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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Naval personnel rang bells, blew whistles and hoisted colorful flags in a tradition-steeped ceremony Wednesday to mark the merger of two bases into one. At 10:30 a.m., a color guard lowered the Point Mugu Naval Air Station flag for the last time. In its place rose the blue-and-white flag of Naval Base Ventura County, a new command that officially consolidates the Naval Air Station with the nearby Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2002 | Holly J. Wolcott, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County remained the most crime-free urban area in the West last year, and a falling crime rate made it the sixth safest metropolitan region in the nation, new FBI data show. It was the ninth consecutive year that the affluent coastal county has had the lowest crime rate in the 13 Western states for an area with at least 50,000 residents. No urban area west of Pennsylvania had a lower rate of major criminal offenses last year, according to the FBI's annual Uniform Crime Reports.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Naval personnel rang bells, blew whistles and hoisted colorful flags in a tradition-steeped ceremony Wednesday to mark the merger of two bases into one. At 10:30 a.m., a color guard lowered the Point Mugu Naval Air Station flag for the last time. In its place rose the blue-and-white flag of Naval Base Ventura County, a new command that officially consolidates the Naval Air Station with the nearby Naval Construction Battalion Center in Port Hueneme.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tired of being considered quasi-Indians by the federal government, two Chumash groups from Ventura County are pushing the federal government for official recognition, a difficult and contentious process but one with potentially lucrative rewards. The Bureau of Indian Affairs must decide when a Native American tribe is really a Native American tribe. Over the years, the bureau has established government-to-government ties with hundreds of them--from the Cherokees to the Choctaws to the Paiutes.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Native American blood runs through their veins, and their Indian pride rivals that of any Navajo or Apache. But in the eyes of the federal government, most of the thousands of Chumash living in Southern California are Indians without a tribe. It is the Bureau of Indian Affairs that decides when a group of Indians is really a tribe and, over the years, the bureau has established government to government ties with hundreds of them--from the Cherokees to the Choctaws to the Paiutes.
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