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Venice Pavilion

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The best theater in Venice, say many locals, is on the boardwalk, where a vast parade of humanity unfolds on any sunny weekend. Still, from 1961, when the Venice Pavilion opened, to 1985, when it was shut by the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Department, it was the other theater at the beach. It also offered the kind of colorful variety that the boardwalk is famous for. In its early days as an amphitheater, the pavilion held such unlikely events as flower shows.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2003 | Christopher Miles, Special to The Times
If there's a common quality among the finest national pavilions at the Venice Biennale, it is simplicity. A perfect example is Canada's lone offering: a witty, elegant tribute to the 400th anniversary of Champlain's New France explorations. Spanning six screens, Jana Sterbak's video work, titled "From Here to There," is a sweet epic chronicling contemporary explorations along the banks of the St.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was no pardon for the crumbling Venice Pavilion on Tuesday as state environmental officials approved plans to demolish the hulking community center, which is Venice Beach's most visible and controversial landmark. Heeding the call of residents and officials who described the pavilion as a financial sinkhole and a haven for rats and transients, the California Coastal Commission voted 8 to 1 to replace the building with a park and beach space.
OPINION
May 7, 2000 | Tom Moran, Tom Moran, a longtime Venice resident and the author of "Fantasy by the Sea," a history of Venice, teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology
A bone-numbing chill always stalked the Venice Pavilion. With the Pacific only a few steps away across the sand, the auditorium interior was wet and sepulchral. The concrete slabs that served as seats were hard and uncomfortable, the brick walls frigid and uninviting and the acoustics abysmal. These were just some of the very good reasons that the public facility, which was demolished last week, languished for years. Still, the building had its moments.
OPINION
January 9, 2000
Before the Venice Pavilion is finally demolished (Jan. 2), I hope one of its unique qualities will be considered. I have practiced my cornet in the so-called "graffiti pit" more or less daily since 1978. It's about a mile-and-a-half walk from my house. I go to this trouble because the place has the best acoustics of any small outdoor arena I've ever been in. It was intended to be used as an alfresco concert hall. When I play in there, there is a wonderful reflection of the sound off the walls, better than any stage monitor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1987
A processing center for homeless people has been opened in Venice. Located at the Venice Pavilion, the center is staffed by city and county employees and is open to anyone interested in finding employment or applying for general relief. Rick Ruiz, an aide to Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter, said the center will remain open for at least two weeks. After that period, homeless people still camped on Venice Beach will be ordered to leave, he said. Ruiz said Galanter is negotiating for the right to place a 30-bed homeless shelter on property owned by the Public Storage Co. at Rose Avenue and 3rd Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1987
Los Angeles City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter challenged Venice residents and businesses Thursday to find housing and jobs for the community's homeless people, while also urging hundreds of vagrants camped on the beach to remove their makeshift shelters and seek help from the city and county.
NEWS
September 3, 1987
The Venice Pavilion will not be used as a shelter for the homeless. City Councilwoman Ruth Galanter this week rejected the idea of using the beachfront building as a place to house more than 150 vagrants, saying that the pavilion would have to undergo substantial and costly renovation. A special Venice task force on the homeless had suggested that the pavilion be used to house the area's growing homeless population in a report issued last month.
OPINION
May 5, 1996
Re "Arts Group Split by Bitter Feud," April 2: Under the leadership of Artistic Director Ira McAlilely, a Venice resident formerly with Colors United, and currently an artist-in-residence with the L.A. Opera's opera in the schools program, the Venice Arts Mecca is offering eight free arts workshops to Venice youth. These include a photography collaboration between kids in Venice, Watts and Pasadena, the Venice Youth Pops Orchestra & Jazz Ensemble and an architecture workshop involving youth in the design of the Venice Pavilion.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
I was pleased to see that you had the foresight to provide cover story attention to the Venice Arts Mecca project ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26). The Venice Arts Mecca's popularity and support grows exponentially in the Venice community as people become aware of the potential offered by rehabilitating the Venice Pavilion. My 4-year-old son has discovered a whole new world in his Saturday afternoon paint class sponsored by the Venice Arts Mecca. The studio is provided by a talented Venice painter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There was no pardon for the crumbling Venice Pavilion on Tuesday as state environmental officials approved plans to demolish the hulking community center, which is Venice Beach's most visible and controversial landmark. Heeding the call of residents and officials who described the pavilion as a financial sinkhole and a haven for rats and transients, the California Coastal Commission voted 8 to 1 to replace the building with a park and beach space.
OPINION
January 9, 2000
Before the Venice Pavilion is finally demolished (Jan. 2), I hope one of its unique qualities will be considered. I have practiced my cornet in the so-called "graffiti pit" more or less daily since 1978. It's about a mile-and-a-half walk from my house. I go to this trouble because the place has the best acoustics of any small outdoor arena I've ever been in. It was intended to be used as an alfresco concert hall. When I play in there, there is a wonderful reflection of the sound off the walls, better than any stage monitor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They bolted the rusty doors shut 15 years ago and ever since, critics say, the Venice Pavilion has been a crumbling eyesore, a rat-infested monument to public neglect and unfulfilled intentions. Now, though, after much haggling over the future of the quirky complex, city officials are poised to demolish the pavilion as part of a $15-million plan to spruce up Venice Beach for the Democratic National Convention in August.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1998
A final public meeting to discuss the future reuse of the Venice Pavilion will be held tonight, city officials said. Suggestions for the use of the long-closed pavilion at the foot of Windward Avenue range from tearing down the structure to establishing a museum at the site, said project manager Kathleen Chan of the Recreation and Parks Department. The pavilion, built in 1959 as a theater, was closed in the 1980s for safety reasons and remains vacant.
OPINION
May 5, 1996
Re "Arts Group Split by Bitter Feud," April 2: Under the leadership of Artistic Director Ira McAlilely, a Venice resident formerly with Colors United, and currently an artist-in-residence with the L.A. Opera's opera in the schools program, the Venice Arts Mecca is offering eight free arts workshops to Venice youth. These include a photography collaboration between kids in Venice, Watts and Pasadena, the Venice Youth Pops Orchestra & Jazz Ensemble and an architecture workshop involving youth in the design of the Venice Pavilion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | MARY MOORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A nonprofit children's arts program, the pride of some Venice artists and art enthusiasts since the Los Angeles riots, has become a source of bitterness and division in the neighborhood's arts community. A power struggle between the founder of the Venice Arts Mecca and the organization's board of directors has both sides fighting over who can best serve the children--particularly those who live in Venice's impoverished Oakwood neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1987
Ever wonder why we humans are so drawn to the beach that, each weekend, one-half million of us are willing to cope with L.A. traffic to get there? Despite the parking problems, sand fleas, broken bottles, honky-tonk and bikini bazaar, the beach provides man with something essential to his well-being. While far from tranquil, the beach somehow manages to restore the human spirit. It seeps into one--past the screaming babies and boom-boxes, it seeps in. At the beach, man is in an environment beyond his control.
OPINION
May 7, 2000 | Tom Moran, Tom Moran, a longtime Venice resident and the author of "Fantasy by the Sea," a history of Venice, teaches at the Rochester Institute of Technology
A bone-numbing chill always stalked the Venice Pavilion. With the Pacific only a few steps away across the sand, the auditorium interior was wet and sepulchral. The concrete slabs that served as seats were hard and uncomfortable, the brick walls frigid and uninviting and the acoustics abysmal. These were just some of the very good reasons that the public facility, which was demolished last week, languished for years. Still, the building had its moments.
NEWS
April 6, 1995
Thanks for your Feb. 26 piece on the extraordinary community impact of Venice Arts Mecca--a very bright point of light in our neighborhood. What conceivable reason would the City Council and the commissioners of Recreation and Parks have for not turning over the abandoned Venice Pavilion to provide space for this extremely successful local organization. Your account suggests that this group of dedicated volunteers, drawing on the rich variety of artists and musicians living in Venice, would fill the Beach Park with music, dance and art. As well, given a centralized location, the Arts Mecca would attract substantial support from corporate donors, provide a cultural center for children and young adults, create a much needed low-cost child care facility, generate opportunities for job training, and even provide jobs for young Venice residents.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
I was pleased to see that you had the foresight to provide cover story attention to the Venice Arts Mecca project ("Creative Touch," Feb. 26). The Venice Arts Mecca's popularity and support grows exponentially in the Venice community as people become aware of the potential offered by rehabilitating the Venice Pavilion. My 4-year-old son has discovered a whole new world in his Saturday afternoon paint class sponsored by the Venice Arts Mecca. The studio is provided by a talented Venice painter.
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