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NEWS
March 17, 1990
The Times this week began publication of a daily Ventura County Edition with local news and advertising in Part B seven days a week. A weekly section called Ventura County Life will appear Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001
In the Ventura County Edition of The Times on Sept. 7, Dist. Atty. Michael Bradbury is quoted in regard to the recent death of child rapist and killer Theodore Frank, who died from natural causes: "Although man's justice failed, God's did not." Bradbury is truly an extraordinary district attorney; he understands the operation of two justice systems--ours and God's. Knowing this, I feel much more secure. DORIS FERBER Ventura
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NEWS
March 12, 1990
The Times today begins publication of a daily Ventura County Edition. Local news begins on page B1. A new weekly section called Ventura County Life will debut on Thursday. The edition will be produced by a staff in Ventura and printed at the Times Valley plant in Chatsworth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | KEVIN F. SHERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the most spectacular pieces of artwork at the Ventura County Fair will be destroyed hours after the fair's final day. Just inside the main entrance, sand sculptor Alan Matsumoto of Roanoke, Va., was finishing his 10-foot-tall work Monday after a week of work. Matsumoto used 25 tons of construction sand donated by a local contractor. The sculpture is held together by nothing more than the right amount of water. "It's a very forgiving medium," Matsumoto said. "It's easy to work with."
NEWS
March 15, 1990
The Times today launches a new weekly section called Ventura County Life. Its debut is part of the Ventura County Edition which began this week. The section contains suggestions for leisure activities, entertainment news and articles on life styles and entertainment. It will appear each Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2000
Contributions for the Ventura County Perspective page are welcome. Please send them to Perspective, Ventura County Edition, Los Angeles Times, 93 S. Chestnut St., Ventura CA 93001. They may be faxed to (805) 653-7576 or sent via e-mail to ventura@latimes.com. Unused manuscripts cannot be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1990
As a 10-year subscriber to the Los Angeles Times, I wish to commend you for the expanded Ventura County Edition. It's nice to be accepted as part of the Los Angeles metropolitan area! Your format of breaking the county into geographic districts makes it easy to locate purely Oxnard news. I'm looking forward to in-depth articles by your reporters on affordable housing, landfills, air pollution, slow growth and juvenile gangs. ERNEST WHITAKER Oxnard
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2001
In the Ventura County Edition of The Times on Sept. 7, Dist. Atty. Michael Bradbury is quoted in regard to the recent death of child rapist and killer Theodore Frank, who died from natural causes: "Although man's justice failed, God's did not." Bradbury is truly an extraordinary district attorney; he understands the operation of two justice systems--ours and God's. Knowing this, I feel much more secure. DORIS FERBER Ventura
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997
Bill Overend, city editor of the Ventura County Edition of The Times since 1992, has been named editor of the edition. The Times also announced the appointment of Doug Adrianson, an assistant editor in Life & Style, as the editor of the Ventura County Edition's new editorial page, which will begin publication on Sundays this summer. Overend replaces Julia C. Wilson, who was recently named president of the Valley and Ventura County editions and a vice president of The Times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1994
Life in California continues to exhibit humor, even during the current disaster. Day 5 of "Diary of a Disaster" starts out this way: "The portable toilets stank. The lines were long. The paperwork was endless." Glad they had the paper. BILL GOURLAY Westlake Village The Ventura County Edition of The Times welcomes the views of readers. Letters should be as brief as possible and are subject to condensation. They must include signature, valid mailing address and telephone number.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | BILL OVEREND
Just a few weeks ago The Times received an honor that had special meaning for the reporters, editors and photographers of the paper's Ventura County Edition. In addition to winning the Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting this year, the paper was selected as a finalist in five other Pulitzer categories. And one of those was for spot news coverage of last year's Alaska Airlines crash off the Ventura County coast.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2001
Contributions for the Ventura County Perspective page are welcome. Please send them to Perspective, Ventura County Edition, Los Angeles Times, 93 S. Chestnut St., Ventura 93001. They may be faxed to (805) 653-7576 or sent via the Internet to ventura@latimes.com. Unused manuscripts cannot be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ventura County Edition of the Los Angeles Times has won 41 awards for excellence in the sixth annual Ventura County Press Club contest--including 16 of 27 first-place prizes for daily newspapers. Times reporters won almost all the major news writing categories, taking top prizes for breaking news, beat coverage, investigative reporting, in-depth coverage, best series, editorial writing, continuing coverage, business reporting and sports writing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL

Vice Mayor Sees Burbl, which would be achieved by using the east-west runway. At this point, I think that it's important to get that issue on the table and get it settled once and for all. Look at the history of the usage of the easterly departures and, prior to FAA restrictions, you have less than 3% for safety reasons. And while we're doing a project to increase the safety of the airport, it probably doesn't make sense to leave a large loophole of uncertainty where people who currently live to the east of the airport are going to be asking, "Who will prevail politically, and then will political considerations overcome safety considerations, and will there be flights diverted to the east, whereas now, due to the topography, there aren't?" : Q: Many residents of the eastern San Fernando Valley say that most of the noise generated by the airport affects them. : A: Anyone who takes a look at the noise contour map will understand that's simply not true. That there's a lot of noise impact in the city of Burbank. I happen to live south of the airport, where we get considerable impact, so it's not fair to say that Burbank is trying to just push all the airport noise outside the city limits. One of our goals was not to make someone better off by making somebody else worse off. Our goal was to try to mitigate the noise impacts overall with some reduction in the nighttime noise environment and with some additional protections against the louder Stage 2 and the Stage 3 "hush kit" aircraft, which helps everybody without shifting the noise. I think shifting the noise is a zero-sum game. In this particular case, probably a larger group would be worse off just by the nature of the takeoff pattern. If you do take off to the east you have to bank hard and circle around so you end up flying over more residential areas than you would otherwise. That's why we asked that the authority, as part of the deal, to seek a ban on easterly takeoffs. It doesn't say they must obtain one in order to build a terminal, so it's really a different type of provision that we put in there. : Q: Who decides whether to ban easterly takeoffs? : A: The final decision would be in the hands of the FAA, which is what we think is appropriate. But we also don't think it's appropriate to be silent on that issue and leave it for another day. : Q: Has the FAA given an opinion on easterly takeoffs? : A: They're currently opposed to easterly takeoffs, due to the proximity of the terminal. The Airline Pilots Assn. also has opposed easterly takeoffs. The FAA is a political animal, and I think everybody deserves the right to know what's going to happen. People in Burbank are going to be moving forward with a new terminal that's going to remove restrictions on easterly takeoffs. The people have a right to know what the impact of that will be. : Q: Who has the last word on closing the terminal at night? : A: The Airport Authority currently closes the terminal. It's been a long-standing practice of theirs to close the terminal at night. So we believe it's the Airport Authority's final say on that. However, there are a lot of people who potentially are impacted and the Airport Authority works under the jurisdiction of the FAA. So we think the answer to that is probably a pretty broad group. The FAA asked us to propose a local solution and that's what we've done. : Q: How long do you think it will take to hammer out a final agreement? : A: I think it's going to take some time just because of the various approvals and requirements that are in the process, and we have to look at the impacts of a new terminal, assess them and go through a public hearing process. There's some zone changes that are involved so my best guess is we're probably looking at a total of six to nine months, but that could vary depending on the events. It's been a very long-running dispute, so the resolution of it is going to take time. We've already made some progress with the adoption of the escrow agreement on behalf of the Airport Authority and the city of Burbank. Hopefully the hard work ahead of us will be in crafting an agreement that everyone can live with. : Q: The opposition of Reps. Howard Berman (D-Mission Hills), Brad Sherman (D-Sherman Oaks) and Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles) seems formidable. Do you see this as a major obstacle to the agreement? : A: I don't see it as a major impediment to the agreement, but we would certainly want to take into consideration their opinions and work with them. But I frankly believe that the benefits of this agreement far outweigh the things they see as the downside. Hopefully, they'll see the benefits to their constituents by improving the overall noise environment in general at the airport. And we would certainly want to work hard with them on that. I think we could achieve a lot more of everyone's goals if the FAA were a little more flexible and a little more willing to cooperate, so I'm sure we'll be talking to them about how we can achieve that. : Q: Do you approve putting this up for a vote? : A: Yes. I approved of putting it to a vote for Burbank residents. If you go back about seven years ago when I was first elected to the [Burbank City] Council and we were considering approving a 19-gate phase one terminal and a 27-gate phase two terminal, I argued vociferously that it should be put to a vote of the people because of the significance of the issue. I don't think the significance of the issue has changed. I think a nonbinding vote would really get a sense of the community. You don't come along 10 years later and say, "Whoops, we made a mistake and made the airport too large; we're sorry." It's there for good. So I think it would be good to hear from the people of Burbank. I think they will support the agreement that has been proposed. : Q: What about the people of Los Angeles? : A: Our first responsibility is to the citizens of Burbank, but that doesn't mean that we trample on the rights of the city of Los Angeles. We've complained bitterly that the cities of Pasadena and Glendale trampled on our rights, and I guess Los Angeles could make that same argument that [its] constituents come first. So, I think we're trying to find a balance there. The hardest part is that the complaint of the Los Angeles residents is, "We wanted you to make our environment better by imposing more impact on your constituents." I'm not sure that's a balance that makes sense. I think we would support initiatives that try to make it better for everybody, but in terms of just saying, "Let's shift more of the flights to the east," it doesn't make sense. We've tried to come up with protections that would make their lives better, just as we would protect our residents who live to the south of the airport and are faced with similar impacts. So I don't think we're turning our backs on the residents of Los Angeles. : Q: Would you be in favor of an advisory vote for the people of the San Fernando Valley? : A: We're trying to get the input from the people in Burbank. We'll certainly hear from the people who live in the San Fernando Valley, but I think we're going to limit it to our constituents. I don't think we would propose going and polling citizens of Glendale either. By putting it on the ballot, obviously every affected party will have their chance to put their arguments forth and we will see what our community decides. : Q: If an advisory vote were closer than you anticipated, or even on the negative end, would you then go back and do the agreement again? : A: Yes. And we told the airport authority from Day One that if this agreement doesn't haven't the support of our community, then we won't be supporting it. We think it's a good agreement and we'll go out there and make our opinions known. We'll go out there and do our best to educate people. But if our community comes out overwhelmingly negative against the thing, I think the chances the council will move forward in the face of that are very, very slim. : Q: In that case, why not make it a binding vote? : A: It's really just a matter of practicality. If you make it a binding vote, then you have to draft some pretty specific, detailed language that is going to tie your hands. And I could see getting caught up in a situation that would really not work. If you spell out certain provisions, and at some point in time during the process the FAA says, "We're not going to allow that particular stipulation, you have no flexibility to possibly substitute one plan for another. : Q: Based on that, I assume you're opposed to the ballot initiative that has been discussed. : A: I think the proposed initiative is a proposal to ensure that a new terminal doesn't get built. That's not what I believe the residents of Burbank desire. And everyone has said that we would support a replacement terminal if the Airport Authority would give up its grand expansion plans and work with us. I think we're trying to live up to that commitment. : * : Bob Rector is opinion editor for the San Fernando Valley and Ventura County editions of The Times. : (BEGIN TEXT OF INFOBOX / INFOGRAPHIC)

October 3, 1999
Preparing for Takeoff Negotiators for the city of Burbank and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority reached a tentative agreement Wednesday on a new terminal to replace the current facility, which dates to 1930. The new terminal--which must still be approved by the Burbank City Council--would be built in three phases. The first phase includes construction of a 330,000-square-foot terminal with 14 gates and 5,000 parking spaces. It could be expanded to 430,000 square feet, with 19 gates and 8,000 parking spaces, contingent upon reduction of noise levels and adoption of a flight curfew and cap on the number of annual passengers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1999
Ventura County Life Doug Adrianson sits in with some old-time fiddlers and discovers the music is as fresh as ever. Workplace Violence Some county businesses are resorting to extensive background checks and psychological tests to keep workplaces free of violence. Editorial Education at all levels in Ventura County has never been more available, or more important. Perspective Managed, sustained growth is necessary if our children are to be able to buy homes where they grew up, writes Jon Haines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1999
Close to the top of any list of major concerns in Ventura County is the subject of crime. The fact that we are one of the safest counties in the nation doesn't stop us from worrying about how to become even safer, nor should it. Starting on Monday, we will be adding a new column called Crime Watch. It will go beyond the usual crime stories in the paper to give you insights on local crime trends and specific problems around the county. Sometimes there is a humorous side to a police officer's job. Often, there is heroism and just plain good detective work.
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