Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVenice Italy
IN THE NEWS

Venice Italy

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 3, 1996 | Marla Dickerson, Marla Dickerson covers tourism for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5670 and at marla.dickerson@latimes.com
The world knows the Walt Disney Co. best for its films, theme parks and merchandise, but next month in Venice, Italy, the company's buildings will take center stage. Disney architecture will be the focus of the United States' entry in the sixth Venice Architecture Biennale, where nations gather every two years to show off pictures and models of their finest bricks and mortar.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 16, 2011
If Interstate 5 were a canal, it might resemble the Grand Canal in Venice, one of the Italian city's busiest waterways. Times reader "jimpix" captured this scene from the Rialto Bridge at sundown. The S-shaped waterway starts at St. Mark's Basilica and winds toward Santa Chiara Church. It stretches about two miles, and its average depth is about 17 feet. Here's a satellite view of the canal: View Larger Map Interested in feedback from Los Angeles Times photographers?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1996 | MARTIN WOLK, REUTERS
Nobody can accuse glass artist Dale Chihuly of thinking small. Since he discovered the art of glass-blowing as a student in the 1960s, Chihuly has helped propel the medium to the forefront of the modern art world with enormous, undulating, platter-like creations and whimsical glass sculptures assembled by 10-person teams.
FOOD
August 5, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
As stone fruits come into the peak of their season, I'm obsessing over Bellinis. For the uninitiated, that would be the Venetian aperitivo of Prosecco with white peach juice. The original was invented by Giuseppe Cipriani at Harry's Bar in Venice (not the one south of Santa Monica but the original watery city) sometime before the second world war, but it wasn't named "the Bellini" until 1948. Harry's was — and still is — famous as a watering hole for the rich and celebrated.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1988 | Associated Press
Sotheby's auctioneers racked up nearly $500,000 in sales Sunday at their first auction in China, and organizers said the profits would go to renovate half a mile of the Great Wall. "It's super," said Julian Thompson, auctioneer and chairman of Sotheby's International, after 73 Chinese and Western works of modern art and rare objects brought in a total of 1.76 million yuan, or about $475,850.
NEWS
June 13, 1987 | Associated Press
The mayor of Venice said Friday the lagoon city should never host another Western economic summit. Mayor Nereo Laroni spoke at a news conference two days after the leaders of the seven major industrialized nations ended their three-day meeting. Laroni criticized the "imposing and cumbersome security" that he said was "incompatible with the extremely delicate fabric" of Venice. He complained of hundreds of speeding motorboats, lack of mobility for the citizens and the constant din of helicopters.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrendering to an angry opposition that ranged from international environmentalists and art lovers to hometown politicians and gondoliers, the Italian government Tuesday formally withdrew Venice's candidacy as site of a world's fair in the year 2000.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | From Reuters
Police stormed the bell tower in St. Mark's Square on Friday and arrested eight separatists who occupied it in an armed protest that put concern about secession back on Italy's political agenda. A team of 24 masked paramilitary police commandos ended the protest about five hours after the group of young men, some dressed in combat fatigues, broke into one of Venice's best-known landmarks.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER and DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writers
The Italian government has mobilized 7,000 police and other agents to protect the seven leaders of the industrial world in their annual economic summit beginning today, but there are fewer security problems in the magnificent Renaissance city of Venice than in most other grand sites in the world. Venice is built on a cluster of islands and canals in a lagoon off the Adriatic Sea. Only one bridge connects the mainland of Italy to the largest island of Venice.
NEWS
April 6, 1988 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Sandwiched like interlopers among the exclaiming crowds of day trippers on Venice's water buses each morning are about 25,000 Venetians returning as commuters to jobs in a city they have fled. Every week, two or three more Venetian families swap champagne for seltzer, abandoning splendid, waterlogged Venice the Serene for easier life on the nearby mainland.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Felix Gonzalez-Torres, who died of AIDS-related complications at 38 in 1996, is the second American to be posthumously represented in the high-profile American pavilion at the Venice Biennale. Unfortunately, the show mostly represents a lost opportunity for any of scores of living American artists. When Robert Smithson was so honored in 1982, nine years after his untimely death at 35, the privilege was crucial to securing his international reputation.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2003 | Daniel Williams, Washington Post
The facade of Venice's luxuriant opera house, La Fenice, is again gleaming white. Inside, bare-breasted plaster nymphs once more show themselves off against a ceiling of gold leaf and a painted azure sky. The acoustics seem as rich as ever -- no microphones needed, thank you. Sunday night, nearly eight years after arsonists burned it to the ground, one of Italy's most storied theaters came back to life.
NEWS
December 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
After more than 12 years of debate and discord, Italy approved a plan to save Venice from sinking by installing mobile barriers to protect the city from high tides. The project, approved at a Cabinet meeting, will take about eight years and $2.6 billion to complete. The barriers would be erected on the Adriatic seabed near the entrance to the Venetian lagoon. They would be raised only when high tides threaten the city.
NEWS
May 27, 2001 | FRANCES D'EMILIO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The first of five blasts from the sirens atop St. Mark's bell tower and other high points in this lagoon city sounded late one night in early April, unusually late for the high tide season. The alarm woke many Venetians and tired tourists and let night owls know they would have wet feet if they didn't make it home in a couple of hours before the acqua alta--high water--flooded in. In Venice, life and the sea are inseparable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1999 | DAVID GRITTEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The future of the International Film Festival here has been surrounded by fervent speculation, just as there is about this exquisite city itself, perched upon insecure foundations in its intricate system of canals. Venice has recently been eclipsed as an end-of-summer festival by Toronto, which is bigger, better organized and within easier reach of Hollywood. But in its 56th year, Venice has emerged leaner and meaner: Just 80 films were screened, half its 1997 total.
TRAVEL
December 20, 1998 | BARRY VAN WAGNER, Van Wagner is a writer and photographer based in Pinole, Calif
I last visited the canal-crossed city of Venice during a busy August 12 years ago, and my indelible memory is of tourists and mosquitoes swarming the city in equal numbers. Overrun by a glut of pedestrians, it seemed that Venice, which is sinking by 2 centimeters a year, would go down long before its time under the crush of trampling feet. These visions kept me from returning to the city for over a decade as I searched for quieter places to enjoy.
NEWS
June 6, 1990 | From Reuters
Italy said Tuesday it will not withdraw its controversial bid for Venice to host Expo 2000, but he added that much of the world's fair will be held outside the historic center. Prime Minister Giulio Andreotti told Parliament that, if the Paris-based International Exhibition Bureau chose Venice, the fair would be centered on the mainland cities of Marghera and Mestre and other parts of the Veneto region.
NEWS
June 8, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
The skies are blue and sunlit and the streets are swept by warm, gentle breezes as the leaders of the industrialized world sit down for their annual summit conference in one of the world's great Renaissance cities. But, if the literary admirers of Venice are correct, the magnificent weather and site could get in the way. "In truth," American novelist Henry James wrote more than 100 years ago, "Venice isn't in fair weather a place for concentration of mind."
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | From Reuters
Police stormed the bell tower in St. Mark's Square on Friday and arrested eight separatists who occupied it in an armed protest that put concern about secession back on Italy's political agenda. A team of 24 masked paramilitary police commandos ended the protest about five hours after the group of young men, some dressed in combat fatigues, broke into one of Venice's best-known landmarks.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1996 | Marla Dickerson, Marla Dickerson covers tourism for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-5670 and at marla.dickerson@latimes.com
The world knows the Walt Disney Co. best for its films, theme parks and merchandise, but next month in Venice, Italy, the company's buildings will take center stage. Disney architecture will be the focus of the United States' entry in the sixth Venice Architecture Biennale, where nations gather every two years to show off pictures and models of their finest bricks and mortar.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|