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BUSINESS
June 24, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1997, David Perry, a mid-level oil refinery manager who had just completed his MBA at Harvard Business School, had a big idea. Perry envisioned a technology to let businesses buy or sell products or raw materials anywhere in the world over an online system managed by a neutral provider. His business plan won second place in Harvard's annual competition. Soon after, he drove his decade-old Nissan Maxima west to Silicon Valley in search of venture-fund gold.
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BUSINESS
June 24, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1997, David Perry, a mid-level oil refinery manager who had just completed his MBA at Harvard Business School, had a big idea. Perry envisioned a technology to let businesses buy or sell products or raw materials anywhere in the world over an online system managed by a neutral provider. His business plan won second place in Harvard's annual competition. Soon after, he drove his decade-old Nissan Maxima west to Silicon Valley in search of venture-fund gold.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Broadlane Inc., a joint venture between hospital operator Tenet Healthcare Corp. and online medical supplier Ventro Corp., will combine its product-purchasing business with that of AmeriNet Inc., the largest U.S. health-care group-buying business. As part of the agreement, Broadlane will own about 25% of closely held AmeriNet and AmeriNet will own an undetermined amount of Broadlane. The combined organization will have revenue of about $7 billion. Santa Barbara-based Tenet is the No. 2 U.S.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Neoforma.com Inc., which operates an Internet marketplace that connects buyers and sellers of medical goods, said it is in merger talks with health-care software company Eclipsys Corp. and Healthvision Inc., an Internet health-care company.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While most of the frenzy over e-commerce has focused on Internet shops selling books and toys to consumers, a small group of largely unheralded companies has begun rushing for the real gold mine of the future--business-to-business e-commerce. In recent months, once-obscure companies such as Mountain View-based Ariba Inc. and WebMethods Inc. of Fairfax, Va.
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