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Venus Planet

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NEWS
September 26, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Venus, a planet that started out like the Earth but took a dramatic turn somewhere along the way, is turning out to be a geological candy store as it lays bare its soul for the Magellan spacecraft. Photographs released Tuesday by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory show a planet that is pockmarked with giant impact craters large enough to swallow Los Angeles and a twisted, tormented landscape that has been molded by forces that are still not understood.
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WORLD
November 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
A European-built probe designed to explore the hot, dense atmosphere of Venus blasted off early today on a Russian booster rocket, beginning a five-month journey to the nearest planet to Earth. The European Space Agency's Venus Express probe lifted off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Europe's first mission to Venus will concentrate on exploring the planet's greenhouse effect and the permanent hurricane-force winds that encircle it.
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NEWS
April 24, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Magellan spacecraft has begun its second mapping of the planet Venus, and scientists are hoping that not everything looks the same the second time around. Scientists will be looking for areas where something has changed since the same region was first mapped several months ago. Changes could reveal active volcanoes and other geological or atmospheric processes on the planet.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A celestial spectacle will occur Monday evening when Venus and the moon will appear close together in the western sky. Venus will outshine every star in the sky and will probably be as bright as the moon, which will have only about 15% of its disk showing. Venus is so brilliant because it is closer to the sun than the Earth is and because its clouds reflect sunlight.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By skipping an aging satellite over the atmosphere of Venus like a flat stone on a rippling lake, NASA has demonstrated the feasibility of building cheaper planetary probes in the future--and made it possible to wring another year of science from an old craft already in space.
SCIENCE
February 21, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A celestial spectacle will occur Monday evening when Venus and the moon will appear close together in the western sky. Venus will outshine every star in the sky and will probably be as bright as the moon, which will have only about 15% of its disk showing. Venus is so brilliant because it is closer to the sun than the Earth is and because its clouds reflect sunlight.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Associated Press
Galileo's camera shutter snapped uncontrollably for five hours Saturday after the spacecraft zipped around Venus, but officials said it should not endanger the $1.35-billion, eight-year mission to Jupiter. Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory shut off the television camera while they diagnosed the problem, which apparently involved faulty software that made Galileo's computer send incorrect commands to the camera, mission director Neal Ausman said.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory who are trying to nurse the Magellan spacecraft back to good health believe both of the failures that hit the Venus orbiter last month may have resulted from a single cause rather than multiple problems. Furthermore, it may not be necessary to fully understand the cause of the twin communications blackouts in order to work around the problem, said JPL scientist Stephen Wall.
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Magellan spacecraft has responded to more than 80,000 commands and has sent back more bits of data from Venus than was collected during the entire missions of the Voyager, Viking and Mariner spacecrafts, scientists said Tuesday. Yet despite images that tell experts more about the hot, smoldering planet than they know about some areas of the moon, scientists continue to disagree over the powerful forces that molded the tortured surface of Venus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
While a new era of missions to Mars is beginning, explorations of our nearest planetary neighbor are coming to a close, at least for the foreseeable future. Two spacecraft that have collected far more detail than expected about Venus are preparing to send their last rounds of data to Earth.
NEWS
April 27, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Cassini spacecraft came so close to Venus Sunday that it was able to add 16,300 mph to its velocity, shortening its scheduled trip to Saturn. The international space mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency passed within 176 miles of Venus on Sunday morning, completing a "gravity assist" in which Cassini uses a planet's gravity like a slingshot.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
The moon and the planet Venus are giving North America a Christmas card this holiday, conjuring up the biblical story of how a bright object in the sky led three wise men to the infant Jesus. If the sky is clear, Venus--in its three-quarter phase--should be visible Christmas night just below the 2-day-old crescent moon for about one to 1 1/2 hours after sunset, a repeat of Christmas Eve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
With an electronic command whispered through a deep space antenna in Madrid, Douglas G. Griffith at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena sent the Magellan spacecraft circling to its doom Tuesday in the superheated, acid clouds above the highest mountain on Venus.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
By skipping an aging satellite over the atmosphere of Venus like a flat stone on a rippling lake, NASA has demonstrated the feasibility of building cheaper planetary probes in the future--and made it possible to wring another year of science from an old craft already in space.
NEWS
March 25, 1993 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Venus, the arid and intensely hot "twin planet" of Earth, once was temperate and covered by perhaps 75 feet of water--conditions that may have accommodated life, National Aeronautics and Space Administration scientists said Wednesday. But researchers at the NASA-Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
While a new era of missions to Mars is beginning, explorations of our nearest planetary neighbor are coming to a close, at least for the foreseeable future. Two spacecraft that have collected far more detail than expected about Venus are preparing to send their last rounds of data to Earth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
For three days this week, scientists from major universities such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UCLA pored over photographs and computer images, searching for clues to the birth of the mysterious mountain ranges of Venus. And although they didn't emerge from the workshop with any earth-shaking scientific discoveries, scientists from a variety of backgrounds learned something more basic--the spirit of cooperation.
NEWS
December 25, 1995 | From Associated Press
The moon and the planet Venus are giving North America a Christmas card this holiday, conjuring up the biblical story of how a bright object in the sky led three wise men to the infant Jesus. If the sky is clear, Venus--in its three-quarter phase--should be visible Christmas night just below the 2-day-old crescent moon for about one to 1 1/2 hours after sunset, a repeat of Christmas Eve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1992 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The dense clouds that have shielded the surface of Venus from human eyes have been lifted by a small robotic satellite sent to explore a hidden world, and the story of Venus is finally being told. The mysteries that the Magellan spacecraft have unveiled are of more than pure scientific interest, because they address the fundamental question of why the Earth evolved into a planet that encouraged the blossoming of a diversity of life forms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
For three days this week, scientists from major universities such as Massachusetts Institute of Technology and UCLA pored over photographs and computer images, searching for clues to the birth of the mysterious mountain ranges of Venus. And although they didn't emerge from the workshop with any earth-shaking scientific discoveries, scientists from a variety of backgrounds learned something more basic--the spirit of cooperation.
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