unlawful is not the answer. Hospitals will then let the homeless still in need of medical care just walk out, forgoing the free ride to skid row. But the answer is not complex at all: There are more than 90,000 homeless people in Los Angeles County every night, yet there is only one recuperative care (post-hospitalization) facility for the homeless consisting of 45 beds, run by the JWCH Institute clinic on skid row. Thus, provide more recuperative-care facilities.
OPINION
November 21, 2006
Re "L.A. files patient 'dumping' charges," Nov. 16 I'm not at all surprised by the patient "dumping" stories. This has been going on for years. Nonpublic hospitals regularly release patients who lack health insurance before they are ready, or don't admit them to the hospital when they should. As a staff physician at a free clinic, I frequently see patients who were either released from the hospital too early or not admitted when they should have been. What we should be looking at is not that these patients get a free ride to the shelter, but that they weren't cared for appropriately in the first place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Irma Colen, 84, who for more than 20 years led fundraising efforts for the Venice Family Clinic, a free healthcare center for the poor and uninsured, died Sunday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica of complications from heart surgery. One of her best-known fundraisers was the Venice Art Walk, which she and a group of other volunteers launched in 1981. The event, including tours of artists' studios and an art auction, has raised millions of dollars for the Venice clinic.
NEWS
February 19, 2006 | Candice Choi, Associated Press Writer
After Rick Sawyer had a heart attack last year, he found himself staring down a huge stack of hospital bills. For the first time in his life, Sawyer, 60, of Scotia, N.Y., had no health insurance. He soon became one of the growing cross-section of racial and economic demographics turning to free clinics for medical care. The National Assn. of Free Clinics estimates there are about 2,000 such clinics today generating about $3 billion in healthcare services annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1998
People suffering from diabetes and hypertension will benefit because of a grant to the Venice Family Clinic from a drug company's charitable foundation, officials said. A $47,000 grant from the New York-based Pfizer Foundation will fund improvements to the health center's pharmacist-directed chronic care clinic, in which patients with diabetes and hypertension have regular visits with pharmacists who monitor their medications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2004 | Steve Lopez, Steve Lopez writes Sunday, Wednesday and Friday. Reach him at steve.lopez@latimes.com
Years ago I lived near the beach in a neighborhood that had a lot going for it. The people-watching at Rose Cafe. The hot bread fresh out of the oven at Pioneer Bakery. The handmade tortillas at La Cabana, which I could walk to at 2 in the morning if I got the urge. During all this imbibing, I never noticed the Venice Family Clinic at 6th and Rose. When I was offered a tour of the place recently, I had to ask where it was. Sometimes the best stories are right under your nose.
OPINION
October 23, 2004
Your "no" position on Proposition 67 is disappointing (editorials, Oct. 9 and Oct. 17). California's emergency rooms are in dire straits. Proposition 67 would raise $550 million to keep emergency rooms open. Fact: Los Angeles County has lost six emergency rooms this year. Fact: Statewide, over 65 emergency rooms have shut in the last decade, and more close each month. Emergency rooms are the great equalizers. Rich or poor, employed or not, insurance or no insurance, when that ambulance pulls into the hospital, you want to know that the doors will be open and qualified physicians and nurses will be there to treat you. Proposition 67 would do that.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|