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Ventura County Government

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1999 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The depiction of Ventura County government as facing near financial chaos is overblown, county supervisors said Tuesday, and they already are taking steps to deal with a ballooning deficit and vacuum in leadership. Supervisor John K. Flynn said a sweeping denunciation of county fiscal practices by former Chief Administrative Officer David L. Baker does not put the expected $5-million deficit this year into perspective.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2007 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County supervisors Wednesday appointed Marty Robinson, 57, as the county's next chief executive officer, the first woman to hold the county's top post. Robinson officially will take the reins of the $1.6-billion government next spring, when outgoing county chief Johnny Johnston retires. Until then, the two will work together to ensure a smooth transition, Robinson said. "I'm elated," Robinson said shortly after the board's unanimous vote. "I'm so appreciative of their faith in me.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2001
Ventura County government received a high credit rating on the short-term notes it takes out each year to carry it until tax receipts are collected in November, officials said Tuesday. Standard & Poor's assigned the county a 1+ rating, but long-term bond ratings have not been released yet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2006 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County government has its healthiest budget in five years, but that doesn't mean cities should line up for handouts, a top official cautioned Tuesday. A continuing boom in home sales is pushing the percentage increase in property tax receipts into double digits, and sales tax is not far behind, said County Executive Officer Johnny Johnston.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2000
Columbus Day will be observed Monday. The following schedules will be in effect: Closed: The U.S. Postal Service, Ventura County Superior Court, schools in the Ventura Unified, Simi Valley Unified, Moorpark Unified and Conejo Unified school districts, many banks. Open: Most other schools, most businesses, all city and Ventura County government offices. Transit: Ventura County Transit buses will operate on normal schedule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1999
From widespread power and sewage failures to breakdowns in hospital services, Ventura County government is prepared to deal with any possible Y2K computer crises, according to a final grand jury report released Friday. As many as 40 technical employees will work New Year's Eve and throughout the holiday weekend to deal with computer glitches. In addition, dozens of deputies will be on hand at an emergency operations center set up at the Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1991 | RON SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the morning after his surprise resignation, and Bob Braitman was reflecting on the seemingly embarrassing note upon which his long career in Ventura County had ended. "I am who I am. If my zest for life has offended some people, I apologize for that." A sexual harassment complaint filed against Braitman, 44, executive officer of the Local Agency Formation Commission, by his senior analyst, Lynne Kada, 55, was settled and signed Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2000
Some things never change in the way Ventura County government operates. Political cronyism, for example. When County Auditor-Controller Tom Mahon announced plans to retire next month--two years ahead of schedule--three members of the Board of Supervisors were quick to endorse Mahon's hand-picked deputy to complete the term.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999
If Ventura County government looked like an impenetrably thorny briar patch to David L. Baker, its tangle of stealth budgeting and back room alliances should feel more familiar--if not entirely comfortable--to Harry L. Hufford.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1997 | NICK GREEN
With potentially millions of dollars at stake, Ventura County officials will petition the state Supreme Court to reconsider a ruling that could boost retirement benefits for thousands of county workers. The Board of Supervisors on Wednesday approved filing a petition with the court by Aug. 29. The court is expected to decide whether to review its ruling by next month. The Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2005 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Ventura County government workers would receive an average 6% raise under a labor pact that supervisors tentatively approved Tuesday. About half of the county's 8,000-employee workforce is covered under the two-year contract, which also gives workers extra money for healthcare expenses. Service Employees International Union, Local 998 tentatively endorsed the contract July 5. Its membership will vote on it Friday, said Eileen Connelly, spokeswoman for the local.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2005 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
A legal tussle over pension benefits for Ventura County government workers is being tracked closely for its potentially costly effect on other public retirement systems in California. The suit, brought by retiree George Mathews, contends that retired and active county government employees should have received enhanced pension benefits during the late 1990s, when the county's retirement system was flush with excess earnings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2004 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Mirroring trends nationwide, healthcare costs for Ventura County government workers will increase up to 18% in 2005, the fifth consecutive year the county has seen double-digit increases in health premiums, according to a new report and county officials. "This is a national problem -- trying to deal with the rising costs of healthcare," said Barry Zimmerman, a benefits manager in the Human Resources Division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2004 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Faced with a $36-million budget shortfall, Ventura County government managers are asking taxpayers to accept a host of painful cuts, from eliminating hot meals for homebound seniors to putting fewer police on patrol. What's not on the table are cuts in labor costs -- even though higher wages and benefits for county government's 8,000 employees are a major reason the Hall of Administration is in financial straits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2004 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Up to 600 Ventura County government workers could lose their jobs this summer if the state follows through on plans to shift local funding to Sacramento, County Executive Officer Johnny Johnston said Tuesday. Johnston came up with the layoff estimate after spending three days in the Capitol last week urging Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislators to keep local revenues intact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Pay and benefits for Ventura County government employees would be scoured for potential cost savings under a proposal put forth by two supervisors Tuesday. Supervisors Steve Bennett and Kathy Long asked their colleagues on the county board for a discussion of compensation issues at next week's meeting. The county needs to look at ways to further pare its $1.2-billion annual budget because of the growing state financial crisis, Bennett said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1993 | BRENDA DAY
Many of the services offered by Ventura County government will be on display Saturday in an open house at the East County Courthouse. Interested residents can see a demonstration of the Fire Department's Jaws of Life, a mechanism used to extract car accident victims from wreckage. Also on display will be a sheriff's helicopter and the bomb squad's robot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
Plenty of fights have taken place inside the Ventura County Government Center, home away from home for the Board of Supervisors and other battling county power brokers. But for one minute each winter, the bustling center gives peace a chance, thanks to Mother Nature and a quirk of architecture. If the weather is just right, sunlight pouring through glass-paned skylights aligns with support pillars, casting, in the view of some, five perfect peace sign shadows across the building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2003 | Catherine Saillant, Times Staff Writer
One Ventura County supervisor likened the just-passed state budget to a Ponzi scheme. Another doubted that legislators would follow through on a promise to repay money siphoned away from local government. For all their ire, however, officials Wednesday were relieved that budget managers can finally get down to the task of deciding how Ventura County government can best weather another round of potential job losses and program cuts.
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