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Veracruz

FOOD
September 12, 2001 | ZARELA MARTINEZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Hernan Cortes first landed in Mexico in 1519, he brought with him an African slave he'd bought in Cuba. Thousands more would follow in the coming centuries, forever changing the face, the rhythms and the flavor of Mexico. Mexico is commonly thought of as the meeting place of the Spanish and native Mexican worlds. But in the Caribbean states--and particularly in Veracruz, where the conquest of Mexico began--the African slaves and their descendants have played a significant role.
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NEWS
June 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Raymundo Barreda took his son north for adventure and a better life. They were back home Thursday, their coffins sitting side by side under a tin roof. Entire communities turned out before dawn to meet the 12 coffins holding sons, brothers and friends who died in the furnace-like Arizona desert last week while trying to evade the U.S. Border Patrol. The men allegedly were abandoned by smugglers. Twelve of the 14 who died came from the southern state of Veracruz.
TRAVEL
October 10, 1999 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The days were clear, the air spring-like, the flowers brilliant. Although it was August, typically a wet month in Jalapa, the rain obligingly fell early each morning. I awakened to the sound of droplets on the hotel roof, and by the time breakfast ended, puffy clouds were gliding across blue skies. Tourists tend to bypass Jalapa, the capital of Veracruz state, because it's known for drizzle and fog and because it's harder to reach than resorts such as Cancun and Puerto Vallarta.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1999 | JOHN ROOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Members of the traditional Mexican folk group Tlen-Huicani are adamant about preserving the integrity of the music they play, but they aren't selfishly protective. They've even helped others who are adapting traditional sounds to appeal to modern audiences. "Kids today are listening to a lot of electronic music," Alberto de la Rosa, the long-running sextet's 52-year-old leader, said by phone from a stop in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on a tour that brings the group to San Juan Capistrano on Saturday.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just three weeks after he resigned from this nation's ruling party, Dante Delgado, a former Veracruz governor, was in jail Wednesday, charged with illegally amassing a $57-million fortune while chief executive of Mexico's oil-rich Gulf coast state. Authorities described the embezzlement and influence-peddling charges against the former ruling-party stalwart as dramatic proof of the Mexican government's crackdown on official corruption.
TRAVEL
October 13, 1996 | REED GLENN, Glenn is a freelancer based in Colorado
In a corner of an old hacienda, a crackling fire took the chill off the January night. Further warmed by our host's tequila and spicy enchiladas, we sat around the table, hands touching, staring at a flickering candle. Prompted by tales that the hacienda is haunted, Ron, one of my fellow travelers was leading a seance. "Let the table rise, let the candle flicker, let the fire speak," he intoned dramatically.
BOOKS
March 31, 1996 | Kevin Baxter, Book Review news editor Kevin Baxter has written on baseball in Latin America and the Caribbean for a variety of publications
Imagine a scenario in which a multimillionaire Mexican businessman comes north and begins throwing money around like confetti, eventually luring dozens of the world's best baseball players to Mexico. Now imagine that the commissioner of major league baseball responds by banning anyone who participates in a Mexican League game from playing in the United States, a threat the Mexicans answer by calling out their army to stop fleeing infielders and catchers.
FOOD
November 16, 1995 | JONATHAN GOLD
In East Los Angeles, there may be as many places to eat seafood as there are fast-food chains: fancy places that specialize in big-bucks lobster parilladas and converted burger shacks that serve octopus cocktails; places with octopus ceviche and others with Baja-style fish tacos; representatives of the coastal states Colima, Nayarit, Sinaloa, even Ensenada.
MAGAZINE
March 6, 1994 | Lucretia Bingham, Lucretia Bingham is a free-lance writer based in Los Angeles. Her last piece for "Traveling in Style" was "Pastoral Perfect," about southeastern Connecticut.
THE TEAL-GREEN SKIRTS OF THE FOLK DANCERS WHIRL AS madly as the multicolored pinwheels held high by the passing vendors. An Indian woman with long braided hair gapes in astonishment as a line of nearly bare showgirls wiggles on a raised stage. Another woman dances past with a Pepsi bottle balanced on her nose, while her daughter follows, selling gardenias. Seven different bands are playing seven different tunes in various corners of the square.
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