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Ventura County Cablevision

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BUSINESS
November 1, 1994 | Jack Searles
Whether you're ready or not, the interactive TV business is coming to Ventura County. Ventura County Cablevision, which has 90,000 household subscribers, about 70,000 of them in the county, expects to offer interactive programming in the second quarter of next year. In an arrangement with ACTV Inc.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996
I feel a significant amount of frustration every time I flip through the channels on television and pass by a station known to the "folks" here in suburbia as TNN. The Nashville Network--to be official--seems to be the craze among residents here in Ventura County. I never knew being a cowboy could be so easy. That is fine for the Caucasian population, but why hasn't Ventura County Cablevision reached out to the other side of the spectrum and brought in BET (Black Entertainment Television)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1996
I feel a significant amount of frustration every time I flip through the channels on television and pass by a station known to the "folks" here in suburbia as TNN. The Nashville Network--to be official--seems to be the craze among residents here in Ventura County. I never knew being a cowboy could be so easy. That is fine for the Caucasian population, but why hasn't Ventura County Cablevision reached out to the other side of the spectrum and brought in BET (Black Entertainment Television)
SPORTS
July 7, 1995 | ETHAN SKOLNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are watching the Angels on television. Catcher Jorge Fabregas--another in an endless queue of lollygaggers--scratches himself, steps out, scratches himself again. An itch comes over you like a tall wave over a bad surfer. You yearn for a pitch clock, a fast-forward button, a ban on scratching. You eye the refrigerator, the remote, the laundry you could be washing. You need statistics, trivia, anything to render this viewing experience more tolerable. InTV has just the fix for you.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993
My wife and I received the letter from Ventura County Cablevision detailing the upcoming changes. As aptly pointed out in your Sept. 1 article, the great majority of us--"the folks in the middle"--will at best save a few pennies. A review of our new charge shows we will be paying an additional $1.74 per month, and for what? Ventura County Cablevision President David T. LaRue says that we will be getting an additional 14 channels. However, he goes on to say that to provide these additional channels they need to install additional equipment.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | LARRY JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's first commercial interactive television network will begin broadcasting on Ventura County Cablevision in May, company officials said. The network will be marketed as TVI: Television Interactive and tested initially in the Westlake area. The cable service says that by September it hopes to provide the service to 1,000 subscribers on the eastern edge of Ventura County and western area of Los Angeles County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
Notice to all parents with cable TV: I recently found out about a situation that I consider disturbing and since I was able to correct it, I would like to share this with other Conejo Valley parents. I found out that it was possible to tune in most of Channel 53 and watch a not-very-scrambled pornographic channel (Spice-1) that runs 24 hours a day. The picture was similar to a photo negative that once in a while had lines which blurred out most of the video but still showed quite a bit of pornographic material.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987 | ANDREW S. DOCTOROFF, Times Staff Writer
Deregulation of the cable television industry nationwide, which went into effect Jan. 1, is expected to have less impact on prices paid for cable service in the San Fernando Valley area than in the rest of the country. State legislation passed in 1979 and extended in 1982 already deregulated prices for most of the Valley area's cable TV companies.
SPORTS
July 7, 1995 | ETHAN SKOLNICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are watching the Angels on television. Catcher Jorge Fabregas--another in an endless queue of lollygaggers--scratches himself, steps out, scratches himself again. An itch comes over you like a tall wave over a bad surfer. You yearn for a pitch clock, a fast-forward button, a ban on scratching. You eye the refrigerator, the remote, the laundry you could be washing. You need statistics, trivia, anything to render this viewing experience more tolerable. InTV has just the fix for you.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1995 | LARRY JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's first commercial interactive television network will begin broadcasting on Ventura County Cablevision in May, company officials said. The network will be marketed as TVI: Television Interactive and tested initially in the Westlake area. The cable service says that by September it hopes to provide the service to 1,000 subscribers on the eastern edge of Ventura County and western area of Los Angeles County.
BUSINESS
November 1, 1994 | Jack Searles
Whether you're ready or not, the interactive TV business is coming to Ventura County. Ventura County Cablevision, which has 90,000 household subscribers, about 70,000 of them in the county, expects to offer interactive programming in the second quarter of next year. In an arrangement with ACTV Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1994
Notice to all parents with cable TV: I recently found out about a situation that I consider disturbing and since I was able to correct it, I would like to share this with other Conejo Valley parents. I found out that it was possible to tune in most of Channel 53 and watch a not-very-scrambled pornographic channel (Spice-1) that runs 24 hours a day. The picture was similar to a photo negative that once in a while had lines which blurred out most of the video but still showed quite a bit of pornographic material.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1993
My wife and I received the letter from Ventura County Cablevision detailing the upcoming changes. As aptly pointed out in your Sept. 1 article, the great majority of us--"the folks in the middle"--will at best save a few pennies. A review of our new charge shows we will be paying an additional $1.74 per month, and for what? Ventura County Cablevision President David T. LaRue says that we will be getting an additional 14 channels. However, he goes on to say that to provide these additional channels they need to install additional equipment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1987 | ANDREW S. DOCTOROFF, Times Staff Writer
Deregulation of the cable television industry nationwide, which went into effect Jan. 1, is expected to have less impact on prices paid for cable service in the San Fernando Valley area than in the rest of the country. State legislation passed in 1979 and extended in 1982 already deregulated prices for most of the Valley area's cable TV companies.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | Compiled by Jack Searles
Ventura County Cablevision, which serves 70,000 households throughout the county, apparently is about to be acquired by the nation's largest cable operator. Ventura County Cablevision is part of a group of cable systems that Tele-Communications Inc., based in Englewood, Colo., says it will purchase from The Chronicle Publishing Co. Chronicle, publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle, plans to sell all its cable systems to the Colorado company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1993 | STEPHANIE SIMON
Faced with a year-end deadline for renewing franchise agreements with Falcon and Ventura County Cablevision, the Thousand Oaks City Council on Tuesday will consider extending current contracts six months. Council members Alex Fiore and Jaime Zukowski, who form the Cable TV Franchise Renewal Committee, are recommending the six-month extension to give negotiations more time.
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