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Venom

NEWS
July 13, 2001 | MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of the day, House members weren't just divided--they were bitter. There would be no debate into the wee hours on the merits of campaign finance reform. For now it was--if not dead exactly--then in a coma, put there by a normally routine procedural vote that failed, 228 to 203. The outcome flashed in orange lights on the scoreboard high above the chamber floor as ordinary citizens looked on from the gallery. Crowded into the chamber, House members glared across the aisle.
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SPORTS
April 11, 2001 | JASON REID, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kevin Brown has been especially ornery because the Dodgers put him on the disabled list against his wishes. The right-hander believed he could have started opening day despite his right Achilles' tendon injury, and Brown's disposition did not improve Tuesday night in the Arizona Diamondbacks' 2-0 victory before 29,191 at Bank One Ballpark.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2001 | STEPHEN HARTKE, Stephen Hartke is a composer and professor at the USC Thornton School of Music. He lives in Glendale
Musicians and critics view each other with morbid fascination. One group works with the incorporeal reality of sound and the other with the translation of that experience into personal opinion. The art of music is ultimately timeless while the craft of criticism is at best transitory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2000 | JAMES P. PINKERTON, James P. Pinkerton, who writes a column for Newsday in New York, worked in the White House of President George Bush. E-mail: pinkerto@ix.netcom.com
Politics hath no fury like the fury of a woman scorned. And no woman has been more scorned than Katherine Harris, Florida's Republican secretary of state. But last night, after nearly three weeks of abuse from Democrats and the media, Harris hath had her revenge. The loser, of course, is Al Gore. And the winner, maybe, is George W. Bush. Yet even greater furies have been loosed in the three weeks since election day, far fiercer than during the campaign itself.
OPINION
November 26, 2000 | CLANCY SIGAL, Clancy Sigal is a novelist and screenwriter
A Soviet general in World War II once gave an order of the day: "Bury the dead. Send back the wounded. All the rest, forward!" George W. Bush, it now appears more likely than ever, is our new president. My losing side--the liberals, progressives, radicals, tree-huggers, Naderites, ardent Gore Democrats--probably will cut one another up in tiny bloody ribbons of factional venom and blame-calling. It's happening already.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
"Snakebit," at the Coast Playhouse, could use more bite. Or maybe a snake. True, three of the four characters are beset by problems and anxieties. They might indeed think of themselves as snakebit. But no snakelike person shows up as the source of their woes--and the venom from at least some of their troubles isn't as severe as it initially appeared. The fourth character, an up-and-coming actor who's on the verge of a big movie role, looks like a snake at first glance.
HEALTH
August 30, 1999 | JONATHAN FIELDING and VALERIE ULENE, Dr. Jonathan Fielding is the director of public health and health officer for the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Dr. Valerie Ulene is a board-certified specialist in preventive medicine practicing in Los Angeles
Few people get through life without the pain or discomfort of a sting by a bee, yellow jacket, hornet or wasp, and many of us are stung more than once. For those who are allergic to the insect venom, these seemingly minor encounters can cause serious, even life-threatening complications. Each of these types of insects can trigger an allergic reaction. Some people are allergic to the venom of several of these insects, others to only one or two.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Michael Eisner will eat lunch in this town again. In fact, Hollywood muckrakers and gossip mongers would do better dusting off their copies of Julia Phillips' 1991 mean kiss-and-tell than picking up a copy of Eisner's new autobiographical business book, "Work in Progress," which they'd undoubtedly find a yawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world premiere here of "Antz"--a gala screening and party complete with red carpets and oversized martinis--marked the grand finale of the 23rd Toronto International Film Festival on Saturday night. But it was just the start of what is shaping up to be a cutthroat and unusually personal battle of the cinematic bugs. DreamWorks SKG's computer-animated satire about an ant who wants to be his own man features the voices of Woody Allen, Sharon Stone, Gene Hackman and Sylvester Stallone.
HEALTH
August 31, 1998 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II
Snake venom may hold the promise of fighting breast cancer, according to USC researchers. While studying the properties of copperhead snake venom, biochemist Francis Markland and his colleagues told an American Chemical Society meeting last week in Boston that the venom contains a protein that could block tiny cells known as platelets from binding together. They then figured the protein might help slow the growth of cancer by blocking the invasive actions of tumor cells, Markland said.
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