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Ventura County Behavioral Health Department

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2005 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
The lemon-yellow duplexes adorned with Doric columns and rose gardens had the look of a freshly built suburban housing tract. That they are in fact communal housing for the mentally ill says something about who built them: developer and business magnate David H. Murdock. Murdock used his own money to build the $4.5-million complex of single-story duplexes on a 2.75-acre parcel near Camarillo owned by Ventura County. On Wednesday, the chief executive of Dole Food Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2005 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
The lemon-yellow duplexes adorned with Doric columns and rose gardens had the look of a freshly built suburban housing tract. That they are in fact communal housing for the mentally ill says something about who built them: developer and business magnate David H. Murdock. Murdock used his own money to build the $4.5-million complex of single-story duplexes on a 2.75-acre parcel near Camarillo owned by Ventura County. On Wednesday, the chief executive of Dole Food Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Linda Shulman, acting director of the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department, has been hired for the permanent position. The Board of Supervisors voted unanimously in closed session Tuesday to offer her the job. Shulman has been performing the director's duties in the year since supervisors fired former director David Gudeman, citing poor management. Shulman, 41, is a psychologist and earned a master's degree in business administration from the University of Nevada Las Vegas in 1996.
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April 9, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
Ventura County's Behavioral Health Department will present a progress report Wednesday on how Proposition 36 is working. The law, passed in November 2000, lets certain nonviolent drug offenders receive substance-abuse treatment rather than jail time. Since July, hundreds in the county have received such treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
The former director of Ventura County's Behavioral Health Department has been hired as medical director of Simi Valley Hospital's behavioral health unit. David Gudeman, a UCLA-trained psychiatrist and internist, began his current job July 24. He oversees the hospital's 32-bed, acute-care psychiatric unit, which is a locked, inpatient facility for adults. "His ability and expertise will be an asset to the hospital as a whole and to this community," said Margaret R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1999
As a psychiatric social worker who recently retired from the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department after 17 years of service, it is my impression that Steve Kaplan is being wrongly targeted for punishment following the breakdown of the merger between the Public Social Services Administration and Behavioral Health. Steve researched the options quite carefully and in fact proposed that Behavioral Health become free-standing from the Health Care Agency as a first choice before considering a merger of the two agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 2000
Psychologist Michael Wells Lorr of Ventura died Wednesday after a rain-related automobile accident in Moorpark. He was 55. Lorr was born Feb. 29, 1944, in Takoma Park, Md., where he grew up and attended school. He completed undergraduate work at Oberlin University in Ohio and received a doctorate in psychology from the University of Iowa in 1972. In the mid-1980s, he moved to Ventura and was later employed by the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department in Simi Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997 | FRED ALVAREZ
AIDS Care will host daylong conferences Monday and Tuesday aimed at educating health care professionals about HIV prevention and risk reduction. The event, designed to reach out to people who provide service or care to alcohol and drug users, will offer a variety of workshops, including one dealing with cultural factors in substance abuse and another focusing on issues surrounding needle exchange and bleach distribution programs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1998
I am the medical director of the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department but I am writing this as a private, tax-paying citizen of the county of Ventura. On April 7, our Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 2 to merge the Behavioral Health Department with the welfare department to form the new Human Services Agency, bringing with it the 43-bed Hillmont Psychiatric Hospital and all the outpatient mental health and alcohol and drug clinics. While on the surface it is presented as a merger, in my opinion it was a move to subordinate mental health to welfare because the head of the new department is the current director of the Public Social Services Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1999 | PAMELA J. JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After receiving clearance from the state Department of Mental Health, Ventura County will submit $16 million worth of Medi-Cal claims it has been withholding for 10 months, officials said Monday. "Based on a cursory review of both your billing system and some clinical charts, it is recommended that you resume submitting claims immediately," state officials wrote in an Aug. 27 letter to David Gudeman, director of the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1999
It is striking that all of the debate around the changes in the Ventura County Behavioral Health Department Systems of Care has focused on the impact to services for the adult mentally ill although the department also includes the drug and alcohol program and the children's mental health system. The controversy has focused primarily on administrative problems. There has been little discussion about programs and policies that work. As a professional social worker in the children's mental health system, it has been my experience that the programs in place greatly benefit the children and families we serve.
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