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Ventura County Ordinances

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1991 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite protests, the Ventura County Board of Supervisors gave preliminary approval to a law prohibiting discrimination against residents with AIDS and other life-threatening illnesses. During an emotionally charged meeting, several speakers urged the supervisors to reconsider the ordinance, saying it would "open the floodgates," drawing people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome to Ventura County.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | From Times staff reports
Ventura County supervisors may consider changes to a new ordinance that mandates a minimum wage of $8 an hour for anyone who works for the county. Supervisor Steve Bennett called the changes a cleanup of the ordinance's language and said they are intended to include workers who perform services outside county facilities. Expanding the number of workers covered by the "living wage" ordinance will cost the county $50,000 more than the $1.2- million estimate, Bennett said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If it's true that Old MacDonald had a farm, you can bet his livestock didn't live in any city in Ventura County. He would have yelled "E-I-E-I-O" the minute a code enforcement officer knocked on his barn door and told him, "No moos here and no baas there--and you'll need a permit for a quack or a neigh everywhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minutes after a divided Ventura County Board of Supervisors approved a minimum-wage ordinance Tuesday, the man who led the yearlong fight to get it passed stood before jubilant supporters and vowed to take the movement to city halls across the county. "This is step one," said Marcos Vargas, head of the Ventura County Living Wage Coalition, made up of 42 faith, community and environmental groups. "We should relish this. But next, we're on to Oxnard, Ventura and Santa Barbara."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of lobbying from labor groups, a majority of county supervisors is poised to support an ordinance requiring county contractors to pay their employees a "living wage." Supervisors John Flynn, Steve Bennett and Kathy Long say they support a law that would require employees to be paid at least $8 an hour, plus health benefits, or $10 an hour without.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1993 | JEFF McDONALD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ventura County's larger employers won a reprieve Tuesday from the amount of paperwork they must file with county officials to prove they are complying with anti-smog laws to get more commuters to share rides to work. The changes adopted unanimously by supervisors basically allow companies with 100 or more workers to police their own programs to encourage at least one of every four employees to walk, ride a bike or join a car-pool to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | TINA DAUNT
County supervisors voted Tuesday to proceed with plans to withhold property taxes from Sacramento, joining a protest against Gov. Pete Wilson's plan to slash funds to local governments. At the urging of Supervisor Maggie Kildee, the board voted 4 to 0 to adopt an ordinance that bars the county's auditor-controller from turning over nearly $50 million in property tax revenue next year. At a time when the state is considering cutting its assistance to local governments by $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1993 | JEFF McDONALD
Supervisors overwhelmed by scores of county employees pleading their case not to reduce perquisites delayed consideration Tuesday of proposed revisions to Rule 210, the tough anti-smog ordinance. The staff recommendation, which proposes allowing businesses to certify themselves as being in compliance of a car-pooling regulation instead of compiling lengthy and costly reports, was continued until 10 a.m. next Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small businesses across Ventura County will soon be able to avoid tough anti-pollution rules that require their employees to car-pool, by instead helping the county get smog-belching clunkers off the road. The Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 1 Tuesday to allow medium-sized companies--those with 50 to 99 workers--to contribute $17 to $50 per employee to a county fund to purchase old exhaust-spewing cars from their owners and retire them to the junkyard.
NEWS
June 5, 1991 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County supervisors adopted the toughest air pollution control regulation on power plants in the nation Tuesday, capping a long-running battle between the county and Southern California Edison. Approval of the measure, which requires the utility to reduce emissions that contribute to smog by at least 88% over the next five years, was unanimous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 2001 | CATHERINE SAILLANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minutes after a divided Ventura County Board of Supervisors approved a minimum-wage ordinance Tuesday, the man who led the yearlong fight to get it passed stood before jubilant supporters and vowed to take the movement to city halls across the county. "This is step one," said Marcos Vargas, head of the Ventura County Living Wage Coalition, made up of 42 faith, community and environmental groups. "We should relish this.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2001 | TINA DIRMANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of lobbying from labor groups, a majority of county supervisors is poised to support an ordinance requiring county contractors to pay their employees a "living wage." Supervisors John Flynn, Steve Bennett and Kathy Long say they support a law that would require employees to be paid at least $8 an hour, plus health benefits, or $10 an hour without.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1997 | BRENDA LOREE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If it's true that Old MacDonald had a farm, you can bet his livestock didn't live in any city in Ventura County. He would have yelled "E-I-E-I-O" the minute a code enforcement officer knocked on his barn door and told him, "No moos here and no baas there--and you'll need a permit for a quack or a neigh everywhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1995 | ERIC WAHLGREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
County animal regulators hope that a proposal to require licenses for cats has nine lives, and are now encouraging Ventura County cities to adopt what the Board of Supervisors scratched earlier this year. * Kathy Jenks, Ventura County director of animal regulation, recently mailed a report outlining the benefits of cat licensing to seven cities in her department's jurisdiction. Ojai and Simi Valley officials will discuss the proposal during their city council meetings this week.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | DWAYNE BRAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two fishermen unloaded undersized halibut, angel shark and white sea bass into a small truck at the Ventura Harbor early one morning last December. But a warden from the California Department of Fish and Game reeled them in before they could flee. The warden discovered the protected species stashed inside large barrels and cited Nhon Tran, a commercial fisherman from Los Angeles, for violating half a dozen fishing laws. The second man was not charged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small businesses across Ventura County will soon be able to avoid tough anti-pollution rules that require their employees to car-pool, by instead helping the county get smog-belching clunkers off the road. The Board of Supervisors voted 3 to 1 Tuesday to allow medium-sized companies--those with 50 to 99 workers--to contribute $17 to $50 per employee to a county fund to purchase old exhaust-spewing cars from their owners and retire them to the junkyard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2001 | From Times staff reports
Ventura County supervisors may consider changes to a new ordinance that mandates a minimum wage of $8 an hour for anyone who works for the county. Supervisor Steve Bennett called the changes a cleanup of the ordinance's language and said they are intended to include workers who perform services outside county facilities. Expanding the number of workers covered by the "living wage" ordinance will cost the county $50,000 more than the $1.2- million estimate, Bennett said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1993 | TINA DAUNT
Ventura County supervisors plan to consider an ordinance that would prohibit the state from using local property tax money to balance its budget. At the recommendation of Supervisor Maggie Kildee, the board on Tuesday directed county staff to prepare a report on a recently adopted ordinance in Contra Costa County that bars the auditor there from turning over property tax revenue to Sacramento. At a time when the state is considering taking away $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993 | JEFF MEYERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over the objections of environmentalists, the Board of Supervisors today is expected to loosen smog requirements for the county's medium-sized businesses. The board will vote on proposals to allow companies with between 50 and 99 workers to participate in a less restrictive and less costly program than the county's tough ride-sharing program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1993 | TINA DAUNT
County supervisors voted Tuesday to proceed with plans to withhold property taxes from Sacramento, joining a protest against Gov. Pete Wilson's plan to slash funds to local governments. At the urging of Supervisor Maggie Kildee, the board voted 4 to 0 to adopt an ordinance that bars the county's auditor-controller from turning over nearly $50 million in property tax revenue next year. At a time when the state is considering cutting its assistance to local governments by $2.
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