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SCIENCE
September 30, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Chinese red-headed centipede is one of those creepy-crawlies you might run from. But its venom appears to hold potentially powerful medicine against pain, a group of researchers in Australia and China has found. Properly distilled and purified, the arthropod's venom proved a more potent analgesic in mice than morphine, and at doses 10 time higher than those used, appeared to have no physiological side effects such as changes in heart rate or blood pressure. That makes the colorful centipede's venom more promising as a painkiller than certain spider venoms, which operate on the same mechanism but which also affected heart function, muscles and nerves in ways that made the venoms fatal to rats.
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NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The Hennessey Performance Venom GT barreled down the space shuttle landing runway at Kennedy Space Center recently, blazing a speed record -- faster than previous record-setting supercars and faster than the space shuttle when it touches down. The Venom GT hit 270.49 mph. The previous record was the Bugatti Veyron Super Sport, which clocked 267.80 mph. The space shuttle touches down at a relatively sedate 225 mph. Video of the record chase was a winner on YouTube with more than 600,000 views as of Tuesday morning.
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SCIENCE
October 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Honeybees have defensive weapons at both ends of their bodies, Greek and French researchers have found: They can not only sting their enemies, as has long been known, but they can also bite them, injecting a venom that paralyzes invaders. The venom might be useful as an anesthetic in humans and other animals, the researchers speculate, and a British company has already patented the application and conducted preliminary tests suggesting that the venom works much like the well-known lidocaine.
SCIENCE
September 30, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
The Chinese red-headed centipede is one of those creepy-crawlies you might run from. But its venom appears to hold potentially powerful medicine against pain, a group of researchers in Australia and China has found. Properly distilled and purified, the arthropod's venom proved a more potent analgesic in mice than morphine, and at doses 10 time higher than those used, appeared to have no physiological side effects such as changes in heart rate or blood pressure. That makes the colorful centipede's venom more promising as a painkiller than certain spider venoms, which operate on the same mechanism but which also affected heart function, muscles and nerves in ways that made the venoms fatal to rats.
NEWS
February 26, 1985 | United Press International
A man embittered over the breakup of his marriage is suspected of killing his 78-year-old mother-in-law with an injection of snake venom from a green mamba, West German news reports said Monday. According to the Frankfurt newspaper Abendpost and the Deutsche Presse-Agentur news agency, the suspect accosted his estranged wife's mother as she was setting out for church one morning in November. "You caused my marriage to break up," he reportedly said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1995 | From Times staff reports
Why could the mongoose Rikki Tikki Tavi attack deadly snakes with impunity in Kipling's "Jungle Book?" Because he has a uniquely mutated receptor for a brain neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The toxins in many snake venoms, including that of cobras, bind to the acetylcholine receptors of their victims, blocking nerve-muscle communications. Molecular biologist Sara Fuchs and her colleagues found that the acetylcholine receptor in mongooses--like that in the snakes themselves--is slightly mutated so that the venom simply bounces off the muscle cells, causing them no harm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2011 | By Carol Rosenberg, Miami Herald
If snake venom holds the secret to a long life, then Bill Haast had the magic. The man who mesmerized generations of paying customers from 1947 to 1984 by extracting venom at his spine-tingling Miami Serpentarium attraction died of natural causes Wednesday at his home in Punta Gorda, on Florida's west coast. He was 100. Born William E. Haast on Dec. 30, 1910, in Paterson, N.J., he became a south Florida celebrity for surviving successive venomous snakebites. His wife, Nancy, last week put his lifetime tally at 172. The legacy left him immunized, she said, enabling him to donate life-saving blood to 21 victims through the years.
SCIENCE
January 25, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Not only do they hide in shoes and dark corners, waiting to sting the unwitting, but scorpions also pack a secret weapon, researchers reported. Certain species secrete a painful and paralyzing "pre-venom" in addition to the normal poison used to kill enemies and prey, a team at UC Davis found.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1986
Your erudite correspondent, forced me to scurry to my lexicon to decipher his veritable volley of verbal venom. What a prolix protagonist of verbosity! He could simply have said: "I harbor an abhorrent aversion toward all Democrats" Period. HAL ELIAS Los Angeles
SPORTS
September 18, 1993
Football season would be heaven if it were not for Gene Wojciechowski and Steve Harvey. If Wojciechowski doesn't drown readers with his pompous ignorance, Harvey will get them with his venom. DON ALLEN Pacific Palisades
IMAGE
March 12, 2013 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Justice Department employees in the Civil Rights Division's voting section have shown a "disappointing lack of professionalism" during the Bush and Obama administrations, according to an independent review that found a polarizing culture, with many staffers venting frustration in personal emails and blog posts filled with racial and other epithets. The department's inspector general's office is sending its findings, released Tuesday, to top Justice Department officials for possible discipline or other administrative action against three unidentified employees.
AUTOS
November 27, 2012 | By W.J. Hennigan
Texas auto tuner Hennessey Performance Engineering has lifted the veil on its latest turbocharged road demon: the Venom GT2. According to Hennessey, the $1.25-million hypercar, which will debut in late 2013, packs a 7.0-liter twin turbo V8 engine producing up to 1500 horsepower. Check this out: The new Venom is expected to zip from zero to 60 mph in just 2 seconds, finish a quarter-mile drag race in 8.8 seconds and have a top speed of 287 mph. PHOTOS: Hennessey Performance Engineering's Venom GT2 hypercar Company founder John Hennessey said there have been aerodynamic improvements to the modified Lotus Elise body, specifically changes to the side mirrors, roof and front air dam. There is a seven-speed paddle shift transmission option available.
IMAGE
November 11, 2012 | By Kavita Daswani, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Here is a selection of some new offerings at the prestige end of the market, many predicated on exclusive ingredients and newfangled technology: Super Cream from 3LAB, exclusively at Barneys, joins that brand's high-priced roster but remains its most expensive launch to date. Co-founder Erica Chung attributes the $875 price to the cream's Intelligent Targeting Device technology, which is supposed to drive collagen and elastin to the cells that need it the most. The Bee Venom Mask from Heaven Skin Care became an overnight sensation when word came out that Kate Middleton, wife of England's Prince William, used it. Soon to be available in the U.S., the $560 Limited Edition Golden Bee Venom Mask contains a high concentration of bee venom, which is supposed to have something of a Botox effect on the skin.
SCIENCE
October 30, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Honeybees have defensive weapons at both ends of their bodies, Greek and French researchers have found: They can not only sting their enemies, as has long been known, but they can also bite them, injecting a venom that paralyzes invaders. The venom might be useful as an anesthetic in humans and other animals, the researchers speculate, and a British company has already patented the application and conducted preliminary tests suggesting that the venom works much like the well-known lidocaine.
SCIENCE
October 3, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Nobody wants to be bitten by a black mamba. One of the most dangerous snakes in the world, its venom can kill a person in less than half an hour. But a new study reports that there is something besides deadly toxin hidden inside the snake: a powerful painkiller that works as well asĀ  morphine but without the side effects. In the report, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers from France described two previously unknown pain-killing peptides extracted from the mamba toxin.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012
MUSIC There's working-class venom in Kurt Vile's lyrics, and each arrangement is carefully laid out with the most sharply intricate of electric guitar leads. Vile doesn't sing so much as slur, but the feel is one of effortlessness rather than laziness, as if this bitter slacker has no choice but to stand on stage with his guitar. Largo, 366 N. La Cienega Blvd., L.A. 8 p.m. Thu. $25. largo-la.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2008
JEFFREY FLEISHMAN'S article "Director Shines a Light on Arabs' Plight in America" [Dec. 23] was superb. Egyptian-born Hesham Issawi's "American East" has shown us that radical Islamists may have attacked the U.S. on 9/11, but subjecting Arab Americans to particular venom is wrong. Issawi's film has provided us the ultimate lesson: When differences in religion or ethnicity give birth to hatred, that is when the terrorists have won. Evan Dale Santos Adelanto
NEWS
December 13, 1992
Re "Rattlers Vent Their Venom" (Nov. 26): Now it's my turn to vent my venom. In his most informative story, Berkley Hudson talks of the dangers of certain snake bites. He talks about "the world's most poisonous." This is the Mojave green. The Mojave green's venom can kill a dog in minutes. I know. One got into my back yard and killed Lacie, my best four-legged friend. Several months later, another got into my yard and bit another of my elkhounds. Duke was lucky. We had antihistamine in the house, supplied by the vet following the attack on Lacie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2012
I remember, many years ago a mexicano working in a sweat shop on E Street by the library. I could see him through the window - a tailor by trade. Thought about asking him to make me a suit for graduation. His fingers were so thin, so dark. Usually, he labored on a sport coat. Could tell the owner had granted him privacy. He seemed happy and at ease.
BUSINESS
April 4, 2012 | By David Undercoffler, Auto Critic
Lest you worry that auto shows were only focusing on the latest lean and green offerings from automakers, Chrysler Group used the 2012 New York International Auto Show to unveil the all-new SRT Viper. Although it's no longer under the Dodge nameplate and instead falls under the SRT brand responsible for performance variants of several Chrysler products, this 2013 Viper picks right up where its predecessor left off two years ago. It's powered by an all-aluminum, 8.4-liter V-10 that produces 640 horsepower and 600 pound-feet of torque.
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