Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVentura County Hospitals
IN THE NEWS

Ventura County Hospitals

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hospitals in eastern Ventura County are moving ahead with expansion plans, responding to population growth and greater demand for health care. Simi Valley Hospital this week revealed more details of an ambitious plan that includes construction of a $35-million patient care wing. And officials at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks said it has accepted $120 million from its parent company for a previously announced new wing.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2003 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Spurred on by a growing number of immigrants who say they are unable to talk to their doctors, farm worker advocates have launched a statewide campaign to break down language barriers and boost the number of interpreters in hospitals and other health-care facilities. The effort is aimed largely at people who are fluent in neither English nor Spanish, a population that includes recent arrivals from Southeast Asia and a rising number of Mexican immigrants who speak indigenous Indian languages.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a strong anti-sprawl movement and increased white flight, Ventura County grew nearly as fast as the rest of California in the 1990s and continued a 30-year transformation from a white farm region to a racially mixed suburban area. According to the 2000 census, the county's population increased 12.6% during the last decade, a pace far slower than its affluent demographic twin, Orange County, but much faster than Los Angeles County's 7.4%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2003 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
City councils from Santa Paula and Fillmore have vowed to save the Santa Clara Valley's beleaguered community hospital, while also pointedly demanding more financial information from the Tennessee company that runs the tiny medical center. In a rare joint meeting, the neighboring councils said they would do whatever it takes to keep the 39-bed Santa Paula Memorial Hospital open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
Most stories fit tidy categories like government, environment, politics. Or crime--which describes Ventura County's most sensational story of 1993: Alan Winterbourne, jobless for seven years, opens fire in the Oxnard unemployment office, killing three people. Later, he guns down a pursuing detective before dying himself in a barrage of police bullets. But woven into the Winterbourne saga are threads of some of the other big stories affecting the county this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2000
Supervisors on Tuesday asked county attorneys to pursue legal action, including a court injunction, to block a proposed ballot initiative that would strip Ventura County of more than $225 million in tobacco settlement funds and give the money to private health care providers. The Board of Supervisors decided to fight after County Counsel Jim McBride told the board he believes the initiative improperly usurps their authority. "It's unconstitutional," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | PHIL WILLON and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State health officials said Wednesday that they plan to investigate the case of an 11-month-old girl, stricken by a so-called flesh-eating bacteria and hospitalized in critical condition in Northridge, to determine whether she received proper medical care at Ventura County Medical Center. The action comes as questions are being raised about the delayed diagnosis and initial treatment of the potentially fatal disease, said Lana Pimbley of the state Department of Health Services.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Roehl Reyes shot to the ocean surface from a depth of 108 feet, his lungs felt as if they would explode. That was the last thing Reyes remembered before he blacked out. Dangerous nitrogen bubbles formed throughout his bloodstream, plunging his body deep into shock. A Coast Guard helicopter rushed his limp body from the waters near Anacapa Island to a decompression chamber at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2002 | KARIN GRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hospitals are facing a critical shortage of the antivenin used to treat rattlesnake bites at a time when the poisonous reptiles are most likely to come in contact with people venturing outdoors. "It's pretty bad," said Dr. Robert Levin, public health officer for Ventura County, where three people have been victims in the last month. "People who have been bitten by rattlesnakes may not have antivenin available to them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2003 | Fred Alvarez, Times Staff Writer
Spurred on by a growing number of immigrants who say they are unable to talk to their doctors, farm worker advocates have launched a statewide campaign to break down language barriers and boost the number of interpreters in hospitals and other health-care facilities. The effort is aimed largely at people who are fluent in neither English nor Spanish, a population that includes recent arrivals from Southeast Asia and a rising number of Mexican immigrants who speak indigenous Indian languages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2002 | KARIN GRENNAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hospitals are facing a critical shortage of the antivenin used to treat rattlesnake bites at a time when the poisonous reptiles are most likely to come in contact with people venturing outdoors. "It's pretty bad," said Dr. Robert Levin, public health officer for Ventura County, where three people have been victims in the last month. "People who have been bitten by rattlesnakes may not have antivenin available to them."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001 | MATT SURMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two hospitals in eastern Ventura County are moving ahead with expansion plans, responding to population growth and greater demand for health care. Simi Valley Hospital this week revealed more details of an ambitious plan that includes construction of a $35-million patient care wing. And officials at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks said it has accepted $120 million from its parent company for a previously announced new wing.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a strong anti-sprawl movement and increased white flight, Ventura County grew nearly as fast as the rest of California in the 1990s and continued a 30-year transformation from a white farm region to a racially mixed suburban area. According to the 2000 census, the county's population increased 12.6% during the last decade, a pace far slower than its affluent demographic twin, Orange County, but much faster than Los Angeles County's 7.4%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2000
Supervisors on Tuesday asked county attorneys to pursue legal action, including a court injunction, to block a proposed ballot initiative that would strip Ventura County of more than $225 million in tobacco settlement funds and give the money to private health care providers. The Board of Supervisors decided to fight after County Counsel Jim McBride told the board he believes the initiative improperly usurps their authority. "It's unconstitutional," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1998 | PHIL WILLON and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State health officials said Wednesday that they plan to investigate the case of an 11-month-old girl, stricken by a so-called flesh-eating bacteria and hospitalized in critical condition in Northridge, to determine whether she received proper medical care at Ventura County Medical Center. The action comes as questions are being raised about the delayed diagnosis and initial treatment of the potentially fatal disease, said Lana Pimbley of the state Department of Health Services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
Most stories fit tidy categories like government, environment, politics. Or crime--which describes Ventura County's most sensational story of 1993: Alan Winterbourne, jobless for seven years, opens fire in the Oxnard unemployment office, killing three people. Later, he guns down a pursuing detective before dying himself in a barrage of police bullets. But woven into the Winterbourne saga are threads of some of the other big stories affecting the county this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2003 | Daryl Kelley, Times Staff Writer
City councils from Santa Paula and Fillmore have vowed to save the Santa Clara Valley's beleaguered community hospital, while also pointedly demanding more financial information from the Tennessee company that runs the tiny medical center. In a rare joint meeting, the neighboring councils said they would do whatever it takes to keep the 39-bed Santa Paula Memorial Hospital open.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
United Blood Services, the nonprofit blood provider serving all eight Ventura County hospitals, is seeking donations. The blood bank had been building up its stock for the holiday weekend, but hundreds of units of blood were needed to treat shooting and stabbing victims last week, said Patty Hunt of United Blood Services. The blood bank needs an average of 110 donations daily, Hunt said. For an appointment, call 654-8104 or (800) 715-3699.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Roehl Reyes shot to the ocean surface from a depth of 108 feet, his lungs felt as if they would explode. That was the last thing Reyes remembered before he blacked out. Dangerous nitrogen bubbles formed throughout his bloodstream, plunging his body deep into shock. A Coast Guard helicopter rushed his limp body from the waters near Anacapa Island to a decompression chamber at Los Robles Regional Medical Center in Thousand Oaks.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|