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BUSINESS
October 10, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American shoppers who have become accustomed to seeing New Zealand lamb in the meat case of their supermarkets will soon find it accompanied by farm-raised venison from the South Pacific island nation. "We think we have an interesting product, and we can use the healthy characteristics of venison to create awareness of this," Michael Pattison, who heads the New Zealand Deer Farmers Assn., said during a stop in Los Angeles, the U.S.' leading venison market.
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MAGAZINE
February 3, 2002 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
At Saddle Peak Lodge in Calabasas, I cut into a medallion of elk: It's butter-tender, yet lean, with an elusive, delicate flavor that matches the Burgundy I'm drinking nuance for nuance. With no heavy sauce to mask its flavor, it's set off by a raft of roasted salsify wrapped in apple-smoked bacon. Lost in the conversation, the food and the wine, I look up and catch the eye of a regal elk surveying the scene from high on the wall.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Busch has been raising deer on his ranch outside Santa Paula for a decade, quietly waiting for a venison boom. In a world where cattle, pigs and sheep are the norm, Busch raises fallow deer that will eventually end up on dinner plates at rustic and chichi restaurants alike. The retired anesthesiologist became one of only a handful of deer farmers in the state 10 years ago, hoping to cash in on an increasingly health-conscious public. What he got instead were squeak-by profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ralph Busch has been raising deer on his ranch outside Santa Paula for a decade, quietly waiting for a venison boom. In a world where cattle, pigs and sheep are the norm, Busch raises fallow deer that will eventually end up on dinner plates at rustic and chichi restaurants alike. The retired anesthesiologist became one of only a handful of deer farmers in the state 10 years ago, hoping to cash in on an increasingly health-conscious public. What he got instead were squeak-by profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993
Bambi burgers? What's next, fawn fajitas ? No thanks. Low fat or not, it's all too hard to swallow. Venison is one trend to buck (Nov. 11). DENNIS O'GORMAN Santa Monica
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Reuters
The entrepreneurial spirit thrives in the U.S. livestock industry, with farmers and ranchers raising new and exotic livestock. In Minnesota, domesticated deer are raised in a feedlot where cattle were once fed, and ostriches roam on a Texas ranch next to quarter horses and Thoroughbreds. "The ostrich industry is over 100 years old, but not in the United States," said Cooper Campbell, who started raising the birds on his Odessa, Tex., horse ranch three years ago.
FOOD
March 19, 1987 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Until recently, the only game that came to the table was the kind carried on a hunter's back. Things are different now. With few exceptions, game sold in markets today is farmed, not hunted, to meet the increasing consumer demand for exotic foods. Bob Alcorn of Alcorn Wholesale Meat Co. in Cypress, a wholesaler of commercially farmed game, thinks that consumers' rising interest in exotic foods has caused a rise in his business.
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Dutch returned the salute of an American brig of war on Nov. 16, 1776, the Netherlands became the first foreign nation to recognize the sovereignty of the United States. However, it wasn't until 1991 that then-President George Bush established that date as Dutch-American Heritage Day, honoring the 8 million Americans of Dutch ancestry, nearly 100,000 of whom live in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998
As winter approaches, farm-raised venison is showing up on more and more menus across town. Chefs are matching the tender, lean red meat with winter fruits, root vegetables, wild mushrooms--and chestnuts. * Rix: Chef Neal Fraser roasts Cervena venison from New Zealand and serves it with winter greens, kabocha squash flan, a huckleberry demi-glace and apple turnip conserve. Also look for venison on game tasting menus. (Venison, $25.) Rix, 1413 5th, Santa Monica, (310) 656-9688.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1998 | From Times wire reports
A fledgling church in a decaying section of Johnstown, Pa. asked deer hunters to donate their kill to help feed the poor. Vic Cafeo, a former construction foreman who is now pastor of the Praise and Worship Center, and parishioner Willeam Choby, a Johnstown dentist, coordinated their efforts with Hunters Sharing the Harvest. They received about 280 pounds of donated meat from seven deer, or 560 meals. "As soon as we got them, they were gone," Choby said. "Next year, we'd like 10 times that."
NEWS
November 30, 1999 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the Dutch returned the salute of an American brig of war on Nov. 16, 1776, the Netherlands became the first foreign nation to recognize the sovereignty of the United States. However, it wasn't until 1991 that then-President George Bush established that date as Dutch-American Heritage Day, honoring the 8 million Americans of Dutch ancestry, nearly 100,000 of whom live in Southern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1998
As winter approaches, farm-raised venison is showing up on more and more menus across town. Chefs are matching the tender, lean red meat with winter fruits, root vegetables, wild mushrooms--and chestnuts. * Rix: Chef Neal Fraser roasts Cervena venison from New Zealand and serves it with winter greens, kabocha squash flan, a huckleberry demi-glace and apple turnip conserve. Also look for venison on game tasting menus. (Venison, $25.) Rix, 1413 5th, Santa Monica, (310) 656-9688.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1998 | From Times wire reports
A fledgling church in a decaying section of Johnstown, Pa. asked deer hunters to donate their kill to help feed the poor. Vic Cafeo, a former construction foreman who is now pastor of the Praise and Worship Center, and parishioner Willeam Choby, a Johnstown dentist, coordinated their efforts with Hunters Sharing the Harvest. They received about 280 pounds of donated meat from seven deer, or 560 meals. "As soon as we got them, they were gone," Choby said. "Next year, we'd like 10 times that."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1993
Bambi burgers? What's next, fawn fajitas ? No thanks. Low fat or not, it's all too hard to swallow. Venison is one trend to buck (Nov. 11). DENNIS O'GORMAN Santa Monica
NEWS
November 11, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When rancher Ralph Busch looks at his latest crop, he sees bucks. Big bucks. The sleek brown and white buck with the No. 2 ear tag weighs a good 240 pounds. The lean white one in the neighboring pasture might be closer to 160. And the black one butting his antler-shorn head against a rival seems to fall somewhere in between. Peering through the eight-foot fence, the sprightly white-haired rancher nods approvingly. "The heaviest ones, we'll sell," he says.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1989 | From Reuters
The entrepreneurial spirit thrives in the U.S. livestock industry, with farmers and ranchers raising new and exotic livestock. In Minnesota, domesticated deer are raised in a feedlot where cattle were once fed, and ostriches roam on a Texas ranch next to quarter horses and Thoroughbreds. "The ostrich industry is over 100 years old, but not in the United States," said Cooper Campbell, who started raising the birds on his Odessa, Tex., horse ranch three years ago.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | MARY ESCH, Associated Press
On a windy hillside above their home, Eliot and Susanne Clarke are surrounded by broad-antlered stags and wide-eyed does, some spotted, some russet or smoky with fat, white bellies, all jostling for their morning ration of corn. "Hello, Bighorn," Susanne Clarke says, scattering kernels as about 150 goat-sized fallow deer crowd around. "Here, Moose-Nose." Although they are docile and curious, following the Clarkes around the field like a pack of puppies, the deer are not pets.
MAGAZINE
February 3, 2002 | S. IRENE VIRBILA
At Saddle Peak Lodge in Calabasas, I cut into a medallion of elk: It's butter-tender, yet lean, with an elusive, delicate flavor that matches the Burgundy I'm drinking nuance for nuance. With no heavy sauce to mask its flavor, it's set off by a raft of roasted salsify wrapped in apple-smoked bacon. Lost in the conversation, the food and the wine, I look up and catch the eye of a regal elk surveying the scene from high on the wall.
BUSINESS
October 10, 1988 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
American shoppers who have become accustomed to seeing New Zealand lamb in the meat case of their supermarkets will soon find it accompanied by farm-raised venison from the South Pacific island nation. "We think we have an interesting product, and we can use the healthy characteristics of venison to create awareness of this," Michael Pattison, who heads the New Zealand Deer Farmers Assn., said during a stop in Los Angeles, the U.S.' leading venison market.
FOOD
March 19, 1987 | ROSE DOSTI, Times Staff Writer
Until recently, the only game that came to the table was the kind carried on a hunter's back. Things are different now. With few exceptions, game sold in markets today is farmed, not hunted, to meet the increasing consumer demand for exotic foods. Bob Alcorn of Alcorn Wholesale Meat Co. in Cypress, a wholesaler of commercially farmed game, thinks that consumers' rising interest in exotic foods has caused a rise in his business.
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