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Ventura County District Attorneys Office

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
A consulting firm has found chronic problems in the Ventura County district attorney's office, including low pay, intense pressure to perform and managers who cause workers to fear for their jobs. "Many people in the district attorney's office feel undervalued both as professionals and as human beings," Los Angeles-based Strategic Business Ethics reported in a 17-page summary after interviews with dozens of workers in April.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
A two-year corruption investigation in Oxnard uncovered "a clear pattern of fiscal waste by a small number of city officials" but produced no criminal charges, the Ventura County district attorney's office said Wednesday. The probe began in July 2010 when local investigators and FBI agents raided city offices, and later searched the homes of numerous officials. It yielded more than 100,000 pages of evidence, according to a lengthy report issued by prosecutors. Investigators found city officials had failed to disclose gifts from contractors, tried to delay the D.A.'s investigation, used public funds for expensive meals and submitted skimpy, often unsigned financial records that made it impossible to prosecute possible violations.
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NEWS
February 24, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Simi Valley newspaper has raised the ire of Ventura County law enforcement authorities who accuse the publication of blowing the surprise of a planned sting operation designed to catch lawbreakers. The newspaper's managing editor, however, says at least some of the sting targets had already figured out that they were about to be stung. According to the Simi Valley Enterprise, police wrote to 100 people telling them they would get free lottery tickets if they appeared today at a local hotel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2005 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
The Ventura County district attorney's office found no evidence that the Thousand Oaks City Council violated the state's open meeting law in its dealings with a former city manager. The investigation, which the district attorney's office considers closed, centered on the circumstances surrounding the promotion, performance and retirement of former City Manager Phil Gatch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2005 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
The Ventura County district attorney's office found no evidence that the Thousand Oaks City Council violated the state's open meeting law in its dealings with a former city manager. The investigation, which the district attorney's office considers closed, centered on the circumstances surrounding the promotion, performance and retirement of former City Manager Phil Gatch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
A two-year corruption investigation in Oxnard uncovered "a clear pattern of fiscal waste by a small number of city officials" but produced no criminal charges, the Ventura County district attorney's office said Wednesday. The probe began in July 2010 when local investigators and FBI agents raided city offices, and later searched the homes of numerous officials. It yielded more than 100,000 pages of evidence, according to a lengthy report issued by prosecutors. Investigators found city officials had failed to disclose gifts from contractors, tried to delay the D.A.'s investigation, used public funds for expensive meals and submitted skimpy, often unsigned financial records that made it impossible to prosecute possible violations.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County Deputy Dist. Atty. Ron Bamieh shook his head as he read the 5-year-old case file for the first time. Why hadn't anybody solved this murder? In 1992, an attractive 20-year-old Santa Monica College student, Katrina Montgomery, disappeared after leaving a party in Oxnard. Her bloodstained truck was found abandoned on a winding mountain road. Within days, police had identified three suspects--all linked to a violent white power gang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1993
Michael D. Bradbury, District attorney, Ventura County With the economic plight facing local governments, there are likely to be instances in which private sources are sought to provide certain needs. Often this occurs indirectly. For example, government may have to look more to private organizations to assist the poor and needy. Unfortunately, the same weak economy has resulted in many such organizations having their own budget problems. A public program, such as the investigation and prosecution of workers' compensation fraud supported by private dollars, does not necessarily mean that there would be prioritized service to the donors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1987
The Ventura County district attorneys' office will not seek a new penalty trial for a Van Nuys man convicted of murder, a spokesman said Friday. Prosecutors had sought the death penalty in the case, but a Ventura Superior Court jury on May 14 deadlocked on the issue, voting 7 to 5 in favor of life in prison without parole for Arthur Ankerstrom, 60, who was convicted in April of killing an Ojai Valley restaurant manager.
NEWS
April 30, 2001 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County Deputy Dist. Atty. Ron Bamieh shook his head as he read the 5-year-old case file for the first time. Why hadn't anybody solved this murder? In 1992, an attractive 20-year-old Santa Monica College student, Katrina Montgomery, disappeared after leaving a party in Oxnard. Her bloodstained truck was found abandoned on a winding mountain road. Within days, police had identified three suspects--all linked to a violent white power gang.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999
A consulting firm has found chronic problems in the Ventura County district attorney's office, including low pay, intense pressure to perform and managers who cause workers to fear for their jobs. "Many people in the district attorney's office feel undervalued both as professionals and as human beings," Los Angeles-based Strategic Business Ethics reported in a 17-page summary after interviews with dozens of workers in April.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1993
Michael D. Bradbury, District attorney, Ventura County With the economic plight facing local governments, there are likely to be instances in which private sources are sought to provide certain needs. Often this occurs indirectly. For example, government may have to look more to private organizations to assist the poor and needy. Unfortunately, the same weak economy has resulted in many such organizations having their own budget problems. A public program, such as the investigation and prosecution of workers' compensation fraud supported by private dollars, does not necessarily mean that there would be prioritized service to the donors.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Simi Valley newspaper has raised the ire of Ventura County law enforcement authorities who accuse the publication of blowing the surprise of a planned sting operation designed to catch lawbreakers. The newspaper's managing editor, however, says at least some of the sting targets had already figured out that they were about to be stung. According to the Simi Valley Enterprise, police wrote to 100 people telling them they would get free lottery tickets if they appeared today at a local hotel.
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