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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The first California condor cam took flight in Big Sur Monday, allowing the public and scientists a glimpse of the endangered bird in the wild. The solar-powered webcam , installed by the Oakland Zoo and Ventana Wildlife Society,  is the first to monitor the largest North American land bird in the wild and will aid preservation efforts, according to the society. But viewers beware. Listed below the live stream is a message for visitors: "Viewer discretion advised.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Animal lovers from around the world will have a chance to view the release of four endangered California condors Tuesday morning, thanks to another new webcam that will live stream the event online. At 10 a.m. PDT, Ventana Wildlife Society biologists in collaboration with the Oakland Zoo will swing open an enclosure door and watch as the condors transition into the wild. There will be two cams up and running, viewable here and here . But in a news release, Ventana Wildlife Society Executive Director Kelly Sorenson tried to temper expectations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Los Angeles Times Staff
Animal lovers from around the world will have a chance to view the release of four endangered California condors Tuesday morning, thanks to another new webcam that will live stream the event online. At 10 a.m. PDT, Ventana Wildlife Society biologists in collaboration with the Oakland Zoo will swing open an enclosure door and watch as the condors transition into the wild. There will be two cams up and running, viewable here and here . But in a news release, Ventana Wildlife Society Executive Director Kelly Sorenson tried to temper expectations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
A record high 21 endangered California condors were treated at the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens for lead poisoning in October -- more than half what of the center sees in a typical year, officials reported. The zoo's announcement comes just weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation requiring hunters to use non-lead ammunition in an effort to keep the toxic element from being passed on from carcasses to scavengers, such as condors. Adam Keats, senior counsel and urban wildlands program director for the Center of Biological Diversity, attributed the high quantity of condor poisonings to hunting activity.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2010 | By Tom Bentley
THE BEST WAY TO PINNACLES From LAX, United, American and US Airways fly to Monterey, 12 miles from Salinas. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $286. Or you can drive the 235 miles from Los Angeles. PINNACLES NATIONAL MONUMENT (831) 389-4485, http://www.nps.gov/pinn. $5 entrance fee, good for seven days. Parking is limited. There is no road through the park connecting its east and west entrances. WHERE TO STAY Inn at the Pinnacles, 32025 Stonewall Canyon Road, Soledad, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2013 | By Alicia Banks
A record number of 21 endangered California condors were treated at the Los Angeles Zoo and Botanical Gardens for lead poisoning in October - more than half of what the center sees in a typical year, officials reported. The zoo's announcement comes just weeks after Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation requiring hunters to use non-lead ammunition in an effort to keep the toxic element from being passed on from carcasses to scavengers, such as condors. Adam Keats, senior counsel and urban wildlands program director for the Center for Biological Diversity, attributed the high quantity of condor poisonings to hunting.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Field biologist Joe Burnett was standing at the base of a tree in Big Sur when the giant, limp body of a California condor landed at his feet. Even before his team learned the official cause of death, they knew it was lead poisoning from the telltale signs they'd seen earlier in the bird, such as weight loss and erratic behavior. "What happens to the condors as a result of lead poisoning - it's not pretty," said Burnett, who tracks California condors around the state for the Ventana Wildlife Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
A top Interior Department official Saturday announced $3.9 million in federal grants to restore wetlands and habitat for migratory birds in California and elsewhere. Acting Interior Department Secretary Lynn Scarlett made the announcement at Stone Lakes National Wildlife Refuge here to mark International Migratory Bird Day. "The grants will go internationally for birds that transcend continents," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Among the residents of Big Sur displaced by the fire are dozens of endangered California condors that have been carefully bred and released into the Ventana Wilderness. Two weeks ago, the Coast Guard airlifted eight young birds that were not ready for release from a holding pen at Andrew Molera State Park in Big Sur to another shelter at Pinnacles National Monument east of the Salinas Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2009 | Associated Press
A California condor captured on the Central Coast because it appeared to be sick was not only suffering from lead poisoning but also had been shot, animal experts said Friday. Unable to eat on its own, the condor was under intensive care at the L.A. Zoo, and its prognosis was guarded, birds curator Susie Kasielke said. X-rays taken at the zoo showed shotgun pellets embedded in its flesh, Kasielke said. Those wounds had healed over, and it could not be determined when they occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
The first California condor cam took flight in Big Sur Monday, allowing the public and scientists a glimpse of the endangered bird in the wild. The solar-powered webcam , installed by the Oakland Zoo and Ventana Wildlife Society,  is the first to monitor the largest North American land bird in the wild and will aid preservation efforts, according to the society. But viewers beware. Listed below the live stream is a message for visitors: "Viewer discretion advised.
SCIENCE
June 25, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
Field biologist Joe Burnett was standing at the base of a tree in Big Sur when the giant, limp body of a California condor landed at his feet. Even before his team learned the official cause of death, they knew it was lead poisoning from the telltale signs they'd seen earlier in the bird, such as weight loss and erratic behavior. "What happens to the condors as a result of lead poisoning - it's not pretty," said Burnett, who tracks California condors around the state for the Ventana Wildlife Society.
TRAVEL
April 25, 2010 | By Tom Bentley
THE BEST WAY TO PINNACLES From LAX, United, American and US Airways fly to Monterey, 12 miles from Salinas. Restricted round-trip fares begin at $286. Or you can drive the 235 miles from Los Angeles. PINNACLES NATIONAL MONUMENT (831) 389-4485, http://www.nps.gov/pinn. $5 entrance fee, good for seven days. Parking is limited. There is no road through the park connecting its east and west entrances. WHERE TO STAY Inn at the Pinnacles, 32025 Stonewall Canyon Road, Soledad, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2010 | By Steve Chawkins
When Condors 317 and 318 got together, nobody knew their affair would make history. But scientists believe that this week, for the first time in more than a century, a California condor was hatched in Pinnacles National Monument, a wilderness that used to be home to the magnificent raptor. Mother and chick are doing fine, said Kelly Sorenson, executive director of the Ventana Wildlife Society, a group that collaborates on condor programs with the National Park Service. Once common in California, condors ran head-on into housing developments and hunters, dying from ingesting lead, antifreeze and other toxic substances.
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