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Vera Hoff

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December 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vera Hoff, a key witness in the racketeering case against federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar, is embroiled in a dispute with prosecutors over what she claims is their failure to help her get out of prison as they promised. In court documents obtained Thursday, Hoff, 65, claimed her cooperation has "gone completely unrewarded," and she hinted that she is cooling to the idea of testifying against Aguilar, a friend who in the past was her employer and her attorney.
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NEWS
December 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vera Hoff, a key witness in the racketeering case against federal Judge Robert P. Aguilar, is embroiled in a dispute with prosecutors over what she claims is their failure to help her get out of prison as they promised. In court documents obtained Thursday, Hoff, 65, claimed her cooperation has "gone completely unrewarded," and she hinted that she is cooling to the idea of testifying against Aguilar, a friend who in the past was her employer and her attorney.
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NEWS
June 14, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
A federal grand jury Tuesday indicted U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar and two other men, both linked by authorities to organized crime, on eight counts of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and racketeering. The wide-ranging indictment is the fourth to be handed down against a federal judge in this decade, and the first ever under the Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, which was designed to help combat organized crime. Named with Aguilar, 58, in the 22-page indictment were Abe Chapman, 83, and Michael Rudy Tham, 69. Chapman, a reputed mob killer who has spent 30 years in prison for heroin trafficking, is related to Aguilar through marriage.
NEWS
June 14, 1989 | DAN MORAIN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
A federal grand jury Tuesday indicted U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar and two other men, both linked by authorities to organized crime, on eight counts of conspiracy, obstruction of justice and racketeering. The wide-ranging indictment is the fourth to be handed down against a federal judge in this decade, and the first ever under the Racketeer-Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, which was designed to help combat organized crime. Named with Aguilar, 58, in the 22-page indictment were Abe Chapman, 83, and Michael Rudy Tham, 69. Chapman, a reputed mob killer who has spent 30 years in prison for heroin trafficking, is related to Aguilar through marriage.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Testifying in his own defense Monday, U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar said the activities that led to his indictment on racketeering and corruption charges were actually innocent efforts to help friends, relatives and acquaintances. Aguilar, the first federal judge ever charged with racketeering, said he had a long historyof offering advice to anyone who asked for it, including law students he hardly knew. He said that this helpfulness, not any criminal intent, is behind his problems.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | From Associated Press
Lawyers for U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar asked Tuesday for dismissal of the racketeering charge against him, saying it fails to allege bribery or any other financial motive. In papers submitted to a federal court, Aguilar's lawyers made a multi-front attack on the racketeering charge, the first against a federal judge. They also sought dismissal of three of the other seven charges against Aguilar.
NEWS
March 20, 1990 | DAN MORAIN and JIM HERRON ZAMORA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal jury Monday acquitted U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar of one of eight corruption counts and announced it was deadlocked on the remaining seven. Federal prosecutors, though stung by the defeat, vowed to refile charges against Aguilar, the first federal judge ever indicted in California and the first ever in the nation charged with racketeering. U.S.
NEWS
May 31, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A federal grand jury Tuesday indicted a woman who is believed to be an important witness in a racketeering case that the Justice Department is building against a federal judge in San Jose. Vera L. Hoff, a former lawyer and friend of U.S. District Judge Robert P. Aguilar, was charged in a three-count indictment in connection with fleeing the country to avoid serving a two-year sentence for a 1978 conviction on income tax evasion. Federal authorities learned that Hoff was living in Mexico during their investigation of Aguilar, 58. With the help of Mexican authorities, she was arrested in Texas on March 20 and has been held at the federal prison in Pleasanton there.
NEWS
February 5, 1990 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prosecutors call him the "defendant," charged with the serious crimes of racketeering and obstruction of justice. Defense lawyers call him "judge." With his wire-rim glasses, salt-and-pepper hair and well-tailored suits, Robert P. Aguilar looks like a senior partner of a high-powered law firm. But today, the 58-year-old jurist will become the first sitting federal judge in the nation to go on trial on racketeering charges. He also is the only federal judge based in California ever to face trial.
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