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Venice High School

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 2006 | From Times Staff Reports
Five wanted felons were arrested during a sweep by prosecutors, police and probation officers in the neighborhood around Venice High School, prosecutors announced Wednesday. The sweep, conducted as part of City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo's Strategy Against Violent Environments Near Schools, also resulted in the placement of four children in protective custody. Four of the felons arrested were wanted on warrants involving narcotics violations; one was a sex offender.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 2013 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
A triumphal march blared and the crowd roared Saturday afternoon as hundreds of competitors filed into the massive gymnasium at the Roybal Learning Center. The high school students were pumped - some teams danced a little to get warmed up, and at least one team had their school mascot there to root them on - and they were prepared, having spent months training for this moment. Some of the students carried themselves with the intensity of gladiators stepping into the ring. The challenge before them was a purely intellectual one, but it was still daunting: The last leg of Los Angeles Unified's regional Academic Decathlon was about to begin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1996
Venice High School's extracurricular budget will be boosted by about 40% for the coming school year, thanks to $12,000 raised by the school's alumni association. The funds were presented to the school Saturday and will go to purchase choir robes, musical instruments, athletic uniforms and props for stage productions. The donation capped a four-month fund-raising drive by the alumni association, which received assistance from the school's booster club and Parent Teacher Student Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2012 | By Matt Stevens and Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Two men were in custody Monday in connection with the killing of a popular Venice youth pastor, Los Angeles police said. Kevin Dwayne Green, 28, and Hopeton Bereford Parsley, 22, were named as suspects in the slaying of Oscar Duncan, according to LAPD Officer Wendy Reyes andLos Angeles County Sheriff's Department inmate records. Green was arrested Friday, according to the records, was booked the next day and is being held without bail. Parsley was arrested and booked Saturday and is being held on $1-million bail, according to the records.
NEWS
March 9, 1995 | CAROL CHASTANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Venice High School has joined LEARN, the ambitious school reform program that gives schools greater control over their budgets and curriculum. Venice joins 88 other Los Angeles Unified schools participating in LEARN (Los Angeles Educational Alliance for Restructuring Now), which was developed two years ago by a coalition of business, civic and education leaders. The program seeks to increase student achievement by giving greater autonomy to local schools. Other Westside schools hope to follow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1994
For the second consecutive year, a team from Venice High School has taken first place in the regional competition of the National Science Bowl. Venice High last weekend beat 19 high school teams--15 from the Los Angeles Unified School District. The five-member team from Venice will travel to Washington on April 22 to challenge 50 regional finalists in the national competition. A team from University High School in Los Angeles came in second, and Van Nuys High School placed third.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1993
A 19-year-old Venice High School student was shot Wednesday as he waited for a bus near campus shortly after classes let out for the day, Los Angeles police said. The 3:20 p.m. shooting took place about two hours after a group fight at the school, and authorities were trying to determine whether the incidents were related. The unidentified victim, who was shot from a passing car, was in stable condition at UCLA Medical Center, according to the Los Angeles Police Department's Pacific station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Kenneth Curry was first out, stumped by combustible. The 10th-grader was one of nine students competing last week in a vocabulary bee at Venice High School. Held in the cafeteria, the war of words had the structure of an old-fashioned spelling bee. Each student was asked to define one of a list of words, many of which had been part of the school's word-of-the-day program. Students who failed were eliminated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1989 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, Times Staff Writer
Sculptor William Van Orden's most memorable work may never be finished. For years, he has tried to save Venice High School's statue of actress Myrna Loy from unending assault by vandals--a job some have compared to tilting at windmills. During the last decade the sculptor has restored the statue 12 times, scraping away old paint, replacing heads and arms that were battered and once even destroyed by dynamite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1997 | AMY PYLE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lunchtime at the Venice High School cafeteria is a lesson in speed: in 15 minutes flat, nearly 600 students have raced through the food lines, cleared the cashier hurdle and thrown down their lunch, most of them not even taking the time to sit while they eat. Although the haste to refuel may not be news to anyone familiar with modern high school students, what is piled on their Styrofoam trays these days is a surprise even to the teenagers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2010 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The ceremonial gowns for Animo Venice Charter High School's graduation will be navy blue, but the philosophy behind them is all green. The campus is among a number of high schools and colleges around California and the nation that are adopting environmentally friendly graduation garb made from either renewable wood fibers or recycled plastic bottles. The eco-robes being worn at Animo Venice, for example, are designed to decompose quickly if graduates decide to discard them. "If it ends up in the trash, at least we know we won't hurt the environment," said Animo Venice salutatorian Monica Bautista, 18. That's why her class decided to pay $10 more for the wood-fiber "Elements" gowns from Minnesota-based Jostens Inc. instead of going with the firm's more traditional polyester graduation robes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2010 | By Tony Barboza
Venice High School welcomed back some Old Hollywood royalty Saturday as hundreds gathered for the unveiling of a new statue of alumna and movie star Myrna Loy. The bronze work is a re-creation of the beloved concrete sculpture of Loy that graced the front lawn of Venice High for more than seven decades but suffered years of corrosion and vandalism. Students and alumni crowded around the veiled statue at noon Saturday as a contingent of the marching band and cheerleaders kicked off the celebration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | Martha Groves
Screen legend Robert Redford has next to nothing in common with bait shop owner John "Yosh" Volaski. But it's possible they brushed past each other decades ago as they whiled away youthful hours at a place that beguiled them both: the Santa Monica Pier. On Sept. 9, 1909, crowds swarmed for the first time onto the 1,600-foot-long structure to enjoy band concerts and swimming and boating races, as a flotilla of naval vessels floated offshore. On Wednesday, the pier turns 100, a milestone that will be marked with ceremonies, performances and the first major fireworks show in Santa Monica Bay in more than 18 years.
OPINION
November 19, 2008
Re "Do the math," editorial, Nov. 16 I am a junior at Venice High School in the L.A. Unified School District. There is a serious problem within the school -- and even more so, in the district. The LAUSD has delayed paying for books for the music department. It is inconceivable for students to further their music education without books! This also puts an enormous amount of stress on the district's underpaid teachers, who must come up with new assignments constantly. The problem is not whether the district has the money, it is: Are they willing to use it correctly?
OPINION
November 26, 2007
Re "An adoptee uncovers the risks of knowing," Column One, Nov. 22 Thank you for printing Scott Glover's story about searching for his biological parents, and ultimately about the life-altering choice he made as a result of his journey. Tales such as this could be part of what saves print media: Instead of spinning or preaching to us from on high by the droner du jour, we have been given an unadorned first-person recounting of a very real life.
OPINION
November 26, 2007
Re "Freedom should prevail over fear and fences," column, Nov. 17 I am in my 10th year of teaching at Venice High School, and I am vehemently against putting a fence up around our school. I agree with Sandy Banks about the aesthetic and feel of our open campus, but the bigger issue is one that the news has ignored. In both cases, the shootings happened a couple of minutes before dismissal and inside a parking area.
OPINION
July 7, 2003 | Naldy Estrada and Julio Robles
As reporters for our student newspaper, it was only natural that we would do a story about Jacqueline Domac, a 39-year-old health teacher at Venice High School who had led a controversial crusade to ban junk food on campus. But when we began our research, we never imagined what we would learn about Domac or that our story for the paper would be unceremoniously killed, our reporting would come under attack and our rights as student journalists would be trampled on.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2007 | Sandy Banks
Venice High School dodged a bullet last week -- literally and figuratively. Ten days ago, an on-campus shooting sent students scrambling, but the bullets didn't hit anybody. The only injury was to a boy who fell and hurt his wrist as he tried to get out of the line of fire. The suspects, who drove onto the campus through an unlocked gate, sped off. The next day, school officials tried to get back to normal.
OPINION
April 27, 2007
Re "Arizona -- it's the new Nevada," April 24 My husband and I left Los Angeles and moved to Madison, Wis., 11 years ago to find a very nice home in a good neighborhood on our combined income of about $70,000. We bought a 4,700-square-foot, four-bedroom home for $220,000, which is now appraised at $386,000. We could never have afforded such a home if we had remained in Los Angeles. In the beginning, I wondered what a Venice High School and UCLA graduate was doing in Madison, but in time I found the city to be a very good fit for two committed liberals.
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