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Venice West Cafe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2010 | By Martha Groves
From 1958 to 1966, the Venice West Cafe served as a gathering place for disciples of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and the other pioneers of the Beat Generation who planted the seeds of L.A.'s counterculture movement. Ray Manzarek, keyboardist for the Doors, recalls the spot as a hangout for post-beatnik intellectuals in dark turtlenecks and jeans, where he and bandmate Jim Morrison, under the influence of LSD, drank espresso and ate croissants while reading Camus and Sartre. Although the style of the building on Dudley Avenue near Ocean Front Walk is listed as "commercial vernacular" and nobody seems to know who designed it, the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission is expected to decide today whether to recommend that the site be designated as a city historic-cultural monument.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2010 | By Martha Groves
From 1958 to 1966, the Venice West Cafe served as a gathering place for disciples of Jack Kerouac, Allen Ginsberg and the other pioneers of the Beat Generation who planted the seeds of L.A.'s counterculture movement. Ray Manzarek, keyboardist for the Doors, recalls the spot as a hangout for post-beatnik intellectuals in dark turtlenecks and jeans, where he and bandmate Jim Morrison, under the influence of LSD, drank espresso and ate croissants while reading Camus and Sartre. Although the style of the building on Dudley Avenue near Ocean Front Walk is listed as "commercial vernacular" and nobody seems to know who designed it, the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission is expected to decide today whether to recommend that the site be designated as a city historic-cultural monument.
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NEWS
January 9, 2010
PGA Tour preview: An article looking at the upcoming professional golf tour in Thursday's Sports section said that AT&T, Accenture and Tag Heuer had dumped sponsorship deals with Tiger Woods in the wake of controversy. Tag Heuer still has its relationship with Woods but has scaled back his appearances in advertisements. Lottery results: The Super Lotto Plus results in Friday's Section A said the information was for Wednesday, Jan. 10. The results were for Wednesday, Jan. 6. Wilcots obituary: The obituary of cinematographer Joseph M. Wilcots in Friday's Section A did not include two of his sisters in the list of survivors.
MAGAZINE
June 15, 2003 | KEN MORICO
"Venice West" has lost another voice. The passing of Beat painter and poet Saul White in May left fewer witnesses to the undersung bohemia that flourished in Venice Beach during the 1950s and '60s. But those who remain are still dancing with the muse.
OPINION
January 14, 2010
Tripping over tongues Re "Reid's indelicate remarks also carry a lot of truth," Column, and "Remarks from past may hurt Reid's future," Jan. 11 I don't know what all the fuss is about -- Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) was just spouting what he believes is the truth. An African American friend, who came from a time and place in which racism was not only practiced but accepted, told me that during the racially tense 1960s, the only white guy he trusted to speak the truth was then-segregationist Alabama Gov. George Wallace.
NEWS
May 31, 2007
TODAY BOOKS Rickles reflects The legendary insult comic often referred to as "Mr. Warmth," Don Rickles, shares his insights and reflections in his new memoir, "Rickles' Book." Perhaps surprisingly, it's a feel-good autobiography brimming with stories about the luminaries who populated his world: Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Johnny Carson and Bob Newhart. And let's not forget the audiences of the last 50 years who have been savaged by his razor-sharp, merciless wit. Don Rickles, Book Soup, 8818 W.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
When Mildred Newman first visited California in the early 1960s and saw what her son Earl had made of himself among the poets, folk singers, bongo beaters and scruffy street people of beatnik Venice, she began to cry. He had rented an abandoned former bar near the beach and dubbed it Gallery Venice. The front room was for the silk-screen printing that soon would establish him as the leading poster artist chronicling L.A.'s folk and jazz Bohemia.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Sitting by a swimming pool on a warm night as a party raged around him, local gallery owner John Natsoulas was explaining the purpose of a weekend conference focusing on visual art of the Beat generation. He had cited San Francisco galleries, Venice sculptors and New York poets when he spotted an image closer to hand: a longhaired 6-year-old, naked as a cherub, cavorting in the pool. "This is what it's all about!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1993 | KATHIE JENKINS
It was a bad week for Los Angeles restaurants. With the long-debated city smoking ban taking effect, restaurant owners were bombarded with complaints from angry customers. On top of that, the passage of President Clinton's budget reduced the deductibility of business meals from 80% to 50% and could severely depress expense-account trade for restaurants, already hurt by the lingering recession.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1989 | COLMAN ANDREWS
The patron saint of Venice, Italy, is San Marco --Saint Mark. Who knows who's the patron saint of L.A.'s Venice, but an extravagant restaurant and jazz club, scheduled to open here in mid-September, has borrowed the good saint's name. St. Mark's is the work of Francois Petit (former manager of Venice's West Beach Cafe and Rebecca's) and two partners, Mike Quinn and Warner Scharf.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | SHAUNA SNOW
FACES "It's the Nina, the Pinta and the Santa Maria," said sculptor Stephen Glassman as he glanced with a proud fatherly smile at "Eagle," "Bear" and "Snake," the three pieces of his "Zoo" installation in the courtyard next to the Santa Monica Museum of Art. "They're like Christopher Columbus' ships--they're vehicles to explore some new frontiers and they're meant to take some risks."
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