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Ventura County Government Employees Labor Relations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
With a strike by government employees looming, county executive Johnny Johnston suggested Monday the county will have to make do with a "leaner, meaner work force" if demands for higher salaries and better benefits are met. A threatened walkout Friday by 4,200 clerks, receptionists, accountants, librarians and other general government workers was an unspoken but potent factor during the Board of Supervisors' budget deliberations Monday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government's largest labor union approved a tentative contract Friday, potentially ending its most acrimonious salary battle in a decade. Under the agreement, 4,200 general government workers would receive raises averaging 13% over four years. If the contract is quickly ratified, employees will see the pay increase beginning in their Oct. 18 checks, union leaders said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking workers blocked traffic at the Ventura County Government Center, shut down half of the county's libraries and halted some citrus inspections Wednesday on the first day of a walkout over pension benefits. While many departments functioned with little disruption, others felt the brunt of the first full strike in history by the county's largest employees union, representing 4,200 workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2001 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to keep workers off picket lines, Ventura County administrators and union officials have launched a search for an independent consultant to assess the cost of an expanded retirement package at the center of tense contract negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2001 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to keep workers off picket lines, Ventura County administrators and union officials have launched a search for an independent consultant to assess the cost of an expanded retirement package at the center of tense contract negotiations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government's largest employee union, seeking higher wages in stalled contract talks, has authorized a strike at the end of the month, union leaders said Thursday. But despite what he described as the largest turnout in the union's history, union chief Barry Hammitt refused to say how many members voted Wednesday night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Ventura County employees returned to work after an eight-day strike despite not having a contract but with hopes that their demands for better retirement benefits would be met. At the same time, residents who had stayed away from the county Government Center because of picketers ventured back to county offices for building permits, counseling and other services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV and TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concerned that a workers strike is threatening public safety and the economy, Ventura County officials have called an emergency meeting to expedite a new round of talks with labor negotiators. Board of Supervisors Chairman Frank Schillo said he has scheduled a 7:30 a.m. closed-door meeting Monday at the County Government Center. Schillo said he hopes the board can come up with a more attractive pension benefits plan to offer the 4,200-member union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County negotiators said Friday that they are hopeful they will be able next week to stave off a threatened strike by the county's largest employee union over increases in salaries and retirement benefits. Their hopes hinge on the union's willingness to suspend part of its demands for several months. Supervisor John Flynn said he is fairly confident an agreement will be reached. "We don't need a strike," he said. "And a strike will not be necessary if I have anything to say about it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With both sides hoping to avoid a strike, Ventura County government's largest employee union appeared to be closing in on a new labor contract Thursday after a day of intense negotiations with county leaders. "I think it's doable. But the county needs to restore some credibility that has been lost over the years," union chief Barry Hammitt said during a break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Ventura County employees returned to work after an eight-day strike despite not having a contract but with hopes that their demands for better retirement benefits would be met. At the same time, residents who had stayed away from the county Government Center because of picketers ventured back to county offices for building permits, counseling and other services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV and TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Concerned that a workers strike is threatening public safety and the economy, Ventura County officials have called an emergency meeting to expedite a new round of talks with labor negotiators. Board of Supervisors Chairman Frank Schillo said he has scheduled a 7:30 a.m. closed-door meeting Monday at the County Government Center. Schillo said he hopes the board can come up with a more attractive pension benefits plan to offer the 4,200-member union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striking workers blocked traffic at the Ventura County Government Center, shut down half of the county's libraries and halted some citrus inspections Wednesday on the first day of a walkout over pension benefits. While many departments functioned with little disruption, others felt the brunt of the first full strike in history by the county's largest employees union, representing 4,200 workers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2001 | MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County negotiators said Friday that they are hopeful they will be able next week to stave off a threatened strike by the county's largest employee union over increases in salaries and retirement benefits. Their hopes hinge on the union's willingness to suspend part of its demands for several months. Supervisor John Flynn said he is fairly confident an agreement will be reached. "We don't need a strike," he said. "And a strike will not be necessary if I have anything to say about it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With both sides hoping to avoid a strike, Ventura County government's largest employee union appeared to be closing in on a new labor contract Thursday after a day of intense negotiations with county leaders. "I think it's doable. But the county needs to restore some credibility that has been lost over the years," union chief Barry Hammitt said during a break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
With a strike by government employees looming, county executive Johnny Johnston suggested Monday the county will have to make do with a "leaner, meaner work force" if demands for higher salaries and better benefits are met. A threatened walkout Friday by 4,200 clerks, receptionists, accountants, librarians and other general government workers was an unspoken but potent factor during the Board of Supervisors' budget deliberations Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government's largest labor union approved a tentative contract Friday, potentially ending its most acrimonious salary battle in a decade. Under the agreement, 4,200 general government workers would receive raises averaging 13% over four years. If the contract is quickly ratified, employees will see the pay increase beginning in their Oct. 18 checks, union leaders said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County government's largest employee union, seeking higher wages in stalled contract talks, has authorized a strike at the end of the month, union leaders said Thursday. But despite what he described as the largest turnout in the union's history, union chief Barry Hammitt refused to say how many members voted Wednesday night.
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